NOFOD/SDHS 2013 Proceedings

Dance ACTions — Traditions and Transformations
SDHS 36th Annual Conference

Norwegian University of Science and Technology
8–11 June, 2013

The 2013 joint NOFOD/SDHS conference, Dance ACTions — Traditions and Transformations, was held June 8–11, 2013 at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. Each presenter at the conference was invited to contribute to the Proceedings. Those who chose to contribute did so by submitting pdf files, which are assembled here. There was minimal editorial intervention — little more than the addition of page numbers and headers. Authors undertook to adhere to a standard format for fonts, margins, titles, figures or illustrations, order of sections, and so on, but there may be minor differences in format from one paper to another.

Presenters’ affiliations and biographical information are shown as they appeared in the conference program book, which was compiled in June, 2013.

Individual authors hold the copyrights to their papers. The Society of Dance History Scholars is not legally responsible for any violation of copyright; authors are solely responsible.

Published by the Society of Dance History Scholars, 2013.


Entire Proceedings: [PDF (50MB)]

Individual Papers in Proceedings:

Author and Title (Link to PDF shows approximate file size. Author’s name links to abstract and bio.)Page
Acharya, Rohini. The Reconstruction of “Authenticity” and “Tradition”: Practicing Bharata Natyam in Honolulu, Hawai‘i [PDF (290KB)]1
Adams, Megan Ashley. Dance versus the City [PDF (819KB)]9
Aymami Reñe, Eva. Dancing for democracy in Spain [PDF (1.2MB)]21
Ballantyne, Patricia H. Cosmo Mitchell: Fashionable Dancing in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Scotland [PDF (2.7MB)]31
Banerjee, Suparna. I and digi-I: reading the ‘digital double’ in the contemporary Bharatanatyam choreographies [PDF (1.8MB)]39
Benthaus, Elena Natalie. “We are not here to make avant-garde choreography!” — So You Think You Can Dance and popular screen dance aesthetics [PDF (274KB)]55
Bork Petersen, Franziska. The Authentic Body Transforming [PDF (1.3MB)]63
Briand, Michel. Gestures of grieving and mourning: a transhistoric dance-scheme. [PDF (5.1MB)]73
Chatterjee, Sandra. Entangled Histories and Kinesthetic Connections: Memory, Heritage and Performance in Rani Nair’s Future Memory [PDF (204KB)]89
Colombi, Erika. The Fragmented Nature of the Modern Self [PDF (171KB)]99
Farrugia, Kathrina. Angelin Preljocaj, transmodern dance practices and the impACT of writing recent dance histories [PDF (226KB)]105
Fisher-Stitt, Norma Sue. Bridging Historiography and Ethnography: Nurturing Embodied Understanding amongst Undergraduate Dance Students [PDF (227KB)]113
Guan, Jingqiu. The Protesting Arabesque [PDF (227KB)]119
Harlig, Alexandra. The Madison Rises Again: History and Community at Columbus Ohio’s 1960s Dance Party [PDF (261KB)]131
Heller, David F. Rave-On! [PDF (214KB)]139
Helmersson, Linnea. The enthusiasts and the dance heritage — about the revival of traditional dances in Sweden [PDF (361KB)]145
Holt, Kathryn. “Order and Dynamism”: The Paradox of the Irish Dancing Body [PDF (195KB)]153
Hoshino, Yukiyo. The Influence of Madame Mao on Revolutionary Ballet in China [PDF (12MB)]161
Huskey, Sybil. Changing the Gestalt with Gizmos and Code: Amplifying Staged Dance with Interactive Technology [PDF (574KB)]165
Ivanova-Nyberg, Daniela. Choreographer as a Culture Hero? Bulgarian Folk Choreographer and Bulgarian Folk Dance Tradition Today [PDF (259KB)]171
Järvinen, Hanna. Some Steps Towards a New Pedagogy of Dance History [PDF (191KB)]179
Jimenez, Pablo. Transforming the Dance Researcher: Haitian Yanvalou and Maud Robart [PDF (1.1MB)]187
Johnson, Michelle. Dude Looks Like a Lady: The Otokoyaku’s Transformation in Japan’s Takarazuka Revue [PDF (376KB)]193
Karin, Vesna. The dance practice of the Dinaric people in Vojvodina (Participatory and presentational dance context of the people from Kordun) [PDF (170KB)]203
Klein, Kelly. Ecological Consciousness through Somatic Practice in Community-Based Performance: Palissimo’s “Bastard” [PDF (207KB)]207
Laakkonen, Johanna. Transnational Interaction and Dance at Hellerau: An attempt to trace the Hellerau Style [PDF (408KB)]213
Lenart, Camelia. Rehearsing and Transforming Cultural Diplomacy: Martha Graham’s Tours to Europe during the Fifties [PDF (247KB)]219
Maxwell, Adeline. Resistance in Chilean Contemporary Dance: A Question of Corporeality, Scene and Politics [PDF (170KB)]233
Milazzo, Kathy M. Blackface Guineo Performances in Renaissance Spain: Sites of Minstrel Production and Nascent Racism [PDF (237KB)]241
Oatley, Diane. Becoming Gypsy: Moving like the Other(s) [PDF (217KB)]249
Oberzaucher-Schueller, Gunhild. À propos Grete Wiesenthal. All of a sudden—Dance is Art! [PDF (191KB)]257
Passion, Maxx. Social Media as a New Paradigm for Dance Making [PDF (151KB)]267
Payne, Ursula O. Exploring the Tradition of Dance Reconstruction With-in Contemporary Performance Contexts [PDF (176KB)]273
Polimene, Andrea. Imbalances, Fractals, Divine Golden Sections. The Butoh dance, through apparent contradictions, as energetic experience [PDF (121KB)]279
Robinson, Laura. “Dancing for your votes”: Concepts of value in U.K male street dance crew performances on televised talent show competitions [PDF (197KB)]285
Rottenberg, Henia. The interplay between creating Hebrew culture in the British Mandate of Palestine and the dance of Yardena Cohen [PDF (173KB)]295
Rouhiainen, Leena. [keynote] [PDF (220KB)]299
Schjønsby, Turid Nøkleberg. Gesture as an instrument to understand and pass on early modern dance [PDF (6.4MB)]309
Scott, Gregory. Helping Restore Dance in Western Aesthetics: Harmonia kai rhuthmos as “song and dance” in Plato and Aristotle [PDF (202KB)]317
Setenta, Jussara Sobreira. The Speech Act of Bodies: modes of doing dance and performance [PDF (183KB)]327
Seye, Elina. Constructions of the past in words and movement [PDF (147KB)]335
Smith, Amy C. Unraveling the Sacrifice: An Investigation into Choreographing Death in Three Rites [PDF (203KB)]341
Speer, Kate. Transcendence, Testifying, & Funkitivity: The Spiritual and Political Dimensions of Charisma in David Dorfman’s Prophets of Funk [PDF (166KB)]347
Tahko, Tuuli. The dancer as a maker: interaction in the choreographic process [PDF (289KB)]353
Vaghi, Katja. Of Irregular Pearls: Baroque Influences in Jiří Kylián’s Work [PDF (298KB)]363
Walsdorf, Hanna. Do the Rite Thing: Construction and Tradition of German/ic Sword Dance Histories in the 20th Century [PDF (933KB)]373
Wawrejko, Diane. Daniel Nagrin: Dancing Agency in the 1960s [PDF (1.6MB)]381
Wells, Christopher J. Swinging Out in Sweden: African-American Vernacular Dance’s Global Revival and its Scandinavian Roots [PDF (182KB)]391
Whittier, Cadence. Transforming Tradition: The Integration of Laban Movement Analysis and Classical Ballet [PDF (249KB)]399
Wildschut, Liesbeth. A performance as shared space of action [PDF (1.4MB)]407
Wu, I-Ying. A Daoist movement practice unfolding the continuous transformation of in-between states [PDF (211KB)]421
Wu, Yi-chen. How technology actualizes dancers’ interfacing with new media sets within a polaristic context of Qi: the case of Huang Yi’s SPIN (2010) [PDF (242KB)]417
Yagishita, Emi. Isadora Duncan’s Adopted Daughters, the “Isadorables” : Their Activities and Characteristics [PDF (7.0MB)]427
Yushkova, Elena. Perceptions of Isadora Duncan’s art in Russian criticism [PDF (302KB)]435

Schedule Outline

To place papers appearing in the Proceedings within the context of the conference as a whole, the conference schedule is shown below.

Saturday, 8 June, 2013

1500 – 1800
  • Registration — Hotel Augustin, in center city Trondheim Moderator: Siren Døhl Himle (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
1700 – 1800
  • Guided Tour of Trondheim City - walking by foot. — Meet in reception area, Hotel Augustin Moderator: Per Erik Walslag (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

    The tour will start from the reception area of Hotel Augustin. The Tour will end at the To Tårn restaurant.

1830 – 2030
  • Welcoming DanceActions and Reception — restaurant "To Tårn" Moderator: Anne Fiskvik (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ), Siri Maeland (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

    Please join us for this opening reception outside of the Nidaros Cathedral. There will be Norwegian traditional dance and music as well as a short choreography by one of the city's professional dance company, Company Trondheim. There will also be refreshments and fingerfood.

Sunday, 9 June, 2013

0815 – 0830
  • Free Busride to NTNU, Dragvoll, Departure outside of Hotel Augustin 815 sharp

    N.B.! On Sundays: The first public bus transport — bus number 5 — does not leave the city center before 10.05 AM (arriving Dragvoll 10.22). If you prefer to take this bus or later ones, make sure that you get off the bus on the 2nd Dragvoll bus-stop. There are two; the first one is called NTNU Dragvoll, the 2nd is called Dragvoll. Our main entrance to the conference, entrance D, is in sight for the 2nd Dragvoll bus stop.

0830 – 1100
  • Registration — NTNU, main building Moderator: Siren Døhl Himle (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
0830 – 1700
  • Book Exhibit — D107 Moderator: Per Erik Walslag (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

    Please contact Anne Fiskvik, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , should you wish to bring books for sale/exhibit, all are welcome. Oxford University Press will be present with bookstand.

0900 – 1000
  • Working Group NOFOD (SDHS members also welcome): Contemporary Circus: convened by Camilla Damkjaer — Black Box Moderator:  Camilla Damkjaer (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )  [ details... ]
  • Working group NOFOD: Folk and Popular Dance Research — D1 Moderator: Petri Hoppu This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  [ details... ]
  • Early Dance Working Group (SDHS) convened by Jane Peck — D2 Moderator: Jane Peck (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )   [ details... ]
  • Students in SDHS Working Group — D3 Moderator: Thomas DeFrantz (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Working Group NOFOD: Artistic Research — D8 Moderator: Leena Rouhiainen (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )  [ details... ]
  • Working Group SDHS; Dancing the Long Nineteenth Century Working Group, convened by Hanna Järvinen — D9 Moderator: Hanna Järvinen (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Working Group NOFOD: Dance Pedagogy: convened by Eeva Anttila — D12 Moderator:  Eeva Anttila (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )  [ details... ]
  • Popular Dance Working Group (SDHS) — D13 Moderator: Melissa Blanco Borelli (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Working Group NOFOD:Dance as Service – New Roles for Dancers and Dance Organisations in Society: convened by Kai Lehikoinen — D14 Moderator: Kai Lehikoinen (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )  [ details... ]
1000 – 1030
  • Coffee break — Dining Area
1030 – 1045
  • Formal opening of DanceACTions — D10

    Welcoming words by conference chair, Anne Fiskvik, and presidents of NOFOD and SDHS, Susanne Ravn and Thomas DeFrantz.

    Formal opening by Head of Department of Music at NTNU, Associate Professor Trine Knutsen and Vice-Dean of Research, Professor Bjørn Myskja, The Faculty of Humanities at NTNU.

1045 – 1215
  • Keynote: Dance Actions that Developed Research in the Nordic region and Beyond: Leena Rouhiainen, Erik Ashengreen, Egil Bakka — D10 Moderator: Lena Hammergren
1230 – 1330
  • SDHS and Nofod award luncheon — Dining Area
1330 – 1430
  • Vertical Patterns in Feuilet Notation (lecture-demonstration) — White Box Moderator: Siri Maeland (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
1330 – 1500
  • Danscross/ArtsCross International Network: Translation and Exchange, the conversation continues (1) (roundtable) — D1 Moderator: Susan Wiesner (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Embodying Performance Art in Hawaii (submitted panel) — D2 Moderator: Hilde Rustad (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Practicing History in the Studio and the Seminar Room (submitted panel) — D3 Moderator: Kathrina Farrugia (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Bridging Historiography and Ethnography: Nurturing Embodied Understanding amongst Undergraduate Dance Students Norma Sue Fisher-Stitt
    • The Actions of Archivist and Dance Historian in Relation to Archives of the Nineteenth Century Classic Ballets Margaret Fleming-Markarian
    • Some Steps Towards a New Pedagogy of Dance History Hanna Järvinen
  • Politics, Resarch Methodology and Virtual Space — D8 Moderator: Gediminas Karoblis (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Thinking, moving, making; dance actions in real and virtual spaces Sarah Whatley
    • Promoting Democratic Individualism: Re-valorization of “Laban” Methods in 21st-Century Korea’s Modernity Hye-Won Hwang
    • The Protesting Arabesque Jingqiu Guan(Selma Jeanne Cohen Award recipient)
  • Tracing Transformations in Dance (submitted panel) — D12 Moderator: Karen Vedel (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Transforming the Dance Researcher: Haitian Yanvalou and Maud Robart Pablo Jimenez
    • Tradition and Transformation: Tracing Dance Lineage Mareva Minerbi
    • Outside Cuba: How Location, Identity, and Performance Propel Afro-Cuban deity dances into the Future Elbereth Walker
  • Transformations, Politics and Social Change — D13 Moderator: Thomas F. DeFrantz (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Reshaping and Transforming the Tradition — D14 Moderator: Mats Nilsson (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Folk dances of Madeira Island: past histories, present realities Margarida  Moura 
    • La rumba no es como ayer. Reshaping the tradition of Cuban rumba. Ruxandra Ana
    • Trans-acting a Battement Tendu: Tradition of Practice and Transformation of Bodies in Ballet Class Sophie Merit Mueller
1500 – 1530
  • Coffee break — Dining Area
1530 – 1630
  • They say I have to be creative but I’m stuck on my choreographic process (lecture-demonstration) — Black Box Moderator: Gudbjorg Arndadottir (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
1530 – 1730
  • Danscross/ArtsCross International Network: Translation and Exchange, the conversation continues (2) (roundtable) — D1 Moderator:  Yatin Lin (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Tradition and Change (submitted panel) — D2 Moderator: Elina Seye (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • The Reconstruction of “Authenticity” and “Tradition”: Practicing Bharata Natyam in Honolulu, Hawai‘i Rohini Acharya 
    • “Order and Dynamism”: The Paradox of the Irish Dancing Body Kathryn Holt
    • Dude Looks Like a Lady: The Otokoyaku’s Transformation in Japan’s Takarazuka Revue Michelle Johnson
    • Choreographer as a Culture Hero? Bulgarian Folk Choreographer and Bulgarian Folk Dance Tradition Today Daniela Ivanova-Nyberg
  • Tracing History through Letters and Gestures — D3 Moderator: Johanna Lakkonen (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Dance Education and Learning Processes — D8 Moderator: Hanna Järvinen (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Gestural Transformations, Dance and Play — D9 Moderator: Susanne Ravn (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Constructions, Agency, Democray and Influences — D10 Moderator: Lena Hammergren (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Daniel Nagrin: Dancing Agency in the 1960s Diane Wawrejko
    • Do the Rite Thing: Construction and Tradition of German/ic Sword Dance Histories in the 20th Century Hanna Walsdorf
    • Of Irregular Pearls: Baroque Influences in Jiří Kylián’s Work Katja Vaghi
    • Dancing for democracy in Spain Eva Aymami Reñe
  • Re-constructing, Reviving, Re-Enacting Dances: Issues, Problems, Concerns (submitted panel) — D12 Moderator: Kathrina Farrugia (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • The devil in the detail: leotard ballet aesthetic, the dancer’s agency and the issues of revival Tamara Tomić-Vajagić
    • Are Steps Enough? Reviving Petipa’s Sleeping Beauty Geraldine Morris
    • Re-enacting dance: history in the present Anna Pakes
    • Gergiev’s Sleeping Beauty (1890/1999) and Sokurov’s Russian Ark (2002): Towards a politics and poetics of the St. Petersburg danced total art work as performance of the past Helena Hammond
  • Traditions, Transformations and Revivals — D13 Moderator: Hilde Rustad (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Tradition and Chorography — D14 Moderator: Colleen Dunagan (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Confusion Around Fusion: The Slippery Slope of Choreographic Innovation in Odissi Dance Nandini Sikand
    • The Choreographer’s View—Performative choreographic practice and strategy as a method in the creation of an intercultural performance Birgitte  Bauer-Nilsen
    • I and digi-I: reading the ‘digital double’ in the contemporary Bharatanatyam choreographies Suparna Banerjee(Selma Jeanne Cohen Award recipient)
1930 – 2230
  • Conference Dinner: Train Ride to Resturant from center city at 1930, arrival Resturant ca 2000 — Lian Restaurant

Monday, 10 June, 2013

0800 – 0900
  • Registration — NTNU, main building Moderator: Siren Døhl Himle (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
0830 – 1700
  • Book Exibit — D107 Moderator: in charge of book sales/inquires: Per Erik Wahlslag (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
0900 – 1030
  • Working Group NOFOD, (SDHS members also welcome): Contemporary Circus: convened by Camilla Damkjaer — Black Box Moderator: Camilla Damkjaer (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Working group NOFOD: Folk and Popular Dance Research — D1 Moderator: convened by Petri Hoppu (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )  [ details... ]
  • Early Dance Working Group (SDHS) convened by Jane Peck — D2 Moderator: Jane Peck (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )   [ details... ]
  • Students in SDHS Working Group Chair, convened by Elliot Mercer — D3 Moderator: Student convene on their own
  • Working Group NOFOD: Artistic Research: convened by Leena Rouhiainen — D8 Moderator: Leena Rouhiainen: (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Working Group SDHS; Dancing the Long Nineteenth Century Working Group, convened by Hanna Järvinen — D9 Moderator: Hanna Järvinen: Hanna Järvinen (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Working Group NOFOD: Dance Pedagogy: convened by Eeva Anttila — D12 Moderator: Eeva Anttila  [ details... ]
  • Popular Dance Working Group (SDHS) — D13 Moderator: Convened by Melissa Blanco Borelli (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Working Group NOFOD:Dance as Service – New Roles for Dancers and Dance Organisations in Society: convened by Kai Lehikoinen — D14 Moderator: Kai Lehikoinen
1100 – 1230
  • Hip Hop Theatre redefined for a new generation - lecture demo (lecture-demonstration) — Black Box, Main Building Moderator: Pia Stilling (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Choreographic and Bodily Innovations and Transformations — D1 Moderator: Inger Damsholt (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Reconsidering Philosophical Writings and Choreographic Processes — D2 Moderator: Colleen Dunagan (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Helping Restore Dance in Western Aesthetics: Harmonia kai rhuthmos as “song and dance” in Plato and Aristotle Gregory Scott
    • Blackface Guineo Performances in Renaissance Spain: Sites of Minstrel Production and Nascent Racism Kathy M. Milazzo
    • Embodied timing—passing time Cecilia Roos
  • Dance, Theatre and Dramaturgy — D3 Moderator: Theresa Buckland (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Avant-garde Spirit of Dance Theater of Taiwan in the 1980–90s Yi-Ting Chen
    • Theatre as the Space for Dance Action: An Analysis of Contemporary Indigenous Dances in Post-Colonial Taiwan Chi-Fang Chao
    • “We have never been dramatic.” Some remarks on the staging of dance in the realm of the postdramatic Constanze Schellow
  • E-learning Workshop: INtegrating e-learning to foster creativity in Dance Studies (workshop) — D8 Moderator: Melissa Blanco Borelli (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Nationality and Commuity — D13 Moderator: Thomas DeFrants (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • The enthusiasts and the dance heritage – about the revival of traditional dances in Sweden Linnea Helmersson
    • Find the “Original”--- The Constructing Process of 1980-2010 Taiwan Street Dance Community’s Bodies and Identities. Meng-Hsuan Wu
    • Race, nationality and the folk—Ernst Klein and his early ethnographic dance films Maria Värendh
  • Tradition, Heritage and Reconstrucion in Folk dance — D14 Moderator: Egil Bakka (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Choreography and attitudes towards heritage transmission: Reflections on the process of making staged folk dance in Brittany (France) Fabrice David
    • Reconstructing Igue festival in the Nigerian Edo diaspora Georgiana Gore
1230 – 1330
  • Lunch — Dining Area
1330 – 1430
  • Dance and Music Practice of Serbia (lecture demonstration) (lecture-demonstration) — Black Box Moderator: Siri Maeland (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • A Daoist movement practice unfolding the continuous transformation of in-between states (lecture demo) (lecture-demonstration) — White Box Moderator: Elizabeth Svarstad (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
1330 – 1530
  • Transmodern dance practices and choreographic experiments — D1 Moderator: Yatin LIn (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Angelin Preljocaj, transmodern dance practices and the impACT of writing recent dance histories Kathrina Farrugia
    • The dancer as a maker: interaction in the choreographic process Tuuli Tahko
    • Drawing the dance. A journey through „gefaltet“, a choreographic concert by Sasha Waltz and Mark Andre. Florica Marian
    • Light, Interrupted: Using Dance to Reveal Light Andee Scott
  • Dance on Screen — D2 Moderator: Camilla Damkjaer (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • “We are not here to make avant-garde choreography!” – So You Think You Can Dance and popular screen dance aesthetics Elena Natalie Benthaus
    • Context Change of the Korean Traditional Dance: The Image of Traditional Dance Created by TV Dramas Haeree Choi
    • Step Up Revolution and the American Dream: defining the efficacy of dance acts Colleen T. Dunagan
    • Choreographing the Spasm: White Men Dancing in Music Videos Melissa Blanco Borelli
  • Dance Affects, Energic Experienes, Kinesthesia — D3 Moderator: Tone Pernille Østern (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • The economy of shame or why dance cannot fail Elizabeth Dempster
    • The dancing body and production of - and merging into spatiotemporal fields Gunn Engelsrud
    • Entangled Histories and Kinesthetic Connections: Memory, Heritage and Performance in Rani Nair’s Future Memory_ Sandra Chatterjee
    • Imbalances, Fractals, Divine Golden Sections. The Butoh dance, through apparent contradictions, as energetic experience Andrea Polimene
  • Dance criticism, Rekonstrucions and Perseptions — D12 Moderator: Gediminas Karoblis (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Isadora Duncan’s Adopted Daughters, the “Isadorables” : Their Activities and Characteristics Emi Yagishita
    • Perceptions of Isadora Duncan’s art in Russian criticism Elena Yushkova
    • The Twilight Space of Dance-writing Astrid von Rosen
    • Exploring the Tradition of Dance Reconstruction With-in Contemporary Performance Contexts Ursula O. Payne
  • Site specific and Interactive DanceActions — D13 Moderator: Leena Rouhiainen (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Performing Multiculture: Nordic Perspectives on Dance, Region and Migration (roundtable) — D14 Moderator: Inger Damsholt (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
1430 – 1530
  • Transforming Tradition: The Integration of Laban Movement Analysis and Classical Ballet [workshop] (workshop) — White Box, Main building Moderator: Siri Maeland (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
1530 – 1600
  • Coffee Break — DIning area
  • NOFOD National Meeting Finland — D2 Moderator: Elina Seye (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • NOFOD National Meeting Norway — D3 Moderator: Anne Fiskvik (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • NOFOD National Meeting Sweden — D8 Moderator: Camilla Damkjær (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • NOFOD: National Meeting Denmark — D9 Moderator: Susanne Ravn (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
1600 – 1700
  • Students Performance: Hawaian students give a free performance — Black Box
1600 – 1730
  • Film screening: ’Dancing with the Goddess: the Ras-Garba Traditions of Gujarat’, a film by Purnimah Shah — D2  [ details... ]
1615 – 1730
  • NOFOD: General assembly — D1 Moderator: Susanne Ravn
1815 – 1915
  • Organ recital in the cathedral Nidarosdomen, sponsored by Trondheim Kommune (Trondheim Muncipality) — cathedral Nidarosdomen

    Please take this opportunity to visit the beautiful Chatedral Nidarosdomen and enjoy a short talk on the history of Trondheim, greetings from the Trondheim muncipality as well as a professional organ recital. Free of charge.

2000 – 2120
  • Performance “together” — Downtown in Hotel Gildevangen  [ details... ]
2120 – 2300
  • Performance “together” — Downtown in Hotel Gildevangen

Tuesday, 11 June, 2013

0830 – 1500
  • Book Exibit — D107
0900 – 0945
  • Hand-Balancing: One Figure — Many Practices (lecture-demonstration) — Black Box Moderator: Gudbjørg Arnardottir (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
0900 – 1030
  • Challenges in reviving Norwegian traditional dance (lecture-demonstration) — White Box, main hall Moderator: Egil Bakka (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Political Choreography — D1 Moderator: Susanne Ravn (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Introduction on the Political and Educational Thoughts in Zhu Zai-yu’s Dance Notation Work Ren Wu Pu Lin Chien Yu
    • Transcendence, Testifying, & Funkitivity: The Spiritual and Political Dimensions of Charisma in David Dorfman’s Prophets of Funk Kate Speer
    • Becoming Gypsy: Moving like the Other(s) Diane Oatley
  • Dance actions in musical theatre, vernacular dance and jazzdance — D2 Moderator: Thomas F. DeFrantz (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Issues in Ballroom dancing and Dance Pedagogics — D3 Moderator: Gediminas Karoblis (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Urban Tradition, Aesthetic Condition: Ballroom Dance in Hong Kong and the Politics of Aesthetics Maggie Leung
    • The Study of Developing the Warm-up for Ballroom Dance Cha Cha Cha in Adult Class Jung Shing-Chin
    • Cosmo Mitchell: Fashionable Dancing in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Scotland Patricia H Ballantyne
  • DanceActions, Technology and New Media — D8 Moderator: Melissa Blanco Borelli (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • The Ethics of Presenting Dance Acts through New Media; A Comparison of Dances for an iPhone and the Legion of Extraordinary Dancers (LXR) Naomi  Jackson
    • Embodied interactivity and algorithmic performance Katja Nyqvist
    • Changing the Gestalt with Gizmos and Code: Amplifying Staged Dance with Interactive Technology Sybil Huskey
  • Nonverbal Interactions and Kinetic empthaty — D12 Moderator: Anne Fiskvik (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Recontruction, Revival, Notation — D13 Moderator: Mats Nilsson (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Constructions of the past in words and movement Elina Seye
    • Choreographic Text and Avant-texte: Jean Aumer as a Case Study Olivia Sabee
    • Revival of Tradition or Invention of Tradition? Anthony Shay
  • Divine DanceActions — D14 Moderator: Fabrice David (Fabrice David This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Dancing with the Goddess: Tradition and Social Transformation of the Garba Dances of Gujarat, India Purnima Shah
    • The Speech Act of Bodies: modes of doing dance and performance Jussara Sobreira Setenta
    • Dancing in the East Border of Taiwan: Performing Pilgrimages at Hualien Tzuhui Temple Yuh-jen Lu
1030 – 1100
  • Coffee break
1100 – 1230
  • Shake/Walk (Workshop) (workshop) — Black Box, main building Moderator: Sesselja G. Magnúsdóttir (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Dancing Communities — D1 Moderator: Pia Stilling
    • The interplay between creating Hebrew culture in the British Mandate of Palestine and the dance of Yardena Cohen Henia Rottenberg
    • Ecological Consciousness through Somatic Practice in Community-Based Performance: Palissimo’s “Bastard” Kelly Klein(Selma Jeanne Cohen Award recipient)
    • The Madison Rises Again: History and Community at Columbus Ohio’s 1960s Dance Party Alexandra Harlig(Graduate Student Travel Award recipient)
  • Dance Cultures, Competitions and Festivals — D2 Moderator: Fabrice David (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • You Shall Come Dancing With Us Daniel Tercio
    • ‘Dancing for your votes’: Concepts of value in U.K male street dance crew performances on televised talent show competitions Laura Robinson
    • The Worlds of Lindy Hop—Cultural Appropriations and the Politics of Joy Anaïs Sékiné(Graduate Student Travel Award recipient)
  • Transnationalism in Modern Dance — D3 Moderator: Anne Fiskvik (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Transnational Interaction and Dance at Hellerau: An attempt to trace the Hellerau Style Johanna Laakkonen
    • Rehearsing and Transforming Cultural Diplomacy: Martha Graham’s Tours to Europe during the Fifties Camelia Lenart
    • Dedications In Our Time: Lester Horton’s Tapestry of American Spirit Andrea Luján
  • Physical Actions and Transformations — D8 Moderator: Petri Hoppu (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Performing Political Agendas — D12 Moderator: Georgina Gore (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • With Glowing Hearts We See Thee...Dance? Nationalism and Dancer Activism in Canada, 1945–1957 Allana C. Lindgren
    • Resistance in Chilean Contemporary Dance: A Question of Corporeality, Scene and Politics Adeline Maxwell
    • Dancing in the streets: Dance and the Egyptian Arab Spring uprising Rosemary Martin
  • Dance and Social Media — D13 Moderator: Melissa Blanco Borelli (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
  • Choreographic and pedagogical proscesses — D14 Moderator: Gediminas Karoblis (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
    • Investigating the dialogical flow between choreographer and dancers in a co-creative choreographic supervision relation Tone Pernille Østern
    • Artistic supervision by a choreographer as reference in development of aesthetic approaches to pedagogical supervision Anna-Lena Østern
    • “Sincerely yours, Sergei Marinoff” An Exploration of Femininity and Pedagogy in the Sergei Marinoff School of Classic Dancing Manual Kathleen R. Jerome
1230 – 1300
  • Conference conclusion — D10 Moderator: Susanne Ravn and Anne Fiskvik
1300 – 1400
  • Lunch (sandwich - grab as you leave... or stay and enjoy...) — Dining Area

Panel Abstracts and Event Details

Working Group NOFOD (SDHS members also welcome): Contemporary Circus: convened by Camilla Damkjaer (Sun 0900–1000) — moderator: Camilla Damkjaer (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
Contemporary circus is growing and plays an increasingly important role within the field of performing arts. However, research related to contemporary circus is still scarce. This group intends to create a forum where researchers can share experiences, practices, methodological questions and ethical concerns related to the study of circus, and where strategies for the development of circus research can be discussed. The group invites researchers interested in circus from all perspectives and domains of research.
Working group NOFOD: Folk and Popular Dance Research (Sun 0900–1000) — moderator: Petri Hoppu This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Dance has always been a popular form of recreation, a way of spending time together with others as well as a means of expressing both individual and shared feelings and thoughts. Views and values shared by the community in question are embodied and constructed through dance. This deep connectedness of dance to its cultural context is maybe most visible in folk and popular dance where artistic virtuosity is not necessarily required. However, many of these dance genres exist in different transformations, both as social dance forms and as art forms performed by professional dancers. This group invites members to discuss any questions related to the research of folk and popular dance.
Working Group NOFOD: Dance Pedagogy: convened by Eeva Anttila (Sun 0900–1000) — moderator: Eeva Anttila (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
This group offers the participants a forum for sharing and exchanging ideas, experiences, practices, methodologies and research outcomes in the field of dance pedagogy. In the context of this conference, dance pedagogy is defined as widely as possible: it can refer to any dance form, any age group, or any institutional context. It is also possible to use this forum for an ontological analysis of what we mean by dance pedagogy in the contemporary world where, for example, dance forms can be learned, transmitted and developed without the presence of a “teacher” or without a formal pedagogical context and curriculum. A critical discussion on the role of a traditional dance pedagogue or traditional pedagogical approaches seems to be pertinent today for developing conscious and purposeful approaches to dance pedagogy.
Working Group NOFOD:Dance as Service – New Roles for Dancers and Dance Organisations in Society: convened by Kai Lehikoinen (Sun 0900–1000) — moderator: Kai Lehikoinen (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
Arts-based approaches are increasingly offered as specialist services to help innovation and learning in organisations. Likewise, arts-based services are available to enhance the well-being of different social groups. The working group explores the idea of dance as service to collect existing case-examples, identify new opportunities and detect potential challenges for research in this relatively untapped area. Dance-based services can refer, for example to artistic interventions in organisations that provide opportunities for the client organisation to perceive its topics and issues from fresh perspectives to be reflected upon and improved. They can also refer to initiatives where people are given the opportunity to participate in dance activities that enhance their well-being and fight physical, mental or social problems. The aim is to reflect upon focuses, frameworks, roles and competencies that the notion of dance as service may impose on dance artists, teachers, researchers and dance organisations.
Early Dance Working Group (SDHS) convened by Jane Peck (Sun 0900–1000) — moderator: Jane Peck (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
Convened by Adjunct Professor of Dance Jane Skinner Peck, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . I’d like to include three groups in my definition of Early Dance: pre-classical dance of the western world, indigenous dance before colonization, and classical dance of non-western cultures. My main goal for our working group is to share the various ways we are incorporating early dance of this broad definition in our professional lives. I am open to other additions to our agenda. I hope that our new personal connections in this group will encourage more activity in our field and a stronger presence at our next conference.
Working Group NOFOD: Artistic Research (Sun 0900–1000) — moderator: Leena Rouhiainen (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
Artistic research has evolved into a research field in its own right. Within its realm artists and other art professionals turn artistic practice into a medium of research. Articulating the tacit dimensions of artistic undertakings and producing artistic end results are amongst its main focus. This working group offers participants a forum to present and discuss an array of issues related to this field, especially from the perspective dance. Possible themes of interest are, for example: institutional environment, methodology, conceptions of knowledge, practice and theory, documentation, criteria, dissemination. Artistic research has evolved into a research field in its own right. Within its realm artists and other art professionals turn artistic practice into a medium of research. Articulating the tacit dimensions of artistic undertakings and producing artistic end results are amongst its main focus. This working group offers participants a forum to present and discuss an array of issues related to this field, especially from the perspective dance. Possible themes of interest are, for example: institutional environment, methodology, conceptions of knowledge, practice and theory, documentation, criteria, dissemination. Artistic research has evolved into a research field in its own right. Within its realm artists and other art professionals turn artistic practice into a medium of research. Articulating the tacit dimensions of artistic undertakings and producing artistic end results are amongst its main focus. This working group offers participants a forum to present and discuss an array of issues related to this field, especially from the perspective dance. Possible themes of interest are, for example: institutional environment, methodology, conceptions of knowledge, practice and theory, documentation, criteria, dissemination. Artistic research has evolved into a research field in its own right. Within its realm artists and other art professionals turn artistic practice into a medium of research. Articulating the tacit dimensions of artistic undertakings and producing artistic end results are amongst its main focus. This working group offers participants a forum to present and discuss an array of issues related to this field, especially from the perspective dance. Possible themes of interest are, for example: institutional environment, methodology, conceptions of knowledge, practice and theory, documentation, criteria, dissemination.
Working group NOFOD: Folk and Popular Dance Research (Mon 0900–1030) — moderator: convened by Petri Hoppu (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
Please see the information for Sunday’s session (above).
Working Group NOFOD: Dance Pedagogy: convened by Eeva Anttila (Mon 0900–1030) — moderator: Eeva Anttila
This group offers the participants a forum for sharing and exchanging ideas, experiences, practices, methodologies and research outcomes in the field of dance pedagogy. In the context of this conference, dance pedagogy is defined as widely as possible: it can refer to any dance form, any age group, or any institutional context. It is also possible to use this forum for an ontological analysis of what we mean by dance pedagogy in the contemporary world where, for example, dance forms can be learned, transmitted and developed without the presence of a “teacher” or without a formal pedagogical context and curriculum. A critical discussion on the role of a traditional dance pedagogue or traditional pedagogical approaches seems to be pertinent today for developing conscious and purposeful approaches to dance pedagogy.
Early Dance Working Group (SDHS) convened by Jane Peck (Mon 0900–1030) — moderator: Jane Peck (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
Please see the information for Sunday’s session (above).
Film screening: ’Dancing with the Goddess: the Ras-Garba Traditions of Gujarat’, a film by Purnimah Shah (Mon 1600–1730)
Dancing with the Goddess’ is an ethnographic film focusing on the performative traditions of Goddess worship in Gujarat, India, with particular attention to the regional variations of the Ras and Garba dances performed during the religious festival Navaratri. Garba is a circle dance signifying the eternity or circle of life and performed by women on auspicious occasions including women’s vows, ritual worship, wedding ceremonies, and pregnancies and hence identified as a religio-cultural heritage. In the last few decades, however, the impact of globalization, industrialization, urban sprawl and the proliferation of commercial media has spawned a diminution of religious practices of the garba on the one hand and an increasing popularity of the ’modernized’ secular versions of the dance on the other, giving rise to new forms such as the disco-garba. The film exemplifies these transformations and highlights the urgency for archiving these fading traditions and the symbolic meanings contextualized with their practice. http://vimeo.com/45917185
Performance “together” (Mon 2000–2120)
“together” is an interactive performance where stage and audience aren’t separated. The performance bases itself on the most important premise of traditional dances from Norway; participation.
This performance lets the audience experience a physical collaboration between norwegian dancers, each with a strong individuality. Accompanied by live traditional music, the dancers both perform for the audience and dance with them, and through the participation of the audience the piece will vary from show to show.
— In traditional dance the participation is a vital element. In my opinion, the best way to experience folk dance is at a close range, while participating, and that is what I would like to share with the audience.— Sigurd Johan Heide, choreographer.

Alphabetical Listing of Conference Presenters, with Abstracts and Biographies

Abstracts and biographies for all conference presenters are shown below, in order of presenters’ last names. Individual presenters hold the copyrights to their abstracts and bios.

Jump to presenter: Acharya Adams Akuna Ana Andersson Anttila Aschengreen Aymami Reñe Bakka Ballantyne Banerjee Bannerman Bauer-Nilsen Benthaus Bernkopf Blanco Borelli Blanco Borelli Bogdanovic Bork Petersen Briand Buckland Chao Chatterjee Chazin-Bennahum Chen Choi Colombi Custer Damkjaer Damsholt David Dempster Dickinson Doolittle Dunagan Durden Engelsrud Farrugia Fisher-Stitt Fiskvik Fleming-Markarian Flynn Garafola George-Graves Gore Guan Hammergren Hammond Harlig Heller Helmersson Holt Hoppu Hoshino Huskey Hwang Ivanova-Nyberg Jackson Järvinen Jerome Jimenez Johnsen Johnson Jung Karin Klein Kohlmyer Kolb Kolb Laakkonen Lenart Leonard Leung Lin Lin Lindgren Lu Luján Magnúsdóttir Marian Martin Maxwell Mæland Milazzo Miller Minerbi Mogstad Monteiro Morris Moura Mueller Nilsson Nyqvist Oatley Oberzaucher-Schueller Østern Østern Pakes Passion Payne Polimene Randall Robinson Roos Rosen Rottenberg Rouhiainen Rustad Sabee Sachsenmaier Schellow Schjønsby Scott Scott Sékiné Setenta Seye Shah Shay Sikand Smith Spalva Spanghero Speer Stalnaker Stranden Svarstad Svendal Tahko Tercio Tomic-Vajagic Urrutia Vaghi Värendh Vedel Viken Walker Walsdorf Wang Wang Wawrejko Wells Westwater Whatley Whittier Wiesner Wildschut Wu Wu Wu Xu Yagishita Yushkova

Acharya, Rohini (University of Hawai‘i at Manoa) The Reconstruction of “Authenticity” and “Tradition”: Practicing Bharata Natyam in Honolulu, Hawai‘i (Sunday, 1530–1730)
This paper will look at the classical Indian dance form of Bharata Natyam through three areas of practice: performance, pedagogy, and choreography. To contextualize my research in Honolulu, I first examine the emergence of Bharata Natyam as a globalized dance form and the practice of “traditional” and “authentic” Bharata Natyam within Indian diasporic communities in the U.S. Critically examining the terms “traditional” and “authentic,” I then want to situate the contestations and redefinitions of these terms in the diverse cultural climate of Honolulu and examine how location informs and impacts the reconstruction of a “traditional” South Indian dance practice. Employing the methodology of practice as research, I hope to critically question the validity of “authentic” and “tradition” in describing Bharata Natyam in Honolulu. I also hope to explore in these three areas of Bharata Natyam practice, a site of cultural negotiation where identities are performed and transformed.
Rohini started learning the classical South Indian dance form, Bharata Natyam, at age 7 in Los Angeles, CA. For the last 20 years, she has practiced, performed, choreographed, and taught Bharata Natyam. In 2008, she received her B.A. in Dance (World Arts and Cultures) from UCLA. Rohini is currently a graduate student at University of Hawaii at Manoa working towards her MFA in Dance (Performance and Choreography).
Adams, Megan Ashley (University of Hawaii at Manoa) Dance versus the City (Sunday, 1330–1500)
The stage art of cabaret has long been a place of provocation and social commentary where comedic and queer aspects allow issues to be raised in a comfortable yet expressive atmosphere. Studying cabaret is unique for a few reasons: every show has its own purpose for existing, its own duty to dances’ past, and its own desire to meet audience expectations. This paper discusses and theorizes these reasons for the performance pieces created by a group of students from the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and professional dancers in the community for an eclectic revue cabaret show titled The Great Flood which occurred the 22nd and 23rd of March 2013 at The Loading Zone, an art venue in Honolulu, Hawai‘i. The show’s theme dealt with worship, the body, creation, the spirit, and our experiences in the city. Performance pieces included satire, recitation, song, adult content, and social commentary all with pervasive dance. This paper is influenced by concepts from urban planning studies. What is the importance of experimental revue style dancing in the context of this city? What is the relationship of the dancer to the city of Honolulu, and might the dancer be influencing the city?
Megan Ashley Adams has a B.S. in environmental science but is currently an M.A. student at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. Megan's return to dance was vital to maintaining a healthy life as a human being both physically and psychologically. She strives to understand the urban environment where the incorporation of dance and dancing into everyday life is greatly challenged by the market economy and public policy.
Akuna, Sami L.A. (aka Cocoa Chandelier) (University of Hawaii at Manoa) Unveiling the Art of the Drag Entertainer (Sunday, 1330–1500)
Drag shows have been a breeding ground for ensemble numbers for many decades and are producing line numbers at this very moment. These performances hold a rich history of choreographic styles that not only embrace current trends and music but also replicate, deviate and expand the social movement in various venues across the globe. Cultural and geographic location contributes to the particular style of choreography which is often prime in Drag shows and taken very seriously. The director often hires a professional choreographer or the entire ensemble contributes as a whole or as individuals.Ideas germinate as a collaborative effort within the cast and or the director will pull from her stock of repertoire. This extensive repertoire of compositions spans from years of being in the industry of entertainment. These works remind the audience that even when the Broadway versions of shows like Cats have left the big apple, they are still alive and well in a drag revue somewhere on this planet. This venture invites all participants to pull out their most fabulous costume, wigs, heels and make-up and become a premiere cast member in the world of the drag entertainer.
Sami L.A. Akuna, aka Cocoa Chandelier is Artist-in-Residence at the Leeward Community College after contributing works as a choreographer, costume design and artistic direction. Sami founded both the House of Chandelier and Giinko Marischino, performance groups seen in Hawaii and abroad and still works as Drag persona Cocoa Chandelier, all over the globe. Fall 2013 Sami will be pursuing a Performance Studies degree at University Hawai‘i at Mānoa.
Ana, Ruxandra La rumba no es como ayer. Reshaping the tradition of Cuban rumba. (Sunday, 1330–1500)
The rumba, a dance complex that emerged in the 19th century, has ever since carried great weight in Cuban society, being one of the elements that define national identity, as well as an indicator of social conditions and attitudes regarding class, race and gender (Daniel, 1995). Throughout the years, the rumba underwent a formalization process that generated a shift from a spontaneous, improvised form to one adapted for specific performance requirements, opening up to the international market. One of the most visible consequences was the commodification of dance forms while at the same time trying to involve tourists in performances and dance events. My research, based on fieldwork conducted in Havana and Matanzas in 2011 and 2012, examines the processes that stand behind the conversion of a complex, multi-layered social phenomenon into a product that is shaped according to the expectations of both local and international public. Through the analysis of performance space and contexts, the paper looks at the effects of these changes upon the practice of rumba and upon the discourse around it, investigating the relationship between touristic modes of visualization and a system of representation that relies heavily on images of “authentic” dance and music.
Ruxandra Ana has two BAs in Philology (Romanian, English and Polish) from the University of Bucharest and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree at the Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology of the University of Warsaw, specializing in anthropology of tourism and dance anthropology, with a particular interest in the Caribbean. Has worked in publishing and cultural management in Romania and Poland.
Andersson, Ninnie (Doctoral student in education, Luleå university of Technology) Assessment in dance (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Assessment in dance This presentation mediates a study with the purpose to analyse and describe the phenomenon formative assessment of dance knowledge from a teachers’ perspective through the method of observations. The study shows that dance teachers use different approaches in their work with formative assessment. The teachers embodying dance actions is one of these approaches and connects to the theme of this conference. The study is based on phenomenological philosophy were human beings are inter-subjective linked with and within the world. According to this theory there are no distinguish between body and soul, they form an entirety. According to Merleau-Ponty (1962) the only way to gain insight of the world is through human experience of it. A basic rule and the starting point for research is to turn towards the things themselves and to be adherent to the things. This research is based on already existing research of phenomenology in terms of dance and assessment. Based on Spiegelberg an analysis of produced material of the study can show how teachers use formative assessment in classroom-teaching. The research questions aim to answer; how the teachers elucidates goals of the teaching, how teachers make achievements visible in relation to the goals of the course and how teachers make the students aware of how to increase achievements in the course.
Ninnie Andersson is a PhD student in education at Luleå University of Technology in the field of dance. Her subject is assessment of dance knowledge in upper secondary schools in Sweden. She has a teacher’s degree in dance for elementary and upper secondary schooland are certified in the Simonson technique by Lynn Simonson. She teaches the Simonson technique and methodology at the university and is coordinator for the dance department.
Anttila, Eeva (University of the Arts Helsinki/Theatre Academy) The enlightened body: Embodiment in research methodology (Sunday, 1530–1730)
This lecture demonstration focuses on the significance of embodiment in constructing knowledge. The interdisciplinary notion of embodiment will be discussed in connection to an epistemological shift, or the so-called embodied turn that has taken place in many scholarly fields. Embodiment and embodied knowlege are articulated as the core for consciousness, thinking, learning, and meaning-making. Further, this presentation focuses on the connection between prereflective and reflective modes of consciousness and the significance of embodiment in enhancing this connection. The notion of the enlightened, or the mindful body is introduced as referring to enhanced bodily awareness as an element of meaningful human life. The author argues that it is possible to develop awareness of the prereflective mode of consciousness through various practices and approaches that emphasize body-mind integration and first person perspective and that these approaches have considerable potential as research methods. The presentation includes examples of these practices and excerpts of reflective accounts gathered through these approaches and highlights the qualitative nuances in language that this kind of approach generates.Epistemological and methodological approaches to research based on embodiment question whether any meaning-making processes are possible without an embodied subject that interacts creatively and intentionally in social and physical reality.
Eeva Anttila (Ed.Lic, Doctor of Arts in dance) currently works as a professor in dance pedagogy at University of the Arts Helsinki/Theatre Academy. Her dissertation (2003) focuses on dialogical dance pedagogy, and her current research interests are, e.g., somatic approaches to dance pedagogy and embodied learning. She has published widely in national and international journals and edited books. She is an active member in many organizations in dance and arts education.
Aschengreen, Erik [keynote] (Sunday, 1045–1215)
Aymami Reñe, Eva (University of Surrey) Dancing for democracy in Spain (Sunday, 1530–1730)
During Franco’s dictatorship in Spain (1939-1975) popular and folk dances were empowered to construct a unified Spanish Culture. Francoism opposed the ideas of modern dance in direct contradiction with the traditional gender values the regime aimed to impose. Therefore, modern dance only entered into Spain during the last years of dictatorship with Anna Maleras opening her dance school in 1967. During the transition to democracy (1975-1982) Spain’s way to align with its repressive past has been characterized as a deliberate but largely tacit agreement to “forget” the past. Based upon a collective amnesia, Pacto del Silencio suggests an implied agreement between political class, media and society to avoid confrontation with the Francoist past. The new vocabulary of modern dance served as a driving force to modernization, but simultaneously reflected the silent commitment to forget history. With a feminist ethnographic approach, besides an analysis of silence and memory based on Foucault and Derrida’s theories, this paper establishes a critical reconstruction of modern dance as an emerging art expressing the democratic anxieties of Spanish society. Modern dance appeared as a practice of political activism to break the pact of silence.
Eva Aymamí Reñé is a doctoral candidate in dance studies at University of Surrey, United Kingdom. A Fulbright fellow, she holds a master’s degree in Culture and Performance from University of California, Los Angeles where she was a lecturer at the Spanish and Portuguese department. Her thesis studies the interrelation between corporealities and protest movements, focussing on the transition to democracy in Spain and the construction of political identities through dance.
Bakka, Egil [keynote] (Sunday, 1045–1215)
Ballantyne, Patricia H Cosmo Mitchell: Fashionable Dancing in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Scotland (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
A recurring question: how is dance tradition affected by social trends, regulatory bodies and the innovations of influential individuals? Cosmo Mitchell was the leading dancing teacher in Aberdeen, in the North East of Scotland, from 1881 until 1922. As a founder member and early Vice President of the London-based Imperial Society of Dance Teachers, he shaped the dancing of generations of Aberdonians. His archive collection of newspaper cuttings and ephemera is important, for not only does it detail his own career, it also tracks his teachers and competitors and the popular dance styles throughout this period. Mitchell introduced the latest dance fashions (‘Fashionable Dancing’) and steps to his students, whilst continuing to teach traditional Scottish dances. Cosmo Mitchell’s archive gives a fascinating insight into the interplay between traditions and fashionable trends leading up to the 1920s, a particularly important period in the context of Scottish traditional dance and music. Scotland’s dance and music today is strongly influenced by regulatory bodies who can trace their roots to the early 20th century. This archive sheds new light on the way these regulatory bodies developed, and shows that the complex inter-relationship between tradition, fashion and innovation that characterises ‘traditional’ dance is nothing new.
Pat Ballantyne is a postgraduate researcher at the Elphinstone Institute, University of Aberdeen, researching connections and disconnections between dance and music in Scotland. A percussive step dancer who also holds a teaching qualification from the British Association of Teachers of Dance, she is a former music instructor who plays piano in a cèilidh dance band.
Banerjee, Suparna (University of Roehampton) I and digi-I: reading the ‘digital double’ in the contemporary Bharatanatyam choreographies (Sunday, 1530–1730)
This paper investigates the ‘digital double’ in the contemporary Bharatanatyam choreographies by largely drawing upon media and performance academic, Steve Dixon’s (2007) conceptualisations. Although scholarly studies have been conducted in the realm of western contemporary digital performances to interpret the digital double (Causey, 1999; Dixon, 2007; Ploeger, 2011), there is hardly any research literature that analyses the double in the contemporary Bharatanatyam dance practices. This demands scholarly attention about how to read the digital double from practice. Questions that guided my analysis include: why do these choreographers project their doubles virtually? What do these digital doubles represent? Are these doubles twins, mirror images or imagined selves? The following video recordings of the performances are examined in this paper: Last One Standing (2009) by Seeta Patel and Kamala Devam and Many More Me (2011) by Shamita Ray. Drawing upon ethnographic interviews, personal observations, readings of the dances and other archival sources, I argue that the choreographers have featured their digital doubles as ‘reflection’ / ‘alter-ego’ to exhibit narcissism, split selves and the post-modern subjectivities. This paper is expected to contribute in understanding how the choreographers are shaping and expanding the aesthetic landscape of the contemporary digital Bharatanatyam performances in Britain.
Suparna Banerjee is trained in Bharatanatyam dance and a PhD candidate at the University of Roehampton, London. Her PhD thesis brings together various disciplinary lenses, such as anthropology, performance studies, cultural studies and sociology to examine the transnational Bharatanatyam practices in Britain. Her writings on dance have appeared in "Research in Dance Education" and "The Global Studies Journal".
Bannerman, Christopher (ResCen Research centre, Middlesex University) Danscross/ArtsCross International Network: Translation and Exchange, the conversation continues (1) (Sunday, 1330–1500)
These two Roundtables address questions emerging from an ongoing collaborative project involving Beijing Dance Academy, Taipei National University of the Arts and ResCen Research Centre, Middlesex University. Danscross/ArtsCross has brought together an international group of artists, academics and audiences to reflect on how collaboration might work when extended and embodied, across the linguistic, cultural, geopolitical, and geographical distances between them. Roundtable One deploys a range of transcultural and transnational perspectives to explore relationships between artistic processes and wider associations activated by location and environment,proximity and contact, observing and engaging in a dynamic, catalytic exchange. Arguably, performance is always a dialogic, collaborative process - between artists for example, or between them and audiences. In Danscross/ArtsCross, dialogue becomes translation, and translation in myriad forms moves from the unconscious meaning-making that accompanies our everyday being-in-the-world, into the full focus of our attention . But through a process of exchanging, translating and interpreting the strange becomes familiar, and then the familiar becomes strange; our thoughts are less firmly anchored, we speculate on new linkages and associations. And then we return to the groundedness of the studio, the stance of a performer, the articulation of a gesture, the resonance of a moment.
Christopher Bannerman is Professor of Dance and Head of ResCen, the Centre for Research into Creation in the Performing Arts at Middlesex University. He has worked in the dance profession as a dancer, choreographer and arts education worker, and has served as a panel member for two Higher Education Research Assessment Exercises and as a Specialist Assessor for the Quality Assurance Agency.
Bauer-Nilsen, Birgitte (Ph.D, associate professor, choreographer) The Choreographer’s View—Performative choreographic practice and strategy as a method in the creation of an intercultural performance (Sunday, 1530–1730)
This abstract will qualify the choreographer’s view, that is, to examine and articulate the choreographic process from idea to product. Because of my dual role as choreographer and scholar, my analysis takes practice-based research and “Artistic Research” as its point of departure. On the basis of courtship dances, I have created an intercultural dance performance entitled “Sommerfuglen” (”The Butterfly”). The performers are dancers and musicians from Tanzania, Vietnam and Denmark. Courtship dances have a ritual status in all three cultures.
First of all, local conditions are analyzed, i.e. the process by which a Tanzanian courtship dance is developed from ritual via traditional to performance dance. Next, the translocal process of the development of an intercultural dance performance, in which the local Tanzanian courtship dance features, is analyzed. The focal point of the local as well as the translocal analysis is artistic and social practices that support the dance event or performance. Which changes occur from local to translocal practice and/or dialogue? How can they be used in a global dialogue?
The theories and methods used to analyze performative choreographic practice have their origins in performative anthropology, performance studies and theories of performativity.
Birgitte Bauer-Nilsen is PhD, Associate Professor in Dance at the Department of Music and Dance at the University of Stavanger in Norway teaching in choreography and dance anthropology. As Choreographer and researcher my focus is on translocal meeting in dance performances. My dance ensemble is called Yggdrasil Dance. Latest choreography is “Footprint” an intercultural dance performance with dancers and musicians from Denmark and India showed at Tivoli Concert Hall in Denmark. 
Benthaus, Elena Natalie (School of Culture and Communication, University of Melbourne) “We are not here to make avant-garde choreography!” – So You Think You Can Dance and popular screen dance aesthetics (Monday, 1330–1530)
In this paper I argue that the television series So You Think You Can Dance is located within the broader aesthetics of popular screen dance rather than simply being yet another reality television format. Since the birth of the moving picture medium, dance has been featured and has been an active part on the popular screen – big and small – from the silent movie movement aesthetics, the Hollywood musical from the studio era through to the birth of the music video. The start of the new millennium saw another upsurge in the production of dance for moving picture mediums and an increasing presence of dance in the mass mediascape. So You Think You Can Dance, a television program revolving around dance and the figure of the dancer, which was launched in 2005, finds itself simultaneously at the beginning and in the middle of what I want to call “the new popular dance craze”, all the while drawing on and transforming the earlier contributions to dance on screen, creating a ‘haunted’ space as a result.
Elena Natalie Benthaus is currently a PhD candidate at the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne, Australia. She also completed an M.A. in English Literary Studies and Theatre Studies in Berlin and a B.A. in Modern and Contemporary Dance in Berlin. Her research project is concerned with dance and its presence in popular culture.
Bernkopf, Astrid (MIddlesex University, London, UK) Narrative Transformations: Matthew Bourne’s transfomations of The Sleeping Beauty (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Nineteenth century ballet narratives have become the epitome and monoliths of ballet tradition. Through the last decades of the twentieth and the early twenty first century many of these narratives have been re-worked and revisited. A re-reading of the various narratives has taken place to keep in line with the original, but also to add a new dimension through additions or updated interpretations. This paper presents an intertextual investigation of Matthew Bourne’s newest choreographic work to outline the changes of the narratives to reach new audiences. Bourne’s choreographic work essentially integrates aspects of popular culture into the performance. His 2012 work Sleeping Beauty integrates not only the recent vampire craze, but also draws on implicit messages of Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series published 2005-08. Here, a modern take on the narrative allows an additional layer of meaning to be added to the traditional fairy tale. Audiences of the early twenty first century can, therefore, access the older narratives and their messages in conjunction with the comparable narrative of Meyer’s. Through these interpretative approaches, dance narratives can survive and move forward to entertain audience of the new century.
Dr Astrid Bernkopf, Senior lecturer was a professional ballet dancer in Austria, Germany, the Czech and Slovak Republics. She studied Pedagogies of Ballet (MA with distinction) at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague and holds a PhD at University of Surrey, Guildford, focusing on narrative analysis of ballet scenarios. Astrid taught at the Academy of Performing Arts, Prague, University of Surrey, Guildford, London Metropolitan University, and is Programme Leader of Dance Studies at Middlesex University. Astrid was Vice Chair of the European Association of Dance Historians and co-edited their journal Choreologica. Astrid’s research is presented at various national and international conferences and guest lectures in Austria and Denmark.
Blanco Borelli, Melissa (University of Surrey) Choreographing the Spasm: White Men Dancing in Music Videos (Monday, 1330–1530)
Dancing in music videos is nothing new. From Michael Jackson to Madonna, the act of dancing to accompany a popular song has become a trademark of many music videos. However, what happens when a white male body dances? Why is it viewed with such novelty (e.g., Thom Yorke dancing in Radiohead’s Lotus Flower is a recent example and has more than 20m views since its debut)? What parts of the body are allowed to move and which ones should stay still? How does this comment on notions of hegemonic masculinity and the culture of neoliberal capitalism? How do the various dance performances enact new ways of thinking about 21st century white male first world masculinity? By making use of Franco ‘Bifo’ Berardi’s concept of the spasm, this paper traces a genealogy of white men dancing in music video to argue how they physically manifest the rise, fall and instability of neo-liberal capitalism.
Melissa Blanco Borelli is Senior Lecturer in Dance Studies at the University of Surrey. She is the editor of The Oxford Handbook of Dance and the Popular Screen (forthcoming) and is finishing her monograph She Is Cuba: A Genealogy of Mulata Corporeality. Other publications include: Women in Performance, Brolga: Australian Journal of Dance, International Journal of Screendance and International Journal of Performing Arts and Digital Media.
Blanco Borelli, Melissa (University of Surrey) Integrating e-learning to foster creativity in Dance Studies (Monday, 1100–1230)
Through this seminar, I will share my department’s experiences of creating a set of e-learning packages, open a dialogue with other colleagues about the challenges and benefits of digital transformations in education in the arts and explore how our processes may be beneficial to dance curricula.
This educational activity was part of the JISC-funded project: Contexts, Culture and Creativity: Enriching E-learning in Dance. I will present the process of the design and integration of e-learning activities in the dance programme and the impact this has had in our teaching practices. Working collaboratively with the National Resource Centre for Dance, materials from the archive have been digitised to further enhance available content on several prestigious artists. All the e-learning material is available to download for free on JORUM as Open Educational Resources with a Creative Commons license (Attribution, Non- Commercial, Share Alike). The goal of seminar is to show how the CCC:EED project has engaged with assessment for reflective learning and with a pedagogical review on the part of the academic staff that focuses on a more active participation of students throughout their studies.
See previous BIO.
Bogdanovic, Zoran B. (Ethnomusicologist, Soundcenter Novi Sad) The tamboura samica, traditional instrument in position of music and dance practice in Vojvodina region (northern Serbia) (Monday, 1330–1430)
The tamboura samica (derived from Serbian word sâm meaning alone, single) owes its name to its solo performance, either as musical accompaniment to the dance or to the song. In practice that means that although playing in the orchestra, the samica is simply as its Serbian name suggests – alone, itself; the fact is that the tamboura samica, with its unique performance features, compensates for what is actually played by orchestra. The repertoire of samica performance is determined by its own function and that is to entertain. Therefore, its repertoire is mostly of entertaining character, consists of music accompaniment of dance or songs, usually performed at different kinds of social gatherings, as the accompaniment of dancing in major festivities, dances at fairs, weddings and the like. This research is based on the author’s personal experience: instrumental, educational, and somewhat, in building instruments, and recordings of various origins, as well as relevant literature. “The Story” about samica will be given without pretension to answer every question related to this instrument and will be presented in a number of small sections. Afterwards, my intention is to present the current usage of tradition instrument in dance practice, as well as the musical characteristic, including practical presentation.
Zoran Bogdanovic is a PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology at University of Belgrade.  As former conductor of Traditional instruments orchestra, Zoran has an extensive teaching career that includes teaching in traditional music for students and composing music for choreographed dances, inspired by dances and tunes from Balkans. His research projects are concerned with traditional instruments and its presence in popular culture. Currently works as a Lecturer at the Sombor Music Highschool.
Bork Petersen, Franziska (Stockholm University/FU Berlin) The Authentic Body Transforming (Monday, 1100–1230)
In the programme leaflet for his piece Brilliant Corners (2011) the in-demand choreographer Emmanuel Gat argues that “[m]ovement can be the most revealing, spontaneous and truthful rendering of the human essence. Its immediacy makes it the echo of personality and it holds revelatory powers of the innermost human intuitions and sensitivities.” The notion of an authentic dancing body grew popular with the ballet d’action in the eighteenth century. It has since reappeared throughout dance history in the seminal work of Duncan, Graham or Bausch. But if the revelation of something ‘inner’ on the body’s surface is idealised as authentic, what this inner consists of and how it can be brought to the fore varies. My paper outlines this historical context and examines how bodily authenticity is defined, performed and evaluated. As a counterpoint, I demonstrate that some strands of contemporary dance refuse to confirm the ideal of bodily authenticity. I especially detect a critical attitude in the contemporary choreographic work of Édouard Lock, Kitt Johnson and Guilherme Botelho’s company Alias. These artists, respectively, propose hyperbolic, multiple and non-human bodies which undermine the belief that a true and beautiful inner can become visible on the surface of the dancing body.
Franziska Bork Petersen is working on a PhD thesis at Stockholm University and Freie Universität Berlin. Her thesis is about the notion of bodily authenticity; in particular its constructions and challenges in contemporary makeover culture, fashion, and dance. In Stockholm, Franziska teaches dance analysis, dance film and contemporary choreography.
Briand, Michel (professor, université de Poitiers (France)) Gestures of grieving and mourning : a transhistoric dance-scheme. (Sunday, 1530–1730)
In this presentation, which refers to cultural anthropology and aesthetics of dance, I intend to study a few remarkable steps in the long history of a special kind of danced gestures: expressions of feelings and representations of activities related to grieving and mourning, like lifting up hands in the air or upon one’s head and dramatically waving long hair. The focus will be set on some universals and similarities as well as on contextualized variations and differences, in a series of six examples: ancient Greek iconography of danced mourning rituals and tragic griefs; expressionist representations of death ceremonies, like in Mary Wigman’s Totenmal and Martha Graham’s Lamentation; the post-expressionist / neo-baroque synthesis in Pina Bausch’s Orpheus und Eurydike and Café Müller; and the popular re-enactment and re-interpretation of grieving expressions and gestures in some vogueing rituals and heavy-metal rock scenographies. The history of precise gestures and actions may be a useful instrument for the study of dance traditions, renewals, and innovations.
Michel Briand, professor of ancient Greek literature and culture, Univ. of Poitiers (France). Dance-related interests: dance (body, gender, vision …) in ancient culture; ancient references in modern and contemporary literature, critical theory and arts, esp. dance. Last publication: Michel Briand (dir.), La trame et le tableau. Poétiques et rhétoriques du récit et de la description dans l’Antiquité grecque et latine, PU de Rennes, 2012, 500 p.
Buckland, Theresa Jill (University of Roehampton) Transforming Lives through National Dancing: The Dance ACTions of Mary Neal and Grace Kimmins, 1887-1914 (Sunday, 1330–1500)
In recent decades, the singular role of Cecil Sharp in the early twentieth century folk revival of music and dance in England has been tempered by fresh studies which evaluate his motivations and those of the comparatively neglected figure of Mary Neal. Whereas Neal’s seminal contribution to the emergence of the national folk dance revival has rightfully been restored to folk dance historiography, her pioneering achievements in bringing dance to the under- privileged children of late Victorian England remains less well known. So too the remarkable vision of Neal’s contemporary Grace Kimmins whose work with dance and disabled children led to national imitations within her newly founded Guild of Play organization. Both women used the dances, games and customs of ‘olde England’ in attempting to ameliorate the lives of the young poor and to kindle a sense of citizenship and self-worth among the disadvantaged. This paper contextualizes the dance actions of these two influential women in the left-wing politics, religious and social activism of late nineteenth century London. Through this study, I aim to raise issues of class, gender, nationalism and authenticity that contributed to changes in the course of dance practice and access in England during the twentieth century.
Theresa Jill Buckland is Professor of Dance History and Ethnography at the University of Roehampton, England. She is the author of Society Dancing. Fashionable Bodies in England 1870-1920 (Palgrave, 2011) and the editor of Dancing from Past to Present. Nation, Culture, Identities (University of Wisconsin Press, 2006) and Dance in the Field. Theory, Methods and Issues (Macmillan, 1999).
Chao, Chi-Fang (Dept. of Dance, Taipei University of the Arts) Theatre as the Space for Dance Action: An Analysis of Contemporary Indigenous Dances in Post-Colonial Taiwan (Monday, 1100–1230)
Taking the current development, including form, style and work, of ingenous dance theatre in Taiwan as the example, the paper will present the dynamic interaction between social, cultural and artisitic invention focusing on the interpretation and imagination of the indigeneity in the post-colonial Taiwan. The presenter will argue for the idea that theatre is a spce of aciton for the dominated minority to negotiate the betwwen a collectice narrative of ’past,’ which is usally called ’history,’ and the continous pursuit of individual innovation that has become essential in contemporary art.
is Assistant Professor of Dance at Taipei National University of the Arts’ School of Dance, specializing in the anthropology of dance, indigenous dance in Taiwan, Okinwan dance, and the analysis and critricism of cross-cultural performances.  A published scholar, she has also curated the first World Festival of Indigenous Pepple's Song and Dance in Taiwan (2011). In 2013, she will work as the producer for the newest theatrical production by Formosan Aboriginal Song and Dance Troupe.   
Chatterjee, Sandra (University of Salzburg; Department of Art, Music and Dance Studies (postdoc)) Entangled Histories and Kinesthetic Connections: Memory, Heritage and Performance in Rani Nair’s Future Memory_ (Monday, 1330–1530)
Future Memory (2012) by Swedish-Indian choreographer Rani Nair is a performance piece about the choreography Dixit Dominus (1975), created by Kurt Jooss for the Indian dancer Lilavati and reconstructed by Nair (2003). Future Memory contains text, vocalization, audience interaction, video, as well as movement, and deals with memory and the responsibility of inheritance: Nair’s relationship to Jooss’ choreography, to the stories told around the piece, and to Lilavati, whose dance, costumes, dance-bells, and other personal items she inherited from Lilavati’s husband Bengt Häger. Nair’s piece will be analyzed as “performance” rather than a piece of choreography. I will draw on the approach of excavating entangled/“shared” histories and look at Future Memory in terms of intercultural interdependencies and border-crossing continuities and discontinuities between Indian and European dance: What is the relationship between the dance Dixit Dominus, the Indian dancer Lilavati, the German choreographer Jooss, and Indian-Swedish contemporary choreographer Nair? What kinds of new questions can tracing the “kinesthetic connections” (Srinivasan 2007) between Lilavati, Jooss and Nair open up for thinking about entangled histories? How does Future Memory reflect these kinesthetic connections performatively? What kind of lineage is established? What responsibilities come with inheriting a dance/archive and approaching it in terms other than those of a faithful reconstruction?
Sandra Chatterjee, is a postdoctoral research assistant (Department of  Music and Dance Studies, University of Salzburg, FWF-Project Traversing the Contemporary (pl.) ); PhD in Culture & Performance (UCLA); co-founder of the Post Natyam Collective, a internet-based network of choreographers/scholars, working in live performance, video, and scholarship, and co-initiator of Integrier-BAR, Munich. In her scholarship, continually strives to intersect research, theorization and artistic practice. Her professional dance experience includes classical Indian dance and contemporary performance.
Chazin-Bennahum, Judith (University of New Mexico) Young Ida Rubinstein: Letters to Akim Volynsky and Gabriele d’Annunzio, a tale of Transcendence and Deliverance (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Not long ago when I began work on a new study of Ida Rubinstein (1883-1960), I appealed to Lynn Garafola for some ideas, and she promptly offered a large notebook of Rubinstein letters, one of many that she had amassed some years ago. The early twentieth century witnessed the emergence of remarkable women performers, independent, financially astute and unshakeable in their desire to tour and show the world their mettle. Like Ruth St. Denis, Loie Fuller, Anna Pavlova, La Argentina, and Isadora Duncan, Ida Rubenstein produced ambitiously-scaled performances, hired many dancers, and visited many countries; these women were born with a fire in their bellies. These journeys helped Ida to define her place in the world, and to visualize the heroic figures she embodied on stage, --Antigone, Salomé, Cleopatra, Helen of Sparta and most fascinating of all, Saint Sebastian, in the play with movement and music for her by Gabriele d’Annunzio. Perhaps the most intriguing and mysterious letters in the collection were sent to and were by Akim Volynsky and Gabriele d’Annunzio. Often shrouded in secrecy, their missives suggest that these men might have had affairs with her, but we never do find out. What we do know is the extremes of emotion felt by all concerned. Ida knew how important and, in a sense, how powerful Akim and Gabriele were, and in her very wily way, she inserted herself deeply into their lives.
Judith Chazin-Bennahum, Distinguished Professor Emerita, researcher, and choreographer.  She was Principal Soloist with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet Company when Antony Tudor was Director of Ballet and also danced with Robert Joffrey and Agnes de Mille. She received her Doctorate in Romance Languages at the University of New Mexico and is the author of Dance in the Shadow of the Guillotine, (1988), The Ballets of Antony Tudor which received the De la Torre Bueno Prize in 1995 for the best book on dance, The Lure of Perfection: Fashion and Ballet 1780-1830 (2004), The Living Dance: An Anthology of Essays on Movement and Culture published by Kendall/Hunt in September 2003, Teaching Dance Studies (2005) and most recently René Blum and the Ballets Russes by Oxford University Press, (2011).
Chen, Yi-Ting (Taipei National University of the Arts, Taiwan) Avant-garde Spirit of Dance Theater of Taiwan in the 1980–90s (Monday, 1100–1230)
During the 1980s, a number of experimental theatrical companies in Taiwan turned into new fresh pages. What happened at that time had set off a boom of avant-garde spirit for theater movements. Radical followers of avant-garde theater came along with the convergence of social movements and non-political activities, which made a vivid and detailed record of the social transformation of Taiwan after its martial law was lifted. In the development of the avant-garde theaters, physical dance theaters applied body movements in particular to reflect upon the violence and oppression in social realities. Their performances combined with postmodern aesthetics such as collage and Pina Bausch’s “aesthetics of cruelty”. Performers made use of their own bodies to represent their critical opinions and multiple elements including sound, devices and environments all combined with dance. In the meantime, these performances attempted to renovate the art form and to display a fusion of social phenomena. This article focuses on the theatrical activities before and after the lifting of martial law in Taiwan, discussing the style of avant-garde spirit among critical theater performances in the 1980-90s.
Chen Yi-Ting is studying in Dance Theory, MA program, in Taipei National University of the Arts. Her research training founded in cultural studies and criticism tracks. Besides, Yi-Ting dances as a performer. She has been involved in dance from the age of 9, and holds Bachelor degree in Dance of TNUA. Base on her dance training, now her study interest focuses on the body of theatrical performance.
Choi, Haeree (Post-Doctor, Research Institute for Modern Korea, The Academy of Korean Studies) Context Change of the Korean Traditional Dance: The Image of Traditional Dance Created by TV Dramas (Monday, 1330–1530)
Haeree Choi received her Ph. D. in dance studies from Ewha Womans University. She has two M.A.; one in dance from Ewha Womans University and the other in Dance Ethnology from University of Hawaii. She is the former editor-in-chief of Dance Magazine MOMM and has lectured for years on dance theories and arts management at numerous universities in Korea. She has published several books including Elementary Labanotation: a Study Guide (Co-translation), 25 Years History of ChangMu Dance Company, and Korean Dance Stories Told by Dance Master Kim Cheon Heung. During her invited researcher period at the Arts Library & Information Center of Korea Arts Council (2008–2009), she directed the oral history project of 48 senior dancers and dance related people. Currently she is working on post doctoral research at the Academy of Korean Studies while participating in a research project for the Asian Culture Complex under the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism in Republic of Korea.
Colombi, Erika (University of Arizona School of Dance) The Fragmented Nature of the Modern Self (Sunday, 1530–1730)
The purpose of this research is to create a pedagogical model for a large lecture class that can be an effective teaching tool to enhance student learning and that the use of live audience polling can assess student comprehension in this setting. This model incorporates course content, dance and technology. It was created to address different learning styles and intelligences in one lecture environment while engaging students with the use of cell phone technology. One standing paradigm is that dance is presented primarily for stage performances. Dance is more generous, and can be used to aid research in all subject matters. The use of dance as a teaching tool might benefit students in an academic setting by creatively presenting new ideas that span several disciplines. Moreover, student involvement may increase through the use of live audience polling technology, creating a safe environment in which students can participate. Thus, the pedagogical model presented in this paper promotes a deeper understanding of the presented lecture.
Erika Colombi began training in Idaho, performing for both Ballet Idaho and Idaho Dance Theater. She danced professionally for Corpus Christi Ballet. Erika has an extensive teaching career that includes teaching for the University of Idaho, and Idaho State University. Erika earned her MS from the University of Idaho in Dance Pedagogy. She continues to pursue dance education research as a MFA student at the University of Arizona.
Custer, Teena Marie (Slippery Rock University) Hip Hop Dance Theater Redefined for a New Generation (Monday, 1100–1230)
A “cypher” in hip hop culture is a circle of artists who take turns “riffing” off one another’s ideas. In the spirit of this cultural paradigm, and in response to my own inquiry about labeling myself a “hip hop dance theater” artist, I started a scholarly “cypher” with my peers in order to assess the state of hip hop dance theater in the United States. The experimental concert dance form known as hip hop dance theater is around 20 years young. Pioneer groups such as the Rhythm Technicians introduced hip hop to theater audiences with Broadway shows such as “Jam on the Groove.” Today, there are many diverse artists working in and around this genre, and to 15 of those I posed the questions: How do you define hip hop dance theater in the U.S.? Is the form being preserved? Why do you choose or not choose to label your work as hip hop dance theater? The U.S. artists that I chose to interview were diverse in age, gender, race, socio-economic class, and physical ability. “Riffing” off of the oral histories and experiences of these pioneers, I add my voice to the mix, widening the circle of knowledge about a vital American dance form.
Teena Marie Custer  is a b-girl and hip hop dance theater artist. Her work has been shown at Sadler’s Wells Theater in London, American Dance Festival, and the Ford Amphitheater in Los Angeles. She has created hip hop works for over 20 university dance programs around the U.S. She earned an M.F.A. in Dance Performance from The Ohio State University, and  is on faculty at Slippery Rock University and the American Dance Festival. 
Damkjaer, Camilla (Senior lecturer in dance theory, University of Dance and Circus Stockholm ) Hand-Balancing: One Figure - Many Practices (Tuesday, 0900–0945)
The figure of “handstand” or “hand-balancing” exists in several different historical and contemporary movement cultures, but the techniques and practices differ and the functions and meanings ascribed to it vary. In this presentation I will explore hand-balancing in three different movement practices: Danish performance gymnastics in tradition of Niels Bukh (Bonde 2001, 2006), contemporary circus and the so-called Russian technique of handstand, and Ashtanga yoga (Smith 2010).
The purpose of this lecture-performance is to show how different cultural and physical practices construct different understandings and knowledges in and around this apparently similar figure. I will examine the ways in which the techniques for hand-balancing differ, which metaphors and images they employ to help the practitioner find balance, the ways in which physiology is called upon to define the practice, and the different experiences of balance it leads to.
The analysis will be based on research carried out through auto-ethnography, participant observation, interviews with specialist practitioners, and analysis of descriptions of hand-balancing in literature surrounding each practice. The analysis of this will be informed by recent phenomenological discussions concerning the structures of perception and sense experience (Merleau-Ponty 2002, Gallagher & Zahavi 2008, Ravn & Legrand 2009, Ravn & Ploug Hansen 2012).
Camilla Damkjaer is a Senior Lecturer in dance theory at the University of Dance and Circus, Stockholm. Her work is centred on contemporary circus and dance, the philosophies of Gilles Deleuze and phenomenology and how they can inform the study of movement practices, as well as the paradigmatic relations between the arts and the humanities and how they frame different forms of research related to the arts.
Damsholt, Inger (Department og Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen) Performing Multiculture: Nordic Perspectives on Dance, Region and Migration (Monday, 1330–1530)
This roundtable looks at the role of dance in relation to questions of multiculture in the context of ‘Norden’, here understood as “a space of shared histories and practices without limiting itself to (a) landmass” (Diana Taylor, ”The Many Lives of performance. The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics”. In J. Mckenzie, H. Roms & C.J.W.-L. Wee eds. Contesting Performance: Global Sites of Research, 2010, (p. 28)).
Featuring six members from the larger research group of Dance in Nordic Spaces (Inger Damsholt, Anne Fiskvik, Lena Hammergren, Petri Hoppu, Mats Nilsson and Karen Vedel), the roundtable departs from a live performance of the so-called ‘Folkevise-steg’ practice (Folk Song Steps). The roundtable next identifies shared points of convergence in the individual presentations that include topics on the global export of traditional Norwegian folk dance, the displacement of local dance practices in Sami communities, and ways in which different images of ’African dancing’ have arrived and been performed in Sweden. Other examples will focus on ‘the first dance’ of married couples in Denmark (representing different diaspora), the displacement, revival and tradition of the minuet in Norden as well as dance artists’ mobility patterns within and beyond the borders of the Nordic region.
Inger Damsholt is Associate Professor of Dance Studies, Department of Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen (Denmark). From 2002-2006 she was the chair of NOFOD. Her research focuses on contemporary social dance practices as well as broader choreomusical issues.
David, Fabrice (Université Blaise Pascal – Clermont-Ferrand (France) / NTNU – Trondheim (Norway)) Choreography and attitudes towards heritage transmission: Reflections on the process of making staged folk dance in Brittany (France) (Monday, 1100–1230)
In Brittany dance traditions are re-enacted both by a lively social practice (the fest-noz) and a powerful movement of folk dance groups. They have in common to be contemporary practices based on a cultural heritage transmitted by elders with a conscious relationship to the past. Whereas the fest-noz is purely recreational, most choreographic performances are created in a competition context, an arena where creativity may conflict with social expectations for authenticity. Folk dance groups have usually tended to legitimate the content of their performances by guaranteeing authenticity in the transmission process. In this presentation I want to discuss this issue as a dynamic of the choreographic process of staged folk dance in the Breton context. Through ethnographic fieldwork in the folk dance ensemble Kevrenn Alre (southern Brittany) I examine how their attitudes towards heritage are actualised in their 2012 choreographic work “Abenn Dimeurh”. The leaders’ discourse about archives and memory-bearers is analysed to discuss their role in transmission. Studied as a communication process, it displays a creative system that rearranges the past and sets up the first crucial step in the choreographic process.
PhD candidate in dance anthropology and ethnochoreology.
Dempster, Elizabeth (Victoria University, Melbourne) The economy of shame or why dance cannot fail (Monday, 1330–1530)
In dance performance the stigma of failure constellates at an affective bodily level, in the experience of shame. Although shame is commonly understood as negative, as Elspeth Probyn has noted, it is ‘a very bodily affect (which) has the potential to focus attention on the body as a vehicle of connection’. Shame signifies interest and engagement; it can draw the body of the dancer and her audience into powerful relation. In this paper I engage with affect theory, drawing on the work of Brennan, Sedgewick and Probyn, in order to reconsider the audience –performer relation in contemporary dance practice. This inquiry was initially provoked by the experience of watching ode to summer by American dance artist Jennifer Monson. In this solo the interdependence of the dancer and her audience is made explicit and within this charged context shame is activated as a force of transformation, affecting both performer and witness. Investigating the kinds of identifications activated by dance actions, the paper considers how negative affect and failure may be generative of both artistic and critical insight. I will also advance the view that fear of failure and avoidance of shame may significantly constrain dance practice such that large domains of human experience are foreclosed from representation.
Dr Elizabeth Dempster currently lectures in Performance Studies at Victoria University, Melbourne. A former dancer/choreographer, her choreographic work has been presented throughout Australia and in the UK. Her research and writing has been published in various journals and books including Bodies of the Text: Dance as Theory, Literature as Dance and Imagining Australian Space: Cultural Studies and Spatial Inquiry. She is co-editor of the journal Writings on Dance.
Dickinson, Barbara (Duke University) Transition and Transformation: the Art of Margie Gillis. (Monday, 1100–1230)
Using my previous research on aging and the dance artist as a foundation, this paper looks at Canadian artist Margie Gillis as an outstanding role model who reveals to audiences the power of mature artistry, and who has developed new ways that her knowledge can serve many areas of life. In modern dance and ballet, the deepening of one’s artistry is eventually and inevitably tied to a decline in physical capabilities. Once performers pass their physical prime, retirement from the stage soon follows. Only a handful of artists continue an ongoing process of discovery, transition and transformation, building on their embodied wisdom rather than receding from it. Gillis has maintained an active choreographic and performance career followed with interest by audiences of all ages. Her teaching method uses approaches that seek to integrate the physical, intellectual, emotional and spiritual. She has developed a method of conflict resolution through a constant reexamination of her choreographic process. Using interviews, archival research, and analysis of live and taped performance material, this paper examines what this woman has to teach so that others are encouraged to turn from the traditional path of cessation and continue to reinvestigate and reinterpret the potential of dance.
Barbara Dickinson, Professor of the Practice of Dance at Duke University, served as Dance Program Director for eighteen years, overseeing faculty growth, guiding the focus of a greatly expanded curriculum and establishing a major in dance at this top research university. She has created many full-length collaborative works including Walking Miracles, based on the stories of survivors of child sexual abuse, and Contents Under Pressure, an exploration of bias.
Doolittle, Lisa (University of Lethbridge) and Anne Flynn (University of Calgary) The Canada Project: Dance, Research and Social Change (Sunday, 1330–1500)
This joint presentation provides an overview of a national project in the field of arts and social change ([conference2013-Trondheim/schedule.php] .5 million, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council). The five-year project will contribute to coherence, consolidation and innovation in the work of scholars, artists, service providers and policymakers, and provide new resources for a wider public. The presentation focuses on dance case studies included in this national initiative. Using a range of inclusive research approaches, the project’s three inter-connected questions are: What are the current models for teaching arts for social change in Canada in post-secondary and community settings? What integrated strategies can advance learning in the field? How is this work evaluated? Are current methods appropriate to current needs? How can/does dance contribute to community capacity building in “non-arts” settings - in community development and social innovation. How can new partnerships (community-based practitioners, scholars, students, funders, and public and private sector organizations) lead to innovation in the application of dance for social change?
The project includes university and community groups from Vancouver to Montreal, blending the work of artists, health and legal professionals. This presentation explores how dance artist/scholars may collaborate across disciplines to act on social issues.
Lisa Doolittle, an award-winning scholar, international educator, and choreographer/director, has presented and published internationally on community-engaged and intercultural performance, Canadian dance and multiculturalism, and indigenous dance. She has led numerous participatory theatre and dance projects including intergenerational performance with Age Exchange, London UK, health promotion in rural Malawi, and community-university collaborations with Blackfoot students, refugees and immigrants in Alberta. Doolittle’s research on performance and arts-based pedagogy projects appears in interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journals and in dance and performance studies anthologies. Doolittle is Professor in Theatre Arts at the University of Lethbridge.
Dunagan, Colleen T. (Associate Professor of Dance, California State University Long Beach) Step Up Revolution and the American Dream: defining the efficacy of dance acts (Monday, 1330–1530)
In this paper presentation, “Step Up Revolution and the American Dream: defining the efficacy of dance acts,” I explore how dance in mass-media forms actualizes certain potentials while de-actualizing others through an analysis of the film Step Up Revolution. I argue that the film presents a complicated and contradictory message about freedom of expression, identity, and class. It co-opts embodied forms of social protest and dance, drawing on the values of the Occupy Movement, hip hop, and flash mobs to generate meaning, but at the same time activates dance as a vehicle for American capitalist ideologies, particularly the pursuit of the American Dream. Despite, or perhaps because of this conflict, it offers many of its viewers an affirmation of their corporeality and the values inherent in their dance practices. This analysis arises out of a desire to consider how appropriation may function as a form of insidious ideological control within the United States’ capitalist, mass-media dominated culture, in effect censoring subordinate bodies and ideas, often while appearing to champion them. Finally, the choice of vehicles for my analysis raises the question of dance studies’ role in defining the cultural relevance of a given dance “act.”
Colleen T. Dunagan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dance, California State University, Long Beach. She has presented her research at SDHS, CORD, and PCA. Her writing on dance in television and film has appeared in Dance Research Journal and The International Journal of Arts in Society and is forthcoming in The Oxford Handbook of Dance and the Popular Screen and Movies, Moves, and Music: the Sonic World of Dance Film.
Durden, E. Moncell (The New School, Temple University) Hip-Hop Dance in Context: Critical Reflections on Retention of Vernacular Jazz in Hip-Hop, and its impact on dance education (Sunday, 1530–1730)
In this paper, I offer insight into the historical context of hip-hop social dance formations, exposing the genealogy of the authentic jazz dance continuum. I shall examine the need for more diverse, in-depth study of 20th century social dance practices. Then I shall highlight an assortment of influential cross-cultural phenomena that helped construct and characterize Americas social dance identities. I shall demonstrate & decode Americas social dance lineage that is often overshadowed by mass media, and offer a dynamic educational paradigm for new integrated and interdisciplinary approaches that teach these dance formations as a cultural studies program which, explores ethnology, cognitive science, sociolinguistics and anatomy through a medium students crave to learn. The globalization and complex blend of hip-hops racial participation and unique interests, provides a learning environment that promotes communication and collaboration that share personal identities and further develop social identities among a diverse student population. Building students’ respect for cultural diversity through concepts of communication, utilizing various topics of discussion and forms of social dance. Intuitively developing critical and creative minds as participates analyze and embody the social commentary shaped by America’s environmental, political, economical and cultural production.
E. Moncell Durden is a Philadelphia-based embodied dance historian, who performs and educates both nationally and internationally. Moncell, specializes in the pedagogical practices of African American social dance formation, from authentic jazz to hip-hop. Currently teaching at The New School in NYC and Wesleyan University, Moncell performed 10 years with Rennie Harris Puremovement, recently contributed to Jazz Dance: Roots and Branches, a new undergrad book published by University of Florida.
Engelsrud, Gunn The dancing body and production of - and merging into spatiotemporal fields (Monday, 1330–1530)
The presentation examines how Samuel Todes (1) theory can contribute to the understanding how dancing bodies produces- and merges into spatiotemporal fields. Todes’ concepts “absorbed skillful action“ and “attentive trying” is used for analyses of a material based on young dancers written notes about their own training. The aim is to try out if these concepts can open for an understanding of how the young dancers’ skillful coping is situated between receptivity/passivity and intentional movements. The presentation aim to contribute to a productive understanding of dancers training; based on dancers’ experience of merging into- and producing spatiotemporal fields. The presentation problematizes ideas of dancers training as something that is produced in and by the isolated body. (1) Samuel Todes doctoral theses “The body as the material subject of the world” was later published as “Body and world” in 2004.
Gunn Engelsrud is Professor and Head of Department of Physical Education at the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences. Her specific interest is to combining practical skills with philosophical reflection, in particular on bodily and relational experiences. She has taken great inspiration from phenomenology and the lived body, which has stimulated her research on movement experiences (in martial arts, dance, cross country skiing, yoga among others). She has supervised several Ph.D. students and published within the fields of clinical communication, health and aging, obesity, dance and creativity, adapted physical education and movement potentials.
Farrugia, Kathrina (Faculty of Education, Royal Academy of Dance) Angelin Preljocaj, transmodern dance practices and the impACT of writing recent dance histories (Monday, 1330–1530)
This paper explores the impact of French choreographer Angelin Preljocaj. On close analysis, Preljocaj’s choreographic influences and the ‘shards’ of performance histories embedded within his work suggest a complex set of recent dance histories. As I make a case through examples from Preljocaj’s Empty Moves, this paper boldly proposes ways through which a new theoretical framework, notably transmodernism (Lewis 2011), may transfer effectively from the field of literature studies to that of dance studies. Transmodern dance practices (Farrugia 2012) illustrate the impact of and response to the values from the interstitial transference of migrated practices and find ways of reconnecting through composite, non-linear scaffolded acts and actions.
Dr Kathrina Farrugia graduated from the Royal Academy of Dance (2003) followed by the University of Surrey (2005) and London Metropolitan University (2012).  Her doctoral thesis, ‘Transmodern Dance Practices: Angelin Preljocaj, Mauro Bigonzetti and revisions of Les Noces (1923)’, was supervised by Dr Giannandrea Poesio and Dr Anne Hogan.  She set up three-fortyone dances in 2003, touring Fringe Festivals of Edinburgh (2004) and Brighton (2007) and is currently Lecturer in Dance Studies at the Faculty of Education (RAD).
Fisher-Stitt, Norma Sue (York University) Bridging Historiography and Ethnography: Nurturing Embodied Understanding amongst Undergraduate Dance Students (Sunday, 1330–1500)
In this paper, I explore the interactions of ethnography and historiography in the education of dance majors in a university setting. Several years ago, I taught a group of undergraduate dance majors in two different venues: in the studio for ballet technique and in the lecture hall for pre-20th century western dance history. This situation presented a unique opportunity through which to introduce the evolution of ballet technique as well as various historical approaches to the teaching of dance. Our daily learning and doing of technique in the dance studio explored and reinforced the content that was viewed and discussed in the lecture hall. For undergraduate dance majors, embodied learning of earlier western dance forms is similar to conducting ethnographic research. Experiencing movements from other eras is reminiscent of exploring dances of other cultures; the difference lies in the research methodology. Instead of entering another culture as participant observers, the students explore other eras as participant historians, examining, translating, and embodying the information gleaned from dance manuals, texts, and artifacts. Theoretically, they are introduced to the co-existence of ethnographic, historical, and intertextual approaches that support the research, writing, and experience of dance from previous eras.
Norma Sue Fisher-Stitt is a Professor and Graduate Program Director in the Dance Department at York University; she teaches studies and studio classes. Dr. Fisher-Stitt is the author of The Ballet Class: A History of Canada’s National Ballet School and she has presented papers at the Society of Dance History Scholars, the Canadian Society for Dance Studies, the European Association of Dance Historians, and the Canadian Association for Theatre Research.
Fiskvik, Anne Margrete (NTNU) Performing Multiculture: Nordic Perspectives on Dance, Region and Migration (Monday, 1330–1530)
This roundtable looks at the role of dance in relation to questions of multiculture in the context of ‘Norden’, here understood as “a space of shared histories and practices without limiting itself to (a) landmass” (Diana Taylor, ”The Many Lives of performance. The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics”. In J. Mckenzie, H. Roms & C.J.W.-L. Wee eds. Contesting Performance: Global Sites of Research, 2010, (p. 28)).
Featuring six members from the larger research group of Dance in Nordic Spaces (Inger Damsholt, Anne Fiskvik, Lena Hammergren, Petri Hoppu, Mats Nilsson and Karen Vedel), the roundtable departs from a live performance of the so-called ‘Folkevise-steg’ practice (Folk Song Steps). The roundtable next identifies shared points of convergence in the individual presentations that include topics on the global export of traditional Norwegian folk dance, the displacement of local dance practices in Sami communities, and ways in which different images of ’African dancing’ have arrived and been performed in Sweden. Other examples will focus on ‘the first dance’ of married couples in Denmark (representing different diaspora), the displacement, revival and tradition of the minuet in Norden as well as dance artists’ mobility patterns within and beyond the borders of the Nordic region.
Dr. Anne Fiskvik works as associate professor at NTNU, in the department of music/dance. Previously a dancer and choreographer, she now does resarch on choreomusical relationships, popular dance, Norwegian folkdance (Halling) and Norwegian theatre dance history.
Fleming-Markarian, Margaret (Member of the Royal Academy of Dance) The Actions of Archivist and Dance Historian in Relation to Archives of the Nineteenth Century Classic Ballets (Sunday, 1330–1500)
Garafola, Lynn (Barnard College, Columbia University) Letters from Home: Bronislava Nijinska’s Uncertain Return to the West (Sunday, 1530–1730)
In 1922, Nijinska left off recording her thoughts in a dairy. Instead, she seems to have adopted letters as her medium of subjective expression, and correspondence with friends and former students of her School of Movement in Kiev as the means of working out key decisions about her future. The most pressing was whether to return to Russia or remain with Diaghilev in the West. A second was how to reconstitute her school so as to resume the experimental choreographic path she had pursued in Kiev. Nijinska’s letters vanished decades ago. But the letters from her friends and former students, accompanied by envelopes with postmarks that followed her from Vienna to Paris, London, and Monte Carlo, were kept for decades by the choreographer. She wrote out excepts from them in notes probably intended for a memoir she never wrote, and they now form part of the Bronislava Nijinska Collection at the Library of Congress. These letters afford a rare, intimate glimpse of Nijinska at a pivotal moment in her career. They comment upon her unhappiness both personal and artistic, her relentless drive in the service of “creativity,” her loneliness and alienation from the other dancers. They make clear that once she had decided to stay in the West, she intended to re-establish her school in Vienna – a plan, like so many others, that fell through.
Lynn Garafola is a Professor of Dance at Barnard College, Columbia University.  A historian and critic, she is the author of Diaghilev's Ballets Russes and Legacies of Twentieth-Century Dance, editor of The Ballets Russes and Its World and other books, and curator of exhibitions on the New York City Ballet, Jerome Robbins, and other subjects at the New-York Historical Society, City Center, and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.  She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship to support her current book project about the choreographer Bronislava Nijinska.
George-Graves, Nadine (University of California, San Diego) Professionalizing Black Dance: Toby Dancers at the Beginning of the 20th Century (Sunday, 1330–1500)
In this paper, Nadine George-Graves investigates the unofficial political strategies and social negotiations by black dancers working with the Theatre Owners Booking Association in the early part of the 20th century. These were the pioneers of the increasing stage presence of African American dancers and their negotiations set the stage for a major shift in American concert dance. During this transition into professionalism in black dance, these dancers impacted the communities to which they toured, found ways to distinguish themselves and helped create new aesthetics. How did Northern black dancers perform in the South? How were taboos around sex negotiated in the swing of the hips? What did the culture of one-up-manship say about pride, value and ownership? How did they dance their politics and activism? What were the social as well as aesthetic stakes of performing?
Nadine George-Graves’ work is situated at the intersections of African American, gender, performance, theatre, and dance studies. She wrote The Royalty of Negro Vaudeville The Whitman Sisters and the Negotiation of Race, Gender, and Class in African American Theater and Urban Bush Women: Twenty Years of Dance Theater, Community Engagement and Working It Out. She is currently editing The Oxford Handbook of Dance and Theater. She is president-elect of CORD.
Gore, Georgiana (Blaise Pascal University Clermont 2) Reconstructing Igue festival in the Nigerian Edo diaspora (Monday, 1100–1230)
The Igue festival, the annual ceremonial rituals celebrating divine kingship amongst the Edo of Southern Nigeria, invokes historic events through dramatised and danced actions. It engages its participants not only in a recollection of ancestral prowess, but also in a spectacular enactment and affirmation of contemporary power in which past, present and future are condensed, especially when the Oba (king) of Benin dances and tosses the eben (sword) to honour his own head. The festival is constituted of some ten rituals consolidated at the end of the civil year so as to enable the participation of the “sons and daughters of the land”, who return to Benin-City over the Christmas holidays. What of those, however, who cannot make the journey home? Such is the significance of Igue for the Edo that it is today celebrated in various guises throughout the diasporic communities. In the Republic of Ireland, the festivities are particularly elaborate ranging from ritual like enactment with song, dance and the chiefly tossing of the eben (sword) to more formalized speech-making to honour guests and local dignitaries. Analysing such events contributes to understanding the creative transformation of tradition in the context of diasporic politics and identity construction.
Georgiana Gore is Professor of Anthropology of Dance at Blaise Pascal University, France. She is local convenor for two masters programmes which she co-founded: EMAD (with Paris Ouest Nanterre) and the Erasmus Mundus Masters Choreomundus (with NTNU, Roehampton and Szeged universities). Her research focuses on epistemological and theoretical issues in dance anthropology and on “African” dancing. Publications include Anthropologie de la danse: genèse et construction d'une discipline with Andrée Grau.
Guan, Jingqiu (The University of Iowa) The Protesting Arabesque (Sunday, 1330–1500)
Dance, utilized by leaders of China during Mao’s era as an effective tool to shape and centralize the country’s ideology, exerted immeasurable power to enact instead of solely reflect the social order. In this study, I examine Chinese revolutionary ballet through the specific angle of body politics and gender relations. In the light of the special political and cultural context, I contend that Chinese revolutionary ballet participated in the disruption of traditional social order concerning gender relations and transformed females into social agents who took part in the revolution through their corporeal manifestation on stage. The study elaborates that the use of ballet itself to exhibit corporeality was a direct-nonviolent protest against the suffocating history of Chinese females. The study uses Revolutionary Model Opera The White Haired Girl as an example to further illustrate how Chinese revolutionary ballet impacted Chinese females’ roles in the society through changing the plots of the story, creating an androgynous utopia, and demonstrating empowered female images and recalcitrant female bodies on the stage. Finally, the study points out that the ballet was able to achieve its performative efficacy through state propaganda that arbitrarily made it mass media.
Jingqiu Guan is currently pursuing an MFA degree in Dance Performance at the University of Iowa. As a dance performer, she has worked with various choreographers including Nicholas Leichter, Jill Johnson, Alan Sener, Jennifer Kayle, etc. She is interested in investigating how moving bodies in dance take actions in shaping individuals and the society and how this implication influences performers.
Hammergren, Lena (Stockholm University) Performing Multiculture: Nordic Perspectives on Dance, Region and Migration (Monday, 1330–1530)
This roundtable looks at the role of dance in relation to questions of multiculture in the context of ‘Norden’, here understood as “a space of shared histories and practices without limiting itself to (a) landmass” (Diana Taylor, ”The Many Lives of performance. The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics”. In J. Mckenzie, H. Roms & C.J.W.-L. Wee eds. Contesting Performance: Global Sites of Research, 2010, (p. 28)).
Featuring six members from the larger research group of Dance in Nordic Spaces (Inger Damsholt, Anne Fiskvik, Lena Hammergren, Petri Hoppu, Mats Nilsson and Karen Vedel), the roundtable departs from a live performance of the so-called ‘Folkevise-steg’ practice (Folk Song Steps). The roundtable next identifies shared points of convergence in the individual presentations that include topics on the global export of traditional Norwegian folk dance, the displacement of local dance practices in Sami communities, and ways in which different images of ’African dancing’ have arrived and been performed in Sweden. Other examples will focus on ‘the first dance’ of married couples in Denmark (representing different diaspora), the displacement, revival and tradition of the minuet in Norden as well as dance artists’ mobility patterns within and beyond the borders of the Nordic region.
Lena Hammergren is Professor of Theatre Studies at the Department for Musicology and Performance Studies, Stockholm University and Professor of Dance Studies at University of Dance and Circus, Stockholm. Her research focus is on dance history and cultural theory. Her recent publications in English include “The Power of Classification” in Worlding Dance (ed. S.L. Foster, 2009) and “Dance and Democracy” in Dance and the Formation of Norden: Emergences and Struggles (ed. K. Vedel, 2011). Since 2007 she is member of the Board of Directors, of the international organization the Society for Dance History Scholars (SDHS).
Hammond, Helena (University of Roehampton) Gergiev’s Sleeping Beauty (1890/1999) and Sokurov’s Russian Ark (2002): Towards a politics and poetics of the St. Petersburg danced total art work as performance of the past (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Dance is a conduit to St Petersburg’s Imperial past in Russian Ark, Alexander Sokurov’s art house film, shot in the Hermitage as a continuous 90-minute take. ‘I’ve forgotten all the steps but now it’s all coming back, now I remember’ observes the real-life figure of the Marquis de Custine in the film’s culminating re-enactment of the 1913 Winter Palace ball. Taking its cue from de Custine’s retrieval of courtly politesse and sociability through embodied memory of the mazurka, this paper illuminates dance’s role in co-opting St.Petersburg in post-Soviet performances of pre-Soviet Russia. It especially explores the film’s intertextual dialogue with another key danced repatriation of St. Petersburg’s Romanov history to the contemporary city — the Maryinsky Ballet’s 1999 ‘old/new’ recension of the company’s original 1890 Sleeping Beauty. The film’s ballgoers dance to the Maryinsky Orchestra and, applauding the theatre’s director-conductor, Valery Gergiev, they salute his authorisation of the 1999 production.
A century separates the ballet from its revival and Sokurov’s film, but myriad connections bind their privileging of historicity — especially, interpretation of history as Romanov history and shared status as total art works with concomitant historicising dimensions. This paper explores the post-Soviet danced total art work’s politics as ongoing, potent vehicle for performing history.
Helena Hammond is Senior Lecturer in Dance at the University of Roehampton. Her forthcoming monograph (Palgrave Macmillan) considers historical representation in dance. Publications include on the Ballets Russes and French historiography ( Ballets Russes: The Art of Costume, National Gallery of Australia, 2010); Royal Ballet and Bloomsbury ( Ninette de Valois: Adventurous Traditionalist, Dance Books, 2012); contributions to Fifty Contemporary Choreographers (Routledge, 2011) and New Approaches to Neapolitan Culture: The Power of Place (Ashgate, 2013).
Harlig, Alexandra (The Ohio State University Department of Dance) The Madison Rises Again: History and Community at Columbus Ohio’s 1960s Dance Party (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
Like many dances of the last century, The Madison, popular in the 1960s, has a rich and contested history. Some place the famous line dance’s inception in Detroit, in Cleveland, or in Baltimore on The Buddy Deane Show. Some even claim it for Columbus, OH where, more than fifty years later, it has recently become an integral part of the monthly “Heatwave” 60s dance party. Every first Saturday of the month, around midnight, the DJs drop the Ray Bryant Trio’s 1959 “Madison Time” and dancers fill the stage waiting for the cue —“hit it” and begin, in unison, following the called steps. In this paper I consider the journey The Madison, a non-repeating one-wall group line dance, has taken from the record hops of the 1960s to the all-vinyl hipster gatherings of the 2010s. The version practiced at Heatwave, re-constructed and taught by Glaviano, is both the next transformation in a long line of revivals and recreations and an index to the popular culture and kinesthetics of the moment of its inception. Pieced together from articles, kinescopes, movie clips, and live performances available on the Internet, and made coherent through Glaviano’s choreographic innovations and intuitions, The Madison is back in Columbus.
Alexandra Harlig is pursuing a PhD in Dance Studies at The Ohio State University, focusing on popular dance. Throughout her research the themes of the urban, global, and cosmopolitan are in constant negotiation with the (re)localization of widely disseminated forms, and the physical and social marginality of innovative populations. She is particularly interested in the role of traditional and social media in the cycle of development, dissemination, and appropriation of popular forms.
Heller, David F. (University of Hawaii at Manoa) Rave-On! (Sunday, 1330–1500)
For the last quarter century an underground music culture has spawned generations of dancers. Within the last ten years, this scene has exploded into a worldwide phenomenon. Simply put, the world of the RAVE: Renegade Alternative Venue Event, is no longer underground. As I examine this issue, my combined background in journalism, my graduate studies in dance ethnography, and my spiritual and physical embodied practices within Rave culture help shape my insights. My methodology also includes a close reading of dance enthnographer Dwight Conquergood, whose writings support my findings. In order to bring more clarity of Rave Culture to the public’s eye, codification is one way to help facilitate change in which the way the culture is presented, so that it is not recycled in commercialization, or used to sell products, or cast aside as primitive. Spread by social media and filtered by mainstream media outlets, elements of this once taboo culture now grace the presence of cell phone and car commercials. Like Hip Hop, too often the stereotypes of Rave culture are exploited in the media and consequently confuse the mainstream public. When music and dance styles from Rave culture reaches the mainstream, the culture is transformed into a product.
David Heller, 31, discovered breakdancing in his hometown of Mahattan, Kansas in 1999. Later he discovered the Midwest RAVE scene where he embodied more dance styles including popping, tutting and liquid. His love of dance shaped his journey through countless performances, writing projects, and his thesis on Rave Culture. Currently working on his MA in dance at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, Heller ultimately plans to earn his PhD.
Helmersson, Linnea (Rff-sentret, NTNU, University of Science and Technology, Trondheim) The enthusiasts and the dance heritage – about the revival of traditional dances in Sweden (Monday, 1100–1230)
Today’s vibrant Swedish folk dance scene is, to a great extent, a result of the works of non-professional researchers and enthusiasts in the 20th century. Through their work traditional dances from all over Sweden were documented, reconstructed and revitalised. Until now, very little first-hand information has been available on their work and folk dancers of today have many conceptions regarding tradition and authenticity. Many dancers are even unaware of the fact that the traditional dances have been revitalised. Furthermore, there has been little academic discussion concerning the processes of revitalisation and reconstruction of traditional dances in Sweden. In the recently published anthology Eldsjälarna och dansarvet I have brought together articles on the processes of revival. The enthusiasts write about and reflect upon their own research, while other articles are written by myself and others based on interviews and source material. In a discussing chapter, the work and methods presented in the texts are analysed in relation to theories on tradition, authenticity and gender. Several different approaches to traditional dancing and research can be distinguished. The varying backgrounds, perspectives and motivations of the enthusiasts have influenced their interpretation of the material and the way the documented dances are presented and transferred.
Linnea Helmersson is editor of the book Eldsjälarna och dansarvet [The enthusiasts and the dance heritage] (2012). She has an education in ethnology, dance studies and gender studies. She currently works at the Rff-senter in Trondheim as a project leader in a practical folkdance project. Her main research interests are social dancing, tradition, gender relations in dance and social interaction on the dance floor.
Holt, Kathryn (University of Hawaii at Manoa) “Order and Dynamism”: The Paradox of the Irish Dancing Body (Sunday, 1530–1730)
One of the most recognizable aspects of Irish step dance technique is the posture. While the dancer often performs fast, intricate, and difficult footwork in the lower body, the upper body remains rigid, with the arms never leaving the sides. This posture remains most common in the competitive form of Irish dance. While the theatrical and social versions of the dance tend to be a bit more lenient – allowing the use of the arms, for example – the posture still remains upright with very little movement in the upper part of the body. By looking at the posture through the lense of the theories of postructuralism and Michel Foucault’s work on discipline and punishment, this paper will explore the ways in which the posture of Irish dance acts both as an embodiment of the discipline and control of bodies, and an embodied social action used by the nationalist movement in Ireland in response to colonization and the postcolonial, diasporic nature of modern Irish identity.
Kathryn Holt is an MA student in Dance with a focus in Culture and Performance at the University of Hawaii at Manoa where her thesis work will focus on contemporary Irish dance choreographers in the United States and abroad. Her research interests include Irish step dance, diaspora, place and identity, and dance for film.
Hoppu, Petri (University of Tampere) (Monday, 1330–1530)
This roundtable looks at the role of dance in relation to questions of multiculture in the context of ‘Norden’, here understood as “a space of shared histories and practices without limiting itself to (a) landmass” (Diana Taylor, ”The Many Lives of performance. The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics”. In J. Mckenzie, H. Roms & C.J.W.-L. Wee eds. Contesting Performance: Global Sites of Research, 2010, (p. 28)).
Featuring six members from the larger research group of Dance in Nordic Spaces (Inger Damsholt, Anne Fiskvik, Lena Hammergren, Petri Hoppu, Mats Nilsson and Karen Vedel), the roundtable departs from a live performance of the so-called ‘Folkevise-steg’ practice (Folk Song Steps). The roundtable next identifies shared points of convergence in the individual presentations that include topics on the global export of traditional Norwegian folk dance, the displacement of local dance practices in Sami communities, and ways in which different images of ’African dancing’ have arrived and been performed in Sweden. Other examples will focus on ‘the first dance’ of married couples in Denmark (representing different diaspora), the displacement, revival and tradition of the minuet in Norden as well as dance artists’ mobility patterns within and beyond the borders of the Nordic region.
Petri Hoppu is Adjunct Professor in Dance Studies and University Lecturer of Music Studies at the University of Tampere. His areas of expertise include theory and methodology in dance anthropology as well as research of Finnish-Karelian folk dances and Nordic folk dance revitalization. Since 2011 he is a member of the Board of Directors of the Congress on Research in Dance (CORD).
Hoshino, Yukiyo (Nagoya University) The Influence of Madame Mao on Revolutionary Ballet in China (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Generally, Jiang Qing (Madame Mao) held absolute control over National Ballet of China during the Cultural Revolution, in spite of her lack of knowledge about ballet. She changed various elements of the repertoire that she regarded as representative of a decadent bourgeoisie and sent many dancers to concentration camps. Particularly in Red Detachment of Women, Chinese Red Army, Jiang Qing gave orders about details related to the music, scenes, choreography, costumes, characters, and casting for certain roles. There is actually no notable research on Jiang Qing’s influence on Red Detachment of Women from the perspective of dance history. Thus, this paper offers criticism of the changes in Chinese ballet resulting from the control of Jiang Qing. First, we follow her education in the performing arts in her youth and her career as an actress in Shanghai in the 1930s. Then, we analyze her motives for changing the stage effects of Red Detachment of Women. Finally, we discuss how this work was used as a medium for political activism during the Cultural Revolution in China and how it was accepted in other countries.
Yukiyo Hoshino is an Associate Professor of Chinese Literature and Gender Studies at Nagoya University, Japan. Her research interests lie mainly in Chinese modern dance history. She is the author of Tai Ai-lien in anti-Japanese demonstrations: Focusing on her Relationships with Eugene Chen and Soong Ching-ling (2012) and has published essays on Chinese modern literature, Taiwanese movies and Chinese modern dance history.
Huskey, Sybil (University of North Carolina at Charlotte) Changing the Gestalt with Gizmos and Code: Amplifying Staged Dance with Interactive Technology (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
Real-time sensing technology, connecting the movements of dancers to the motions of projected visualizations, enlarges the kinetics of the proscenium space from the traditional horizontality of the stage floor to the enlivened verticality of the cyclorama. In addition to the kinetics, the size of the visualizations relative to the dancers commands attention in the upstage space while the dancers’ athletic and nuanced movements engage focus in the downstage area. This interaction of human dancing and digital projections extends the dimensions of traditional staged dance by creating multiple focal points of activity that complement, compete and connect with each other. As the visualizations “act” in simultaneous reaction to the dancers’ movements and spatial positions, a bonded kinetic gestalt stimulates visual perception, thus challenging choreographers, technologists, dancers and audiences to create and experience staged dance in new ways. Using research results from a three-year National Science Foundation grant, in which dances were collaboratively created by computer scientists and choreographers using various devices and specially coded software, the paper will ultimately pose the question: Does the use of integrative technology enhance or diminish the experience of seeing traditional staged dance or does it create a completely new genre?
Sybil Huskey, Professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, has recently been a co-principal investigator on a 3-year, $750,000 National Science Foundation/Creative IT grant researching intersections of dance and technology. The recipient of Fulbright Senior Scholar Awards in Finland and New Zealand, she has also been a Visiting Professor in Drama at Kingston University in London and President of the American College Dance Festival Association.
Hwang, Hye-Won (University of California, Riverside) Promoting Democratic Individualism: Re-valorization of “Laban” Methods in 21st-Century Korea’s Modernity (Sunday, 1330–1500)
In the 2010s, the use of “Laban” methods is no longer limited to Western contexts. By “Laban” methods, I mean the methods that offer analytical, documentary, and embodying strategies for the study of human movement, originated in early twentieth-century Europe. My paper focuses on western-developed “Laban” methods that Korean Laban specialists transported to Korea, and there, strategically adapted to South Korean contexts during the 1990s and the early twenty-first century when economic globalization and political democratization were sweeping the country. I particularly focus on some specialists who acquired “Laban” methods and credentials from U.S. and U.K Laban knowledge centers, and returned home and founded their own Laban institution -- The Korea Laban Movement Institute. At KLMI, the specialists have branded “Laban” methods as a “new” mode for public dance/movement education to promote creative, democratic, and well-rounded individuals in the contemporary Korean context. I argue that their re-valuation process does not aim to re-enact original “Laban” methods constructed in early to mid-twentieth century Euro-American contexts. Rather, they have re-negotiated western-developed “Laban” methods in relation to early twenty-first century Korea’s modernity in order to tactically challenge Korea’s past -- Confucian-based hierarchical authoritarianism and collectivism. By situating “Laban” practice in the context of global modernity instead of the singular notion of Western modernity, my paper examines how particular meanings, forms, and values of an embodied practice are played out for specific social groups.
Hye-Won Hwang was born in Seoul, Korea, and is a Ph.D. candidate in Critical Dance Studies at the University of California, Riverside. She has studied and performed ballet, modern dance, and Korean dance at several venues in Korea, the U.K., Italy, and the U.S. Hwang holds a B.A. in Dance from Ewha Woman’s University; a M.A. in Dance Studies from the Laban Center (the City University of London); and a M.A. in Dance Education from New York University. Hwang is a certified movement analyst, a Dean’s Distinguished Fellow, a Gluck Fellow at UCR, and an International Scholarship Awardee from the Alpha Association of Phi Beta Kappa.
Ivanova-Nyberg, Daniela (Independent scholar) Choreographer as a Culture Hero? Bulgarian Folk Choreographer and Bulgarian Folk Dance Tradition Today (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Choreographer as a Cultural Hero? investigates the role of the Bulgarian folk choreographer as a transmitter and disseminator of Bulgarian traditional dance. It first overviews the period 1944-1989, during which the folk choreography institutions, professional and amateur ensembles were established, nurtured and blossomed. Second, it outlines the folk dance scene in the interim period of political and economic transition, then focuses on the powerful recreational folk dance movement that arose after 2007-2008 as an alternative to the “traditional” ensemble form, still directed by professional choreographers. This paper is based on extensive field research where “being in the field,” to a great extent, means “growing up” in the field. It combines research methods from the fields of dance anthropology and ethnochoreology, incorporating an historical approach. The notion of cultural hero is used in a metaphoric way, indicating the choreographer’s responsibility during the past decades in transmitting folk dance culture. This began by adapting traditional patterns for stage, inventing steps, and creating a new genre. The role of the choreographer today, ways in which old traditional dances are becoming new repertoire in the Bulgarian context are a theme for evolving, ongoing investigation.
Dr. Daniela Ivanova-Nyberg’s background descends from the fields of arts and humanities (Choreography, Bulgarian Philology, Philosophy and Cultural Studies). She completed her PhD at the Institute of Art Studies, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. Dr. Ivanova-Nyberg has conducted extensive field work in the Balkans and has taught and lectured throughout the US, Europe and Asia.
Jackson, Naomi (Arizona State University) The Ethics of Presenting Dance Acts through New Media; A Comparison of Dances for an iPhone and the Legion of Extraordinary Dancers (LXR) (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
Our paper addresses ethical tensions in presenting dance through new media. It interrogates notions of equity, dignity, and integrity related to two case studies: 1) Dances for an iPhone, a low budget series launched in 2011 by Richard Daniels. The series features familiar names in the modern/postmodern canon (YouTube hits average under 1000); 2) John Chu’s big budget web series The Legion of Extraordinary Dancers (LXD) shown on Hulu starting in 2010. The episodes highlight dancers from underground street culture who specialize in hip hop, krumping, and popping (YouTube hits reach over 90,000). Drawing on theories from ethics, dance for the camera, and dance/cultural studies, we illuminate both reactionary and progressive tensions in these case studies. While Dances for an iPhone engage new media to provide visibility/honor for older dancers, the series remains a limited extension of traditional modern dance as displayed through the choice of well-known choreographers/performers, and reliance on standard funding sources. With the LXD, access/respect is provided to little known street dancers, and new media’s potential to move dance out of theaters into diverse locations is effectively utilized. However, the commercialization of the LXD challenges Chu’s utopian aims to transform presenting acts into egalitarian global exchanges.
Naomi Jackson is a tenured Associate Professor in the School of Dance and was recently named a Lincoln Scholar by the Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics at Arizona State University. She is the author of Converging Movements: Modern Dance and Jewish Culture at the 92nd Street Y (Wesleyan, 2002). Her writings also appear in a host of publications including Contact Quarterly, Dance Chronicle, Dance Research Journal, and Dance Research.
Järvinen, Hanna (Lecturer, Performing Arts Research Centre, The Theatre Academy, University of the Arts, Helsinki) Some Steps Towards a New Pedagogy of Dance History (Sunday, 1330–1500)
In this paper, I will focus on the challenges to a historian’s identity in a practical pedagogical environment of an arts university. I argue that in dance, which is often begun at an early age and where practitioners rely on their teachers for an “oral history” of the past of the art form, the obligatory history classes should integrate the practical interests of the students (their sense of agency) beyond the often expensive practice of reconstruction. This requires a redefinition of dance history as a discourse constantly constructed anew and re-evaluated, a discourse which is corporeal and embodied as well as written. The pedagogical principle of this history - or rather, genealogy in the Foucauldian sense - should be in assisting the student to learn to unlearn: to question beliefs and aspects of their practice they have thus far taken for granted. For the teacher, this principle requires openness about our (institutional) positions of power, both restrictions imposed by curricular demands and our cherished canons of art. I address some of the methodological and practical insights that artistic research in dance offers for historiography and the pedagogy of history.
Dr. Järvinen currently works as a Lecturer at the Performing Arts Research Centre of the Theatre Academy of the University of the Arts, Helsinki. Her interests revolve around questions of historical changes in the epistemology and ontology of dance and she has published in e.g. The Senses and Society, Dance Research, Dance Research Journal and Discourses in Dance.
Jerome, Kathleen R. “Sincerely yours, Sergei Marinoff” An Exploration of Femininity and Pedagogy in the Sergei Marinoff School of Classic Dancing Manual (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
In many ways the 1920s were a time of empowerment for women in the United States. The suffragette movement marked the 1920s as a time where working, middle, and upper-class women worked as one unified group towards gaining the right to vote. Popular culture during this period often conveyed ideas about what it meant to be a modern woman. For example, with women’s transition into a more public realm, beauty products became important to a woman’s image. The purpose of many of the images from popular culture sources, including ads and women’s magazines, was to target a marketable audience. The idealized images of women were complicated by the fact that they were economically motivated by the desire to sell products to women. Absent from existing scholarly literature is an examination of how dance, as an embodied form of culture, constructs and communicates idealized views of femininity and female behaviour for commercialized purposes. For instance, dance manuals—publications directed towards people interested to teach themselves how to dance—were commercial enterprises, but also are important conveyors of information about gender roles. One such dance manual in circulation during the 1920s was the Sergei Marinoff School of Classic Dancing. The student is to follow the fifty lessons beginning with basic ballet training and finishing with mastery of choreography for five dances. Based on a reconstruction of the Spanish Dance from the manual plus a close reading of images and text, this paper will argue how the manual encourages female independence while it simultaneously constructs and conveys very stereotypical images of femininity.
Kathleen Jerome was awarded her BA Honours from Queen’s University in Kingston, ON where she had a play script published in Canadian Theatre Review (Vol. 147 Summer 2011). She is a MA student in Theatre History at the University of Victoria. She is particularly interested in gender relationships in dance, the interface between text and dance, and would like to expand research on Highland dance in Canada.
Jimenez, Pablo (University of Hawaii at Manoa) Transforming the Dance Researcher: Haitian Yanvalou and Maud Robart (Sunday, 1330–1500)
Yanvalou is a dance that belongs to the voudou Rada rite of Haiti. Maud Robart is a Haitian artist and researcher, who extracted yanvalou from its ritual environment to explore the relationship among creation, tradition and modernity. Robart turns our awareness from the external manifestations of such an art to an exploration of and study of inner impulses that produce them. In the summer of 2012, I conducted fieldwork for my investigation on the Yanvalou dance within the context of Robart’s work. In Maude’s philosophy, it is only after the performer has refined an observation and awareness of the dynamics between the body’s impulses and the mind that an understanding of the external manifestation in the form of a dance can become clear. This paper investigates how dance research may include the processes of transformation of agency and identity of the performer and the researcher. In order to understand Robart’s propositions, my attitude as a researcher had to be shaped by my ability to adapt and transform my notion and quality of observation.
Pablo Jimenez is a M.A. student in dance with emphasis in Culture and Performance at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The focus of his research is the function of dance in the construction and transformation of the dancer’s identity and agency. He studies Haitian dances with the Haitian artist Maud Robart. His research interests include ritual dances, performance, and the phenomenology of dance.
Johnsen, Christina Blicher (Research assistant and teacher at Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark) Dance as a movement culture in physical education (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
What appears to be the core features of a movement culture in the context of physical education where dance and expressive physical activities are practised by and taught to adults? Answering this requires a historical contextualisation and empirical studies of specific educational practices in the aesthetic-communicative field of physical education. This paper presentation will draw upon findings based upon participant observation with a phenomenological approach on specific cases. The analysis of the movement cultures is concerned with patterns of embodied social interaction organized into analytical configurations. Furthermore, comparisons to other practices are done, and it is a key argument of this paper that the movement culture in focus appears fundamentally different from the others especially regarding the configurations of “energy” and the “interpersonal relations” amongst the teacher and students. I will highlight, describe and reflect upon the findings on energy and interpersonal relations appearing in the specific institutional setting. What is “produced” by the movement culture in focus appears to be professional and, even more apparent, personal development through dance and embodied social interactions. I will touch upon and discuss the possibilities and challenges in facilitating these processes in the specific case relating this to its historical context.
  Christina Blicher Johnsen, MSc in Sport Science and Psychology, research assistant at the Department of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark. Teacher in the fields of dance, expressive activities and sport pscyhology since 2007. 
Johnson, Michelle (University of Hawai‘i at Mânoa) Dude Looks Like a Lady: The Otokoyaku’s Transformation in Japan’s Takarazuka Revue (Sunday, 1530–1730)
The Takarazuka Revue is a Japanese all-female musical theatre troupe that delivers a wide array of performances, including Broadway musicals, traditional Japanese plays, and Vegas-style dance revues. Performers are assigned a stage gender that, with rare exception, they stick to and perform as throughout their time with the company. Women who play female roles on stage are referred to as musumeyaku, while those who portray men are called otokoyaku. When comparing images of otokoyaku over time there is a palpable shift in appearance, from a look that seeks to completely portray a convincing male to a more “androgynous” aesthetic. This paper sets out to explore how the tradition of male portrayal in the Takarazuka Revue has developed over time. While the otokoyaku’s shift in appearance from “classically” male to more androgynous and almost feminine may have been instigated by the male authorities of the Takarazuka Revue, this different way of presenting themselves as “male” can in fact be seen as liberating and offering new opportunities for expression to the performers. Particular attention is paid to the reconstruction of the iconic The Rose of Versailles over time, and how male portrayal has evolved since its first performance in the 1970s.
Michelle Johnson received a B.A. in Japanese Language and Literature from the University of Wisconsin – Madison in 2009.  She first saw the Takarazuka Revue perform while living in Japan in 2005 and has since seen several of their shows, leading to her choice to conduct research on the company for her M.A. in Dance (Culture and Performance Studies focus) at the University of Hawai‘i at Mânoa.
Jung, Shing-Chin The Study of Developing the Warm-up for Ballroom Dance Cha Cha Cha in Adult Class (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
Ballroom dance in Taiwan has been developed over sixty years. Since 1990s, the dance was popularized to all ages. The learning of the dance was changing from social dance steps into international ballroom dance techniques. According to the researcher’s learning experience, the dance classes seldom began in a well warm-up. Therefore it encouraged the researcher to develop the warm-up for the dance. The aim of the research was to develop warm-up for ballroom dance cha cha cha in adult class at beginner level. The research referred to relative literatures and conducted data collection from the teachers’ journals, suggestions from observer, students’ feedback sheets. Through practical process and the data above, the researcher found that the warm up make students concentrate more during the class, which enhanced their learning in cha cha cha. Besides, with the somatic movement concept in warm up could improve students’ cognition of the body structure. The researcher also got a chance to think about how to use various teaching strategies, including verbal cues, imagery, the richness of teaching content and the respect of individual differences. It was a breakthrough for the traditional training, and the researcher gained a lot from changing and trying new methods.
JUNG SHING-CHIN, who received her BBA (International Business major ) from the college of commerce of National Chengchi University in 2009, is now a student in the Graduate Institute of Dance Theory, Taipei National University of the Arts, Taiwan, and majors in  dance education studies.
Karin, Vesna (An assistant at the Academy of Arts in Novi sad ) The dance practice of the Dinaric people in Vojvodina (Participatory and presentational dance context of the people from Kordun) (Monday, 1330–1430)
The Festival “To Our People and Descendants” held in the town of Bačka Topola (Bačka, Vojvodina) gathers the Serbian population hailing from the areas in and around Mount Dinara, now living in Vojvodina. The Festival presents on stage the material and spiritual culture of their land of origin. All participants of the Festival belong to a so-called KUD (Cultural-artistic society), the institutions which were founded since late ’40s and ‘50s of the 20th century all over former Yugoslavia in the aim of fostering the folklore that is applied to the scene. Within the Festival the various customs, songs, traditional dances are shown. As they have been taken out of the context and transferred to a new locative reference, they don’t have the same function it used to be once. On the other hand, the Dinaric people stil dance at the dance events such as wedding, but on this occasion they do not performed their homeland dances. This paper will explore the Dinaric dance practice in Vojvodina on example of people from Kordun (Croatia): in the participatory and presentational dance context.
Vesna Karin studied Ethnomusicology at the Academy of Arts, Novi Sad. Her master paper The Wedding Songs and Customs in Kikinda and the Vicinity was published in 2012. She is a PhD student at the Faculty of Music (Belgrade). She is writing her dissertation The dance practice of the Dinaric people in Vojvodina. Curently, she is an assistant of Ethnomusicology and Ethnocoreology at the Academy of Arts, Novi Sad.
Klein, Kelly (The Ohio State University) Ecological Consciousness through Somatic Practice in Community-Based Performance: Palissimo’s “Bastard” (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
This paper examines the rehearsal process and resulting choreography of Palissimo’s “Bastard” of the Painted Bird Trilogy, a community-based work that includes a large group of local community members as performers. In preparation for the performance, the choreographer Pavel Zuštiak leads a three-day workshop and rehearsal process informed by Feldenkrais somatic principles to engage inner awareness and sensation and enhance the participant’s experience of and interaction with the world. Performers are coached through somatic techniques to cultivate a “bird’s eye view” awareness of the group and a soft-body, echoing dance scholar Deirdre Sklar’s two “kinds of lucidity” in which we are able to undo dominant modes of being: in what I am calling distanced awareness, “one calls upon visual imagination to project across distances to ‘see’ the larger system”; in what I call intimate awareness, “one calls on proprioception, turning awareness inward to ‘feel’ one’s body as a continuum of kinetic sensations” (91). With attention to how these methods are utilized in rehearsals for Bastard, I argue that these embodied practices challenge the status of the autonomous individual, so prized in liberal democracies, through the development of ecological consciousness and explore the individual and social implications of these embodied practices.
After graduating from Wesleyan University with high honors in Dance and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Kelly Klein co-founded the environmental nonprofit initiative Pick Up America which performed the nation's first coast-to-coast roadside litter pick-up. She is currently a Ph.D. student at The Ohio State University studying somatic pedagogy, subversive performance, and activism in a cross-cultural comparative framework. She will be conducting fieldwork on activist performance throughout India this autumn.
Kohlmyer, Bliss (University of South Florida) The Extension of Intimacy: An Exploration of “Liveness” (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Historically, artists have mined technologies to explore new ways of moving, create new visual effects, and discover new ways to express oneself. In addition to many other aspects, the art form of dance is about the body and its relation to space. According to Marshall McLuhan, technology is an extension of ourselves. Because of its relationship to space, dance is the perfect arena for this extension to take place, not only through props, costumes, lighting, and other bodies, but also through prosthetics and digital technologies that allow for an organic body to manipulate an inorganic system. The fusion of the organic with the inorganic brings to the foreground an interesting debate in performance theory concerning “liveness.” Liveness has been a hot debate in performance theory since the incorporation of film footage into live theatre over a century ago. Two key theorists on either end of the debate are Philip Auslander and Peggy Phelan. I will use the work of Troika Ranch, a multi-media dance theatre company, and my own work to dive more deeply into this debate and argue that technology is capable of rendering a performance more “live” than less so.
Bliss Kohlmyer has danced and toured internationally with the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company, Sean Curran Company, Janice Garrett and Dancers, Robert Moses' Kin, and San Francisco Opera Ballet. She is the co-artistic director of project agora, a San Francisco based collective. She received her MFA in Dance from the University of Washington and is currently an Assistant Professor of Dance at the University of South Florida.
Kolb, Alexandra (Middlesex University, London) Political Action or Reaction(ary)? Trends in Contemporary Choreography (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
Performance practice is shaped in many respects by its socio-political environment. So can contemporary choreography truly claim to challenge the societal status quo by producing liberatory or transgressive work – as many of its exponents suggest – or is it enshrined in the logic of present-day capitalism and establishment culture? This paper examines current global tendencies in dance from a critical perspective. It focuses on works which depart from traditional creative processes of Western theatre dance by embracing participatory, immersive, or collaborative modes of performance. It applies late 1960s and ’70s performance theories to unravel the widely claimed connections between conventional theatrical processes, capitalism and political forms which propagate the status quo; comparing these with current trends in choreography in the changed sociopolitical landscape of the early 21st century. Using examples from various countries, the paper asks how and whether current aesthetic choices and creative working methods align themselves with developments in the modern market economy, globalisation and contemporary political ideologies; in particular the ever-present (albeit often implicit) discourse about democracy. This analysis reveals, but subsequently challenges the association of aesthetic form with political concepts; viewing choreographic developments through a theoretical lens drawn from writings on dance, politics, theatre and visual art.
Alexandra Kolb is Reader in Dance at Middlesex University and was Chair of Dance Studies at the University of Otago until 2011. She received her doctorate from Cambridge University and trained professionally in dance at the Academy of the Hamburg Ballet. She authored Performing Femininity: Dance and Literature in German Modernism (2009) and edited Dance and Politics (2011); also contributing to numerous international journals including Dance Research and About Performance.
Kolb, Alexandra (Middlesex University, London) Danscross/ArtsCross International Network: Translation and Exchange, the conversation continues (1) (Sunday, 1330–1500)
These two Roundtables address questions emerging from an ongoing collaborative project involving Beijing Dance Academy, Taipei National University of the Arts and ResCen Research Centre, Middlesex University. Danscross/ArtsCross has brought together an international group of artists, academics and audiences to reflect on how collaboration might work when extended and embodied, across the linguistic, cultural, geopolitical, and geographical distances between them. Roundtable One deploys a range of transcultural and transnational perspectives to explore relationships between artistic processes and wider associations activated by location and environment,proximity and contact, observing and engaging in a dynamic, catalytic exchange. Arguably, performance is always a dialogic, collaborative process - between artists for example, or between them and audiences. In Danscross/ArtsCross, dialogue becomes translation, and translation in myriad forms moves from the unconscious meaning-making that accompanies our everyday being-in-the-world, into the full focus of our attention . But through a process of exchanging, translating and interpreting the strange becomes familiar, and then the familiar becomes strange; our thoughts are less firmly anchored, we speculate on new linkages and associations. And then we return to the groundedness of the studio, the stance of a performer, the articulation of a gesture, the resonance of a moment.
Alexandra Kolb is Reader in Dance at Middlesex University and was Chair of Dance Studies at the University of Otago until 2011. She received her doctorate from Cambridge University and trained professionally in dance at the Academy of the Hamburg Ballet. She authored Performing Femininity: Dance and Literature in German Modernism (2009) and edited Dance and Politics (2011); also contributing to numerous international journals including Dance Research and About Performance.
Laakkonen, Johanna (University lecturer, University of Helsinki) Transnational Interaction and Dance at Hellerau: An attempt to trace the Hellerau Style (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
The performance activities that took place within the Neue Schule Hellerau and Schule Hellerau-Laxenburg are not often mentioned in written dance histories that tend to discuss choreographers who have ‘changed histories’. This paper explores the activities and repertoire of the dance group which performed under the names ‘Tanzgruppe Hellerau’ and ‘Tanztrio Kratina’ between the years 1922 and 1929. The core of the group consisted of the choreographer and director of the school’s dance activities Valeria Kratina and two Finnish dancers Annsi Bergh and Mary Hougberg. The school and its dance group are considered as one example of the transnationalism of early modern dance in Europe, and the paper explores the transnational and hybrid features that were present in the group’s work. The theoretical framework of the paper is influenced by the current discussion on transnationalism and cosmopolitanism.
Johanna Laakkonen is University lecturer of Theatre Studies at the University of Helsinki. She is currently writing a monograph on Finnish dancers who worked in Germany and Austria in the 1920s and 30s.  She has published a book Edvard Fazer and the Imperial Russian Ballet 1908–1910 (2009) and is the editor, together with Tiina Suhonen, of Weimarista Valtoihin  –  Kansainvälisyys suomalaisessa tanssissa (2012). She has also published articles on Finnish dance history, contemporary dance and dance policy in various publications.
Lenart, Camelia (History Department, State University of New York at Albany) Rehearsing and Transforming Cultural Diplomacy: Martha Graham’s Tours to Europe during the Fifties (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
Focusing on Graham’s tours to Europe in 1950 and 1954, and based on newly discovered documents and pictures from European and American public and private archives and collections, my paper analyzes the way in which performing dance and acting politics redefined and enlarged Graham’s career. Proving that Graham’s first European tours deserve the full attention of the dance historians, my work demonstrates that they were not only the first step in the “internationalization” of her dance, but also a time of redefinition of her art and her persona, and of the roles they played in the cultural competition of the Cold War. My paper also challenges the idea that Graham became a “major ambassador for America” only on the occasion of her 1955 tour to Asia. It demonstrates the way in which, during the first European tours, Martha Graham - who was having the approval of the American politicians in the process of designing their country’s “grand cultural strategy” and already receiving “the State Department’s blessing -” rehearsed and performed in Europe an avant-premiere of her new role to be started soon officially, that of a cultural diplomat of the USA.
Camelia Lenart is a doctoral candidate at SUNY Albany. Her doctoral dissertation focuses on Martha Graham’s European tours and the intricate way the European audience responded to them. Camelia Lenart presented in numerous national and international conferences, and her work was published in the USA, Canada, England, and Romania. She is the recipient of various awards, including a Mellon Fellowship from the Institute of Historical Research in London.
Leonard, Rachael McClellan (Howard Gilman Fellow at Jacksonville University, Artistic Director of Surfscape Contemporary DanceTheatre) Nonverbal InterACTion in Dance Invention and Performativity (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
This paper examines ACTions of choreographic invention and dance performativity as ACTions of non-verbal communication or… “recognizable embodied interACTion.” Dance invention evidences the universal idea that communication is at the root of every situation and that the language of the non-speaking body is both subjective and richly informative. Within the context of dance creation, there is interACTion with self, with others, between artists, with audience, and with the art itself. This paper highlights a philosophically empirical research study instigating dance phenomena and investigating nonverbal communication, meta-communication, and socio-physical subtext. The findings bring into focus the ideas of perception, intuition, inference, subjectivity, coalescence, and transference. The research also presents a forum for analyzing improvisation and socio-physical interACTion, clarifying creative objectives, and yielding honest experiences and corporeal outcomes. The creative choreographic forum offers discernable information regarding chronemics, haptics, proxemics, kinesics, memetics, semiotics, and epistemics and this paper discusses these categories of analysis, as well as an empirical conclusion that non-verbal interaction informs and augments the creative experience. It also suggests that erudite knowledge of this enigmatic layer of information strengthens practice, yielding more optimal choreographic interACTion and outcomes, also concluding that the illusive concepts of intuition, instinct, predilection, and personal aesthetic within the choreographic realm may be explained or substantiated by sociological, philosophical, ontological, and scientific concepts.
BFA in Modern Dance, University of Utah – Cum Laude MFA Choreography, Jacksonville University/White Oak - Summa Cum Laude, Howard Gilman Fellow Co-founder and Artistic Director of Surfscape Contemporary Dance Theatre Choreographer 80+ Original Dance Works Recipient of 10 Corporate and Governmental Grants Adjudicator for the American College Dance Festival Association (ACDFA) Master Artist in Residence (Dance) for Very Special Arts (Kennedy Center) Vice-President & Board Member of Volusia County Cultural Alliance 
Leung, Maggie (Theatre, Performance and Cultural Policy Studies, University of Warwick) Urban Tradition, Aesthetic Condition: Ballroom Dance in Hong Kong and the Politics of Aesthetics (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
French philosopher Alain Badiou regards dance “as a metaphor of thought”. What kind of thought does ballroom dance signify, and what does its aesthetic and socio-cultural development tell us about the city that cradles it? This paper starts with an analysis of the forming of urban social dances in the light of Badiou’s theory of event to illustrate how an everyday practice specific in urban setting nurtures an artistic “condition” for human beings to become subjects. The everyday is therefore not mundane; it is a situation in which the ordinary might transcend themselves and carry out events that sustain and develop an aesthetic tradition. The development of Ballroom dance in Hong Kong proves this hypothesis with its heyday and demise. The late 80s to 90s was the prime time for both social dance and the Dancesport, dancing was very much an everyday activity. Today, however, the problematic industrialization gears the dance solely towards Dancesport and shuns its everyday dimension. The lack of everyday spaces for the proliferation of the social tradition and professional practices and the craving for spectacles thus jeopardize both the tradition and aesthetic development of the dance.
Maggie Leung, PhD student in Theatre Studies at University of Warwick, UK. Current research endeavors to construct a history of ballroom dance in Hong Kong and examine how the everyday aesthetic practices of the public change the city landscape in the course of time. 
Lin, Chien Yu (Graduate Institute of Dance Theory M.A. Program Taipei National University of the Arts) Introduction on the Political and Educational Thoughts in Zhu Zai-yu’s Dance Notation Work Ren Wu Pu (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
This thesis is analyzing the political and educational thoughts of the Ming Dynasty by the background of Zhu Zaiyu and the Ming Dynasty, the music and dance of the Confucian thought, and Zhu Zaiyu’s ’s dancenotation work Ren Wu Pu. Furthermore, this thesis is also discussing the relationship between dance, politics and education.
There were several ways of Chinese dance record, such as Tang Dynasty dance spectrum and Dongba dance spectrum. However, the most outstanding feature of Zhu Zaiyu’s dance spectrum in Ming Dynasty was that it was based on the image of music and dance in the Zhou Dynasty, and combined with the music of the Ming Dynasty and Confucian thinking.
Zhu Zaiyu used the direction and posture of dance on behalf of the Confucian Virtue. He hoped that everyone learned the dance and get to know the Confucian thought through the practice. We can see political and educational thoughts of the Ming Dynasty through the dance.
Chien-Yu Lin has been involved in dance from the age of 16. She mastered Chinese in university. Now, she is studying dance theory in Taipei National University of the Arts Graduate Institute of Dance. Her study interests focus on dance history and special education of dancing.
Lin, Yatin (Taipei National University of the Arts, Taiwan) ArtsCross/DansCross as a Contact Zone for Corporeal Translation among Sinophone Dance Artists (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Artscross/DansCross is a transnational project consisting of artists and scholars from Europe, China, and Taiwan, committed to shared creativity and labor, resulting in exciting cultural collisions and intellectual exchanges.
Having taken part in two consecutive ArtsCross events in 2011 at the Taipei National University of the Arts (TNUA) and in 2012 at the Beijing Dance Academy (BDA), I am drawn to the transcultural phenomenon of how similar dance concepts can or cannot be “translated” across dancing bodies from different social/cultural backgrounds, especially in a “contact zone” situation, following the term from Mary Louise Pratt (1992).
Indigenous Taiwanese choreographer Bulareyaung (Bula) Pagarlava’s work “Warriors Beijing 2012” for ArtsCross/DansCross was developed from a previous version with TNUA dancers in 2010, but adapted to the new mixed cast from TNUA and BDA. Most BDA dancers are specifically trained in Chinese Classical Dance, Folk Dance, and/or Ballet, with almost no exposure to modern or contemporary dance whereas TNUA dancers are required to go through a balanced training incorporating concepts and techniques from both Western and non-Western disciplines.
In other words, I analysis how different institutional trainings have resulted in unique dancing bodies, regardless of the “shared” Chinese culture; and how the formerly colonial model of “contact zone” may be re-conceptualized within this three-way project.
Dr. LIN Yatin teaches at the Taipei National University of the Arts. She received her Ph.D. in Dance History and Theory from University of California, Riverside focusing on Cloud Gate Dance Theatre and Taiwan’s changing cultural identity. Lin’s recent articles have been published in: Identity and Diversity: Celebrating Dance in Taiwan (2012) and the Routledge Dance Studies Reader (2010, 2nd Ed.). She currently serves on the SDHS Board of Directors.
Lindgren, Allana C. (University of Victoria) With Glowing Hearts We See Thee...Dance? Nationalism and Dancer Activism in Canada, 1945–1957 (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
After the Second World War, artists in Canada lobbied for federal support for the arts in an attempt to participate in the country’s post-war prosperity. Although there is a growing body of scholarship addressing the socio-political and aesthetic implications of artists’ self-advocacy, none of this research explores or even acknowledges that dance artists were among the most energetic arts activists in Canada during this period. To begin to rectify this omission, this presentation examines mid-twentieth-century dance activists in Canada, querying their motivations, goals and strategies. By accessing archival documentation related to the most important activist events at the time, including the Canadian Ballet Festivals, the founding of the National Ballet of Canada and briefs on dance presented to the Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Science, it becomes apparent that Canadian dance artists and their supporters repeatedly and strategically aligned dance with nationalist ideals and rhetoric in their campaign to increase professional opportunities for performers. The manipulation of nationalism for political ends has had a long and troubling history. In this light, the Canadian experience provides an opportunity to consider the broader issues involved in using nationalism as a tool for arts advocacy.
Allana C. Lindgren is an Associate Professor in the Department of Theatre at the University of Victoria in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. She is the Dance Editor for the Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism (forthcoming), the author of From Automatism to Modern Dance (2003) and the co-editor of Renegade Bodies: Canadian Dance in the 1970s (2012). Her articles have appeared in a variety of journals, including Dance Research Journal and Dance Chronicle.
Lu, Yuh-jen (National Dong Hwa University) Dancing in the East Border of Taiwan: Performing Pilgrimages at Hualien Tzuhui Temple (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
This essay is to delineate various visiting spiritual-mediums’ dance improvisations at Hulien Tzuhui Temple in Taiwan. These Taoist shamans, or Ling-ji, are quite different from those of Tang-ji shamans who often perform divine miracles by bleeding stunts. The Ling-ji shamans regularly show their loyalty to, and communicate with, Golden Mother Goddess of the Jasper Pool by means of dancing and singing. As such, the population of Ling-ji shamans is growing far more than Tang-ji. Through intensive fieldwork at the site, I have examined following research questions: What is a dance made of spiritual agitation? If spiritual agitation becomes “witch dance,” why does it survive through modern time in the 21st century of Taiwan? To what extent, is religious performativity related to dance improvisations? How do Ling-ji shamans learn about dance? What does dance mean to them? What are patterns and social mechanism of Ling-ji’s dancing? The research will draw upon Victor Turner’s theory of ritual performance and Paul Willis’ concept of “grounded aesthetics” to re-view issues of common people’s dance vision in an open manner. The researcher prelimiarily found out that Ling-ji shamans have somehow dramatized their spiritual expressions through improvisational dance and moved toward a cosplay within such a religious context.
Yuh-jen Lu, formerly the Chairperson of Tourism Management Department at Shih Chien University, is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Ethnic Relations and Cultures at National Dong Hwa University in Taiwan. Her areas of research are cultural performance, bodily representation, and critical theory.  She won the Cynthia Jean Cohen Bull Memorial Award in 2002 for her dissertation from NYU and served as an editor for Taiwan Dance Research Journal.
Luján, Andrea (City University of New York) Dedications In Our Time: Lester Horton’s Tapestry of American Spirit (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
In 1953, Lester Horton debuted his final choreographic masterpiece titled, Dedications In Our Time, a suite of five dances that introduce their respective subjects: “Dedication to Jose Clemente Orozco;” “Dedication to Carson McCullers;” “Memorial to Hiroshima;” “Dedication to Ruth, Mary and Martha;” and “Dedication to Federico Garcia Lorca.” These seemingly disparate themes embody Horton’s empathic response to the American spirit after World War II—they invoke his ontological approach to choreography. Video evidence of the entire suite has not surfaced. In an effort to view the invisible, I refer to Horton’s writing, specifically his essay titled, “The Indian In His Native Art,” which reveals his reverence for the Navajo tradition of weaving. According to Navajo mythology, Spider Woman gave the American Indian the gift of weaving—the creative process of combining form, structure, and symbolism to produce a holistic, artistic expression. Similarly, Horton was endowed with the ability to create a complex tapestry of American sentiments. This historiographical evaluation of Dedications In Our Time analyses the artistry of Navajo weaving, examines Horton’s choreographic adaptation of this traditional art, and reveals how the seemingly disparate themes are intricately woven together by a common thread, the Pathway Thread—a gift for humanity.
Andrea Luján has danced with Rosa Guerrero International Ballet Folklórico, Ballet Folklórico Aztlan de Tejas, Ballet East Dance Theater, and other companies. She teaches traditional Mexican dance in New York and choreographs a hybrid of modern and traditional forms. Luján received her BA with honors in Art History from Columbia University and is pursuing an interdisciplinary MA degree in the Study of the Americas at City University of New York.
Magnúsdóttir, Sesselja G. (Dance History Teacher and Critic) The manifestation of Jazzballet in Iceland today. (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
The concept jazzballet/jazz/jazzdance is important when addressing dance history in Iceland. In the paper I will attempt to understand and define the concept as it is manifested in Icelandic reality today. The focus will be on the research questions that guide my exploration of sources in the search for material to construct an image of jazz for the purposes of dance history teaching and as a milestone when comparing jazz to other theatre dance styles. In the study I’m looking both on the educational and artistic qualities of jazz asking: What characterises jazz technique as presented at the JSB Art School of Dance and in the National Curriculum and how does jazz manifest itself in terms of location of performances, relationship with other art forms, movement quality and artistic expression? The paper draws on fieldwork conducted within the school which has offered jazz as its main subject for more than 45 years, and an examination of the National Curriculum Guideline for theatre dance, published by Ministry of Education, Science and Culture in 2006, prescribing education of 9-20 years old dance students.
Sesselja G. Magnúsdóttir is working on her MA thesis on jazzballet in Iceland as part of her NoMads. She works part time as a dance history teacher at JSB, Art School of Dance in Reykjavík and has been writing dance critic and articles about dance in Icelandic newspapers and magazines. Sesselja is member of the board of NOFOD.
Marian, Florica Drawing the dance. A journey through „gefaltet“, a choreographic concert by Sasha Waltz and Mark Andre. (Monday, 1330–1530)
Martin, Rosemary (The University of Auckland) Dancing in the streets: Dance and the Egyptian Arab Spring uprising (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
The Egyptian Arab Spring uprisings have incited, challenged and transformed dance performances in Cairo. The events of the Arab Spring have provoked Egyptian dance artists to make work that explicitly address the uprisings, or alternatively their work has subliminally shifted and changed due to these happenings. This research explores the work of Caironese dance artists, and examines how they have been affected by and have responded to the Arab Spring uprisings. This paper investigates how these artists have chosen to speak creatively about the socio-political context of the extraordinary situations that they have found themselves in, and how politics and protest have become entwined in their creative work. The research is based on in-depth ethnographic interviews conducted before, during and after the uprisings. Through the dance artists’ narratives the repercussions of these political events on their lived experiences are documented. Notions of cultural and political identity are explored, considering how this may be influenced by shifts in the hegemonic structures in the region.
Rose is a former dancer with the Royal New Zealand Ballet, who has also taught dance extensively within New Zealand and the Southern Mediterranean region. Her doctoral research critically reflected on international education in dance. Rose’s research and teaching interests include international education in dance; ballet technique; dance and post-colonial contexts; cross-cultural conceptualisations of the body and dance and identity. She has articles in Journal of Dance Education and Research in Dance Education.
Maxwell, Adeline (Université de Nice / Universidad Academia de Humanismo Cristiano) Resistance in Chilean Contemporary Dance: A Question of Corporeality, Scene and Politics (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
This work presents an analysis of dance not only as an artistic and corporeal practice, but also as an ideological one. In dance we can find numerous values ​​and questioning that intersect each other, putting into play discourses written in the body and in the scene. In addition, in this discipline we can also find an utopian character of transformation and resistance. The concept of resistance is key in this work. The use of this concept aims to understand the political history of domination and liberations of the body related to dance. In this paper I investigate specifically the work of certain artists and groups of artists within the Chilean contemporary dance. These artists explore in new expressive corporeal possibilities, differing from the dominant practices of this discipline, and create a sort of political resistance that happens mainly through the body. They also establish ruptures with hegemonic principles present in the Chilean history of creation in dance, principles that apply coercive strategies through the absorption ​​of hierarchy and idealization’s values of the bodies.
Adeline Maxwell teaches theory of dance in the Department of Arts at the University UAHC, Santiago de Chile, and is coordinator of the Corporeality and Performing Arts Research Centre, Chile. She is researcher at the Centre Transdisciplinaire d'Epistémologie de la Littérature et des Arts Vivants (CTEL), University of Nice, France, and at the Laboratorio Cuerpo-Arte (LACUA), University of Chile. Her current work concerns the concept of political resistance in contemporary Chilean dance.
Milazzo, Kathy M. (University of Surrey) Blackface Guineo Performances in Renaissance Spain: Sites of Minstrel Production and Nascent Racism (Monday, 1100–1230)
This paper examines blackface productions of the guineo, a dance recognised in Renaissance literature as emanating from the West Coast of Africa. Throughout the fifteenth to seventeenth centuries, white Spaniards performed the guineo painted with black faces whilst grotesquely exaggerating the dance’s Africanist movements in two prominent venues, in religious processions and on dramatic stages. This dance is examined in order to ascertain if pre-Industrial Age modes of production can be read as an early form of minstrelsy as it discerns strategies of power obtained by imitations of negro dance. The two spaces offer different perspectives on the guineo as a performative articulation which enables a multiplicity of discourses about race, morality, religion, and the State. This raises questions about the relationship between the Inquisition and blackface practice and possible seeds of nascent racism. Drawing on an analysis of minstrelsy as delineated by Eric Lott and an investigation of black theatrical speech (habla de negro) as investigated by Baltasar Fra Molinero, I will address the cultural strategies that functioned as a dominant figuration of black dance that both suggest and withhold the corporeal presence of black Spaniards through white appropriation of “blackness.”
Kathy Milazzo received her Ph.D. in Dance Studies from the University of Surrey.  Her publications include a chapter on Spain’s Tango de Negros for the Oxford Handbook Series, an essay on jazz and tap dance in Judith Bennahum’s textbook, The Living Dance, and several publications emanating from conference presentations.  She has been a Dance Studies Lecturer at the University of Surrey and the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque.
Miller, Kara (University of Hawaii at Manoa) Between the Lines: One Deep Breath (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
The reinvention of yoga in the U.S. in the 20th century worked alongside modern dance as a mediating force and continues to have a presence in dance practices today. Aspects of yoga are present in the dance community and practice through posture exercises in warm ups, approaches to the creative process of making choreography utilizing theories of space, and performance philosophies through understanding of the relationship of the mind, self, body, and breath. Yoga philosophy and asana practice discreetly contributed to the development of modern dance in the U.S. beginning with early dance pioneers such as Ruth St. Denis. What is missing in the written historical modern dance record in terms of the visibility of the influence of yoga practice? This paper reimagines contemporary modern dance as transnational phenomena through intersections with yoga and examines early modern dance, yoga literature, and films to trace the circulation of ideas in these two practices through points of contact and acculturation.
Kara Miller is deeply interested in the vibration of silence, forms that heighten awareness to being present in the moment, and acts of listening. In Hawaii she is listening to the ocean, sky, and wind to cultivate her emerging voice as a writer and artist in the Pacific. Kara is currently an Assistant Professor of Dance at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and pursuing her Ph.D. in Performance Studies at the University of California, Davis.
Minerbi, Mareva (University of Hawaii at Manoa) Tradition and Transformation: Tracing Dance Lineage (Sunday, 1330–1500)
How does one trace dance lineage? It is unlikely that a pure technique exists, but rather dance instructors infuse their dance teaching with a mix of techniques and somatic practices. In 2012 I interviewed one of my most influential teachers in ballet: Wiebe Moeys. This paper traces my dance lineage through the lineage of this instructor and investigates how he has made modifications in his teaching practice. Instructors recognize an importance of holding on to and passing on the traditions that are useful in dance training and feel the necessity to break away from ideas that are no longer relevant to their teaching practice. What do teachers choose to pass on and how will their teaching practices change and alter what dance styles and performance qualities their students perform?
Mareva Minerbi is from Honolulu, Hawaii and she is a first-year MFA student in Dance at the University of Hawaii.  She holds a BFA in Dance from the University of Iowa.  She has studied dance and performed in Italy, Hawaii and in the continental US.  She has taught ballet, modern, yoga and choreographed at the University of Iowa’s Youth Ballet and is currently a Teaching Assistant at the University of Hawaii.
Monteiro, Elisabete Alexandra Pinheiro (UTL- Faculdade de Motricidade Humana - DECSH (INET-MD and CEAP)) ‘They say I have to be creative but I’m stuck on my choreographic process’ (Sunday, 1530–1630)
This is an expression often used by dance students when they feel blocked in their choreographic process. The purpose of this communication is to present the result of a teaching-learning approach with the last year dance students. Our main research problem is: how does the teaching-learning strategy we identify as ‘reproduction-deconstruction-transformation-reinvention approach’ affects the ability of being creative? For the purpose of generating and communicating experiential knowledge – as a practice-based research purpose - we will demonstrate that this approach shows positive impact: in extending the experiential motor repertoire; inducing divergent thinking based on the same starting point, widening perceived possibilities. How students handled with the teacher’s provided stimuli, how they selected part of the material while searching different ways, seems the most interesting in this creative process and it is what we propose to experience, somehow, analyse and discuss in the lecture demonstration. Thus, we propose in this space for choreographic creation the same as for a workshop, ’in which objects are fixed, reused and transformed’. Behaviours like ‘affordance’, adaptability and variability will be discussed as an emerging line of research in ‘choreographic creation - from reproduction to production’ based on the deconstructed material as a tool for reinvention.
PhD in Dance. Master Degree in Educational Sciences. Dance professor at the University (FMH-UTL Portugal). Professor Advisor of Master and PhD scientific studies. Being in charge of several workshops all over the country and abroad: Dance Technique, Pedagogy and Didactics of Dance, Improvisation and Choreography. Speaker in national and international Dance Conferences. Instituto de Etnomusicologia - Centro de Estudos de Música e Dança (INET-MD/FMH) Research member. DaCi National Representative Member. Choreographer.
Morris, Geraldine ( University of Roehampton) Are Steps Enough? Reviving Petipa’s Sleeping Beauty (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Marius Petipa’s Sleeping Beauty (1890) played a central role in both the formation of the Royal Ballet’s dance style and the ideology of the Kirov ballet and in the past fifteen years the two companies have attempted to return to the ‘original’ work, as has North West Pacific Ballet All three companies constructed the steps from the Stepanov notation scores. There are significant discrepancies between these three versions, so which if any can claim to be Petipa’s work? Despite contemporary changes in aesthetic and to the performance of the danse d’école, I suggest that we need to identify certain elements if we want to understand the work. We cannot know how the dancers danced in 1890 but revivals of the ballet need to consider more than the steps; pace, motion and dynamic are also part of the work. Petipa and Tchaikovsky collaborated closely, so the faster metronome markings in the score are central to the choreography as are the steps.
In the following paper, I explore what it means to revive a past work, and consider what needs to be retained if we wish to uncover the past.
Geraldine Morris danced with The Royal Ballet Company and subsequently completed a PhD.  She now works as a Senior Lecturer at Roehampton University and has most recently published a book on choreographic style: Frederick Ashton’s Ballets: Style Performance Choreography. Her work is published in peer journals and she has contributed chapters to several books.  Geraldine is a frequent speaker at both international and UK conferences.
Moura, Margarida (Faculty of Human Kinectics – Technical University of Lisbon – Portugal ; INET-MD) Folk dances of Madeira Island: past histories, present realities (Sunday, 1330–1500)
Bailinho, bailhos or baile(s) refers to the madeiran choreographic genre, attributed to the traditional dances of the island. This designation includes all existing choreographic repertoire, chanted and / or danced at Madeira Island. Besides the countless dances that identify themselves as bailinhos (Bailinho da Madeira, Baile da Mourisca, Baile Pesado, etc.), there are other dances that despite assuming different denominations (Chamarrita, Sapateia, etc.) are also defined as bailinhos. Regarding the origin of bailinhos, it is believed that it dates back to the castilians, to the moors (instigators of the former portuguese dances) and to the Mainland Portugal influence. It is also atributed to the black population of Africa (slaves) the influence over the danced repertoire of Madeira Island, being inferred that the jumps and turns of bailinhos maybe recollections of the African batuque. The adaptation to the region demands and geographical conditions resulted in the bailinhos genre that remains till the present time. However, it is believed that Bailinho Pesado and Bailinho da Ponta do Sol are the most faithful representatives of the Moorish and black slaves, that Bailinho da Camacha and Bailinho de oito are a contra dance repercussion, and that Bailinho Corrido is the most characteristic of Madeira.
Moura Margarida, Ph.D. in Portuguese Traditional Dance is an Auxiliary Professor at Faculty of Human Kinetics (FHK) - Technique University of Lisbon, Portugal. She is responsible for several studies in the Master’s and Doctoral Dance domain and she Teaching Portuguese Folkdances at the university and at the community. She is coordinator of the undergraduate dance course at the FHK. She is research in INET-MD, Institute of Ethnomusicology: Music and dance research center. http://www2.fcsh.unl.pt/inet/indexeng.html
Mueller, Sophie Merit (Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz) Trans-acting a Battement Tendu: Tradition of Practice and Transformation of Bodies in Ballet Class (Sunday, 1330–1500)
The essence of ballet is bodily action in a highly complex and codified form. Therefore, it is especially dependent on bodies with specific abilities — bodies in a state of constant ‘able preparedness’ allowing them to serve as the ‘instrument’ of a dancer and ‘material’ for the choreographer. But for being able to work, the body must be worked on. Without competent bodies, there is no dance. Perceiving an art-’work’ in a practice theory perspective means analyzing the physical labor that underlies its production. The required abilities need practice. In the conventionalized, centuries-old setting of ballet class, bodies are intentionally integrated into and kept in the practice in concerted self-instrumentation; they are transformed by and according to the requirements of the practice. Examining the recruitment by a particular dance form in ballet class, the main questions are: How does performing practice-specific bodily doings and sayings transform the body? How does ballet class function as tradition here — and how is thereby the tradition of ballet preserved (and transformed)? An in-depth view is provided by ethnographic data, including ‘become the phenomenon’ of the researcher: Experiencing habituation with aware self-observation gains access to the ‘logic of practice’ often inaccessible because of its inherent limits of language and consciousness.
Sophie Merit Mueller studied Cultural Anthropology and Sociology in Tuebingen, Germany where she is now teaching at the Department of Sociology. She is currently doing her PhD in Sociology in Mainz, Germany. Her research and teaching focusus on practice theory, sociology of the body and dance. She is in the Practical Research Program DanceStudies at the International Center for Dance, Tuebingen where she also teaches Dance in Early Childhood (NDEO Standards).
Nilsson, Mats (Dept. of Cultural Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden) The displacement, revival and tradition of the minuet in Norden (Monday, 1330–1530)
This roundtable looks at the role of dance in relation to questions of multiculture in the context of ‘Norden’, here understood as “a space of shared histories and practices without limiting itself to (a) landmass” (Diana Taylor, ”The Many Lives of performance. The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics”. In J. Mckenzie, H. Roms & C.J.W.-L. Wee eds. Contesting Performance: Global Sites of Research, 2010, (p. 28)).
Featuring six members from the larger research group of Dance in Nordic Spaces (Inger Damsholt, Anne Fiskvik, Lena Hammergren, Petri Hoppu, Mats Nilsson and Karen Vedel), the roundtable departs from a live performance of the so-called ‘Folkevise-steg’ practice (Folk Song Steps). The roundtable next identifies shared points of convergence in the individual presentations that include topics on the global export of traditional Norwegian folk dance, the displacement of local dance practices in Sami communities, and ways in which different images of ’African dancing’ have arrived and been performed in Sweden. Other examples will focus on ‘the first dance’ of married couples in Denmark (representing different diaspora), the displacement, revival and tradition of the minuet in Norden as well as dance artists’ mobility patterns within and beyond the borders of the Nordic region.
Associate professor in ethnology, dealing with dance from an ethnochoreology and ethnomusicolgy persepective. Latest book publication Dans - polska på svenska, Dance - Polska the Swedish way from 2009.
Nyqvist, Katja (University of Roehampton) Embodied interactivity and algorithmic performance (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
Interactive art is closely imbricated with digital art, yet the genealogy of the term ‘interactivity’ derives not only from the history of computing but also from the participatory events of the 1960s. Acknowledging this dual history, this paper creates an interface between Janine Harrington’s interactive dance The Bridge (2012), and computer-based interactive art including Nic Sandiland’s Remote Dancing (2004). Both works are activated by an audience whose actions result in a ’programmed’ yet often unexpected response from the work. But though based on algorithmic processes, in which inputs are transformed into outputs through a set of pre-defined instructions, The Bridge involves no computers. Its focus instead is the relatedness between performers and audience: the actions and reactions of the embodied encounter. Digital terminology is given a physical referent: ‘algorithms’ are processed in the performer’s bodymind and an ‘interface’ is the relation between two people (an ‘inter-face’). In this paper, I draw on my experience of performing in The Bridge to explore what happens when a performer simultaneously engages with an audience member and rule-bound constraints; I analyse the challenges and potential of algorithmically-driven interactivity; and I reclaim algorithmic performance as a technique for activating audiences and provoking new ways of relating - with or without technological mediation.
Katja Nyqvist is a Finnish-born dance artist and Senior Lecturer in dance at University of Roehampton, London. Katja’s practice-led research explores the relation of body, movement and environment drawing on her experience in improvisation, somatic practices and choreology. Katja has been making and performing work for stage, gallery and outdoor spaces, and is currently collaborating with Sheep(s) as part of Chisenhale’s ‘Dance and the Homemade’ commission.
Oatley, Diane (Independent scholar) Becoming Gypsy: Moving like the Other(s) (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
In The Meaning of the Body philosopher Mark Johnson makes a case for the significance of movement in terms of the body processes he holds as essential to the generation of meaning and knowledge acquisition in physical interaction with the world, equally essential as language and cognition. The paper asks whether this theory then represents a basis for rethinking dance as political activism. The perceptions of women studying flamenco dance, a dance tradition often defined as “gypsy”, indicate that exposure to flamenco dance and culture leads to the undoing of received notions regarding embodiment and difference, but respondents did not relate this undoing to bodily engagement, movement acquisition or physical learning processes. To paraphrase Johnson himself then, what sensible difference to any-body does the theory’s truth make? By reading the historical evolution of the flamenco dancing body in performance, specifically in terms of Johnson’s focus on the emergence of thought in felt qualities, a revision of flamenco dance’s political implications and definitions of otherness emerge. A performative shift hereby occurs in the subversive potential of the flamenco dancing body, away from otherness as ethnic mythology to otherness as the imperfect body.
Diane Oatley has a Masters in comparative literature from the University of Oslo, with an area of specialization in gender issues and expressions of the body in poetic language. Issues of embodiment have been a consistent theme in scholarly and literary publications. She is an independent scholar, writer and translator and has since 2005 lived between Oslo, Norway and Jerez de la Frontera, Spain where she is studying Flamenco.
Oberzaucher-Schueller, Gunhild À propos Grete Wiesenthal. All of a sudden—Dance is Art! (Sunday, 1530–1730)
In June of 1907, Grete Wiesenthal left her position as a member of the ballet ensemble of the Vienna Court Opera – a secure job entitled to a pension. With her versatile classical training, she had mastered technical bodily skills, an as such she was esteemed as a dancer able to entertain, in the perception of he Imperial Opera‘s audience. This fact is suprising inasmuch as Grete Wiesenthal had the necessary technical ability for the demanded entertainment, but not what was deemed even more important at the time – the outward appearance expected of an Imperial Opera dancer. Not even one year later, Grete made her debut as a free dancer. By the time she left the performance venue – the Wiener Werkstätte cabaret Fledermaus – she had been elevated to an „artist“, in the eyes of Vienna’s elite. Moreover, the general opinion was that Grete Wiesenthal had demonstrated something new: dance per se could be art! How had this paradigm shift, unique in the history of stage dance, been accomplished?
Gunhild Oberzaucher-Schüller taught ballet history in Vienna, Bayreuth and Salzburg.
Østern, Anna-Lena (Program for Teacher Education, Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Artistic supervision by a choreographer as reference in development of aesthetic approaches to pedagogical supervision (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
The focus of the study is supervision in an artistic, collaborative process connected to a production working towards a dance performance for toddlers. The aim of the study is to describe the characteristics of artistic supervision in a choreographic process, and to juxtapose these characteristics with elements of pedagogical supervision in teacher education. The characteristics of artistic supervision challenge the prevailing supervision discourse in teacher education with bodily-founded supervision discourses in the arts. The problem formulation for the study is: What contributions to development of an aesthetic approach to supervision might be identified in a choreographer’s supervision in a collaborative, artistic process? In the production process under study, multimodality (Kress, 2010; Rustad, 2010) can be understood as the main artistic tool. A choreographic guidance close to a critical, cultural and postmodern dance pedagogy (Fischer-Lichte, 2008; Østern, 2009) as epistemological stance led to a collaborative production process. Some of the characteristics identified in the artistic guidance were corporeality, being very present in the situation, taking up ideas from the dancers, and an autopoetic loop where the choreographer and the performers inspired each other to creative collaboration. As a result of the study, Anna-Lena Østern juxtaposes the identified characteristics of the artistic supervision studied with how these are applicable to pedagogical supervision in teacher education. Østern argues that there is a space for vitalizing pedagogical supervision through an aesthetic approach, and also that there is space for identifying as knowledge the often subtle, embodied aspects that characterize artistic supervision.
Anna-Lena Østern is professor in Arts Education at NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.  She is the scientific leader of the Norwegian national graduate school for teacher education NAFOL (www.nafol.net). Her ongoing research focuses on arts informed approaches to learning and supervision. A recently finished research and development project combining arts and science is Storyline @quarelle (http://www.storyline-scotland.com/water.pdf. She is an experienced drama teacher educator and has taught drama especially within teacher education. She is also conductor in the playback theatre company Theatre Momentum in Trondheim.
Østern, Tone Pernille (Program for Teacher Education, Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Investigating the dialogical flow between choreographer and dancers in a co-creative choreographic supervision relation (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
The aim of the study presented here is to investigate how the choreographic material floats back and forth between choreographer and performers before finding its final form in a co-creative production process. Østern, in a double role of choreographer and researcher in the study, has studied the characteristics of a collaborative choreographic process through an explorative self-study (Lassonde, Galman & Kosnik, 2009). The production was a highly co-creative process working towards a toddler performance with three performers, led by a director. The empirical material consists of introspective logs by the choreographer, an interview with the choreographer conducted by another research team member and video observations. The study is a pilot for a larger study about choreographic supervision.
Macintyre Latta and Buck (2008) dialogue with Merleau-Ponty’s (1968) notion of “flesh” when they point out that the gap between student and teacher is enfleshed through embodiment. Østern defines the supervision relation created between the choreographer and performers as enfleshed in a similar way. She looks into that enfleshed gap and aims to articulate central aspects for the dialogical flow that characterises the choreographic supervision relationship in a co-creative production process.
Tone Pernille Østern (Dr. of Arts in Dance) is an Associate Professor in Arts Education at the Program for Teacher Education at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. Østern is also a dance artist, choreographer and dance teacher producing and teaching on the dance field in Trondheim. She is the artistic leader of Inclusive Dance Company (www.dance-company.no).
Pakes, Anna (University of Roehampton) Re-enacting dance: history in the present (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Recent interest in the phenomenon of dance re-enactment suggests it presents an alternative to reconstruction. Where reconstruction attempts to replicate the look of past dances, re-enactment is said to revivify old choreography, liberating its contemporary creative possibilities. But how, more precisely, does re-enactment differ from reconstruction? In its processes, its performed results and/or its theorization? And does re-enactment accomplish that with which it is credited? This paper critically examines these questions, drawing on a range of dance examples. The term “re-enactment” implies a connection with the contemporary practice of re-embodying historical events and practices (the American Civil War, the Battle of Hastings, late C19th domestic life, etc.). Re-enactors often report their impressions of getting closer to, even reliving, the experience of people from the past, though the historical value of their activity is contested, depending as it does on questionable assumptions about authenticity and the possibility of empathy with historical subjects. Does historical reenactment subjectivise history and thereby distort rather than deepening understanding? Is the same true of dance re-enactment? What, if anything, can re-enactment contribute to dance history as well as to the contemporary creative possibilities of the art form?
Anna Pakes is Senior Lecturer in Dance at the University of Roehampton. Her core teaching expertise and research interests are in philosophy of dance, particularly analytic aesthetics. Recent publications include work on phenomenology and dance, the mind-body problem in relation to dance, and the epistemology of dance practice as research. She is currently writing a monograph on the nature or ontology of dance works.
Passion, Maxx Social Media as a New Paradigm for Dance Making (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
Social media has changed the face of connectivity, and holds the potential to create a new generation of dance audiences. By using platforms such as Twitter and Facebook to create, document, and share both processes and results, dance makers are able to engage with an immediate network of contacts, but more importantly, reach a larger audience as our work is shared and curated across the Internet. Tools such as hashtags (#), calls-to-action for movement inspiration, and “share” buttons can be used in specific and meaningful ways that help create a community of active participants in our creative process. My research explores how the utilization of social media as a tool for dance making will simultaneously build one’s online network and offline audience.
Maxx Passion, an MFA candidate at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, originally hails from Brattleboro, VT. After receiving her BFA with Honors from the University of the Arts, she moved to NY, NY where she danced professionally in downtown and independent modern dance companies such as The Artichoke Dance Company and Edisa Weeks/DELERIOUS Dances, while also working with fellow dancers, actors, filmmakers and visual artists in collaborative group performance projects.
Payne, Ursula O. (Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania) Exploring the Tradition of Dance Reconstruction With-in Contemporary Performance Contexts (Monday, 1330–1530)
Dance reconstruction projects from the labanotation score or historical records provide a framework for students’ practical dance experiences. In this paper I will focus on two approaches to dance reconstruction linking African-American dance traditions and contemporary dance practices. The staging of Robert Battle’s Primate (2006) at the American Dance Festival (2012) drew upon distinct traditions in dance preservation and performance. How dancers perceive and interact with the stager determines the suitability of their understanding (of) and performance (in) the choreographic style reflected in Battle’s choreography. I will also reflect upon how personal history (of the stager, choreographer and dancers) and one’s own movement practice informed the interpretation and meaning of the dance notation score. Part two of this paper will describe a different approach to dance reconstruction which involves creating original contemporary dances (in collaboration with students), that are historically informed by archival materials, historical sites and concepts related to Dr. Primus’ creative process. The goal of analyzing these two approaches is to uncover the interrelationship between contemporary dance experiences (in-studio), the analytical frameworks of dance reconstruction and deepening student performers’ historical literacy in dance.
Ursula Payne, Chairperson and Professor at Slippery Rock University of PA, received her M.F.A. in Dance from The Ohio State University and is a Certified Movement Analyst. Ms. Payne’s choreography has been awarded four prestigious Pennsylvania Council of the Arts Choreographic Fellowships. Ms. Payne completed ten years of teaching at the American Dance Festival (motif writing, technique, the Primus Archive Project, repertory and co-directed the Young Dance School from 2002-2012).
Polimene, Andrea (Italian Association of Research in Dance (AIRD)) Imbalances, Fractals, Divine Golden Sections. The Butoh dance, through apparent contradictions, as energetic experience (Monday, 1330–1530)
Fractals are the geometry of nature, an order in the apparent chaos of life. They have a feature of self-similarity, like an internal compulsiveness, an unlimited expansion. These are also peculiar features of some types of images. In this case, those which can move our body and are used in Butoh, a Japanese dance. In Japan, the writing uses ideograms and in culture and relationship with everything, the role of the image is crucial. To understand what occurs in a dancing body is not easy, but it is necessary. To investigate the principles of creative movement requires to invade other fields of knowledge, becoming more and more aware of being part of a whole. The golden section represents, quintessentially, the balance in arts; but its mathematical expression, paradoxically, is a periodic number, that is, incomplete, imperfect. We meet contradictions, paradoxes, perfections, mathematics and nature because the dance is, of all art forms, the most absolute, having our own body as a tool: a tool that has to be fully understood, yet, in order to release it from pain and enable it to rejoice. We must consider the art of dance as a chance of deep knowledge, not only as entertainment. True ecstasy is knowledge.
Eclectic artist, graduated in painting from the Rome Academy of Fine Arts in 1985. She has presented exhibitions, video and theater and dance since 1984. Has been studying Butoh for 30 years as a dancer and now as a researcher. She lived in Japan and directed five international festivals of Butoh dance in Italy. Her Body care was staged (Rome, 2001) by the company of Dance Biennale, directed by Carolyn Carlson. She's member of AIRDanza.
Randall, Tresa (Ohio University School of Dance) Acts for Children: Dance, Play, and Innovation at Midcentury (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Dance education for children is an important component of the dance profession, and provides the lifeblood for many dance organizations, but is rarely examined by dance historians. This paper examines the dances and acts for children that Hanya Holm and her protégés Alwin Nikolais and Murray Louis made in the late 1940s and early 1950s, how they viewed their significance, and what impact these had on their subsequent artistic work. Although Holm is perhaps best known for her American musical theater choreography and Nikolais is known for his futuristic multi-media spectacles, this paper argues that their disparate styles were informed by their shared improvisational approach, abstract concepts of motion, and the playfulness of their dances for children. From puppets to magic acts, their work for children embodied a sense of experimentation with motion and with the act of performance. The paper draws on archival sources that document performances, pedagogical approaches, and dance theories. For Holm, Nikolais, and Louis, the acts of teaching and performing dance held the potential to foster social change.
Tresa Randall, PhD, is Assistant Professor at Ohio University and Director of Dance Studies for the Honors Tutorial College.  She has published in Dance Research Journal, Jahrbuch Tanzforschung, and New German Dance Studies.  She served on the Editorial Board of the Congress on Research in Dance as Proceedings Editor, on the SDHS Board as student representative, and the Ohio Arts Council as an adjudicator for awards in arts criticism.
Robinson, Laura (University of Surrey) ‘Dancing for your votes’: Concepts of value in U.K male street dance crew performances on televised talent show competitions (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
Street dance crew performances within televised talent show competitions, such as Got To Dance and Britain’s Got Talent, continue to capture the imagination of prime-time audiences across the U.K and internationally. They prompt viewers to engage with their favourite crews through the fiscal act of voting. With no set rules or guidelines, viewers extend the boundaries of their choreographic evaluation to include the mediated and spectacularised competitive format, which incorporates backstage interviews, judges’ comments and pre-recorded features of the dancers in rehearsal. Through an analysis of both the choreography and the wider television show production, this paper explores the construction of value within male street dance crew performances on UK televised talent show competitions. Using Sherril Dodd’s (2011) concept of ‘embodiments of value’ within popular dance, I consider the commodification of the male dancing body, the transformational journey of the contestants and the emphasis on the aesthetic of the dance form. The subjective valuing of these dance acts by audiences and judges also produces a series of dualities that are negotiated through both choreography and production; these include individuality vs. collegiality, labour vs. effortlessness and ordinary vs. extraordinary.
Laura Robinson is an AHRC-funded PhD candidate at the University of Surrey. Her research focuses on the concept of spectacle within male street dance crew performances on U.K televised talent show competitions. Publications include chapters in Bodies of Sound: Studies Across Popular Music and Dance (2013) and The Oxford Handbook of Dance and the Popular Screen (pending). Laura lectures at the University of Surrey, London Studio Centre and Kingston University.
Roos, Cecilia (Dans och Cirkushögskolan/ University of Dance and Circus) Embodied timing—passing time (Monday, 1100–1230)
In this paper I will discuss how traditions are re-enacted by dance revival and reconstruction. The starting point will be my experience of restaging choreographic works by the Swedish choreographer Per Jonsson (1956-1998) of whose artistic production I’m in charge. When you’re teaching repertoire that you have danced yourself to professional dancers, it’s obvious on a corporeal level how the understanding of qualities and dynamics of a choreographic material transform through time. It becomes very clear that the embodied timing of the movement material that you’re a carrier of belongs to the past. There are several reasons for this, but the one I will be focusing on here is how new techniques and the refinement of methods for processing a movement material leads to new ways of dealing with quality, dynamics and timing in a written material. In my presentation I will give examples from working with repertoire and problematize how new interpretations of a movement material reformulate the tradition and inform the present.
Cecilia Roos worked as a dancer and  rehearsal director before she was inaugurated as professor in interpretation 2008 at University of Dance and circus in Stockholm. Her main research field deals with the dancer’s practice and she is publishing two books in the subject during 2013. Besides her work at DOCH she gives workshops and lectures and she also work as a freelancing rehearsal director.
Rosen, Astrid von (Assistant professor of Art History and Visual Studies, at the Department of Cultural Sciences, University of Gothenburg) The Twilight Space of Dance-writing (Monday, 1330–1530)
In this paper, the notion of dance-writing will be explored through four theoretical concepts serving as directional indicators: exile, equality, exchange, and the essay. In the name of equality we can start reducing the placelessness of exiled dance research, by positioning ourselves as the sweating researcher (inspired by J. Rancière 1987). Going further, an exchange is not only a meeting or a confrontation; it is something far more difficult, because it is provocative at the same time as it creates the possibility of innovation (S. Todd, 2009). The essay, theorized as hybridity, an ongoing impossible attempt to unite “passion and science”, functions as an operational tool in the quest for knowledge and transformation. When performing the theoretically informed, critical as well as creative activity of dance writing, the researcher enters a twilight space. This essayistic laboratory causes affective activities to dance together with more detached approaches, thus creating a productive resonance where the love of knowledge can live, move and work. In the presentation, dance-writing will be worked through in relation to the practitioner’s (C. Roos, 2006) as well as the researcher’s dynamic knowledge processes, and connections will be made to empirical case studies.
A former classical and contemporary dancer, Astrid von Rosen is interested in the intersections of dance practice and theoretical formulation. Her current research centres on dance history and the development of theoretically informed ways of accessing past dance events and experiential knowledge. During 2013 she is publishing an article in English on "dance-writing". One major concern is to “stage the archive” in order to explore and rethink local dance as critical heritage. 
Rottenberg, Henia (Western Galilee College, Akko) The interplay between creating Hebrew culture in the British Mandate of Palestine and the dance of Yardena Cohen (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
Yardena Cohen (1910-2012), an Israeli choreographer and dancer, created and performed mainly during the 1930s and 1940s in the British Mandate of Palestine. This paper investigates her unique contribution to the development of Hebrew culture within the context of shaping and formulating of nation-state and national culture for the new Jewish Yishuv (community). My aim is to explore Cohen’s employment of ancient materials combined with formal frameworks inspired by German dance expressionism to rebuild new traditions that stretch back to Biblical times.
Henia Rottenberg is Program Leader of Dance Theatre, Department of Theatre Studies, Western Galilee College, Israel. Henia co-edited the anthology Dance Discourse in Israel (2009), co-editor of the anthology to be published Life of Creation: the Art of Sara Levi-Tanai (in process), and co-edited the Israeli magazine Dance Today (2008-2010). Her research interests are history and aesthetics of dance in Israel and dialogue between dance and painting.
Rouhiainen, Leena [keynote] (Sunday, 1045–1215)
As part of a tripartite keynote panel exploring Nordic dance research, this presentation explores the regional evolvement of phenomenological dance research. This scholarly orientation is introduced through an account of the author’s early engagement with it and what she has learnt during the past fifteen years. While the presentation offers a short overview of the locally increasingly strong approach, it simultaneously introduces some main tenets of phenomenology and phenomenological research. These include 1) its appreciation of subjective experience, 2) its descriptive approach, 3) its interest in embodiment and 4) its goal in delineating the constitutive structures of the objects it observes. The presentation points to the thematics that phenomenologically oriented Nordic dance research has addressed by nearly twenty researchers. By introducing choreographer Jana Unmüssig’s doctoral research project, it likewise points to some interlinks between phenomenology and artistic research in dance.
Professor in Artistic Research, Dr. Leena Rouhiainen is head of the Performing Arts Research Centre of the Theatre Academy, University of the Arts in Helsinki. She is a dancer-choreographer and dance scholar. Together with her artistic collaborators, she has received several national awards for artistic work in Finland. Since submitting her phenomenologically oriented doctoral dissertation on freelance dance artists, she has been awarded funding for several research projects by the Academy of Finland. She has published articles related to phenomenology, somatics and artistic research and dance. She is on the editorial boards of Nordic Journal of Dance and Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices and has co-edited Ways of Knowing in Dance and Art (2007) and Dance Spaces: Practices of Movement (2012). She has been the chair and vice-chair of the board of the Nordic Forum for Research in Dance (NOFOD).
Rustad, Hilde Marcel Duchamp and post-modern dance improvisation (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
In this paper I will discuss post-modern dance improvisation as tradition, and focus on how this tradition can be understood to be influenced by the work of Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968). The concept of tradition used in the paper is theoretically informed by Hans-Georg Gadamer (1900-2002) and Tore Lindholm. Traditions transform as time passes, they embody information which consciously or unconsciously may be known and acted upon by people who belong to the tradition in question. As time passes new information gets molded into, and becomes part of, the tradition. My research question is: In what ways may the work of Duchamp be experienced by dancers who practice dance improvisation and contact improvisation today, and/or in other ways be recognized as part of dance improvisation and contact improvisation as post-modern dance traditions? To answer this question I will draw upon the work of Sally Banes, Cynthia Novack, Ramsay Burt, and others. This paper can be seen as building upon my dissertation, which I defended in January 2013, and upon my experience as dance improviser and contact dancer, as well as upon the experience of other dance improvisers.
Hilde Rustad is a dance researcher and dance artist. The last years she has been employed by The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences where she wrote her PhD dissertation ”Dans etter egen pipe; en analyse av danseimprovisasjon og kontaktimprovisasjon som tradisjon, fortolkning og levd erfaring”. She has a NoMAds- master degree, and studied to become a dancer and choreographer at the Amsterdam School of the Arts (SNDO). E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Sabee, Olivia (The Johns Hopkins University) Choreographic Text and Avant-texte: Jean Aumer as a Case Study (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
Compared to film and video, or to modern dance notation, the nineteenth-century practice of annotating violon répétiteurs and creating notes to accompany them does not provide detailed choreographic information; without prior knowledge of the choreography, it would be very difficult to reconstruct a ballet with only these tools. However, perhaps more interesting than the choreographic information itself, these tools allow us to glean critical information about how, why, and on what basis ballets were restaged and transmitted in the early nineteenth century. In particular, in this paper I propose to focus on a few of Jean Aumer’s choreographic notes and sketches, exploring methods of re-enactment and transmission of dances in France in the early years of the nineteenth century and using these sources to investigate working practices and their implications on choreographic style.
Olivia Sabee is a PhD candidate at Johns Hopkins University. She received a BA in Romance Languages and Literatures from the University of Chicago in 2008 where she wrote her thesis on "L'après-midi d'un faune". Her dissertation focuses on the evolution of ballet's relationship with narrative and text. She is also Associate Director of MOVEiUS Contemporary Ballet, based in the Washington, DC metro area.
Sachsenmaier, Stefanie (Middlesex University) Danscross/ArtsCross International Network: Translation and Exchange, the conversation continues (2) (Sunday, 1530–1730)
As part of the international collaborative project Artscross my research angle has focused on instances observed in various rehearsal processes at the Taipei National University of the Arts in 2011 and the Beijing Dance Academy in 2012 with regard to how the ‘self’ was adhered to, as well as how it was activated in different choreographic practices. In addressing what might have been ‘exchanged’ in these projects, between practitioners from different places and training systems, I suggest what took place here was less to do with a passing on of something that is one’s ‘own’ to an ‘other’, but rather with how the encounter with an ‘other’ might have heightened individual practitioner sensibilities and ways of practising the ‘self’.
Stefanie Sachsenmaier (PhD Middlesex University, DEA Sorbonne Nlle, MA Goldsmiths College) is a lecturer in Theatre Arts at Middlesex University, London, as well as a performer and tai chi practitioner. She works as researcher in close collaboration with British choreographer Rosemary Butcher, and has published related articles and interviews. She has co-organised two symposia on collaboration in performance practice at Middlesex University in 2012 and 2013.
Schellow, Constanze (Institute for Theatre Studies Berne) “We have never been dramatic.” Some remarks on the staging of dance in the realm of the postdramatic (Monday, 1100–1230)
We have never been dramatic. Some remarks on the staging of dance in the realm of the postdramatic The concept postdramatic theatre coined in 2000 by German theatre scholar Hans-Thies Lehmann has become a widespread label for pieces that deconstruct theatrical functions such as ‘drama’ or ‘role’. He, like theorists of the performative in European theatre studies, made use of dance works as key examples for a critique of the ‘dramatic’. Obviously dance offers a particular potential for such an enterprise. But what do concepts like the postdramatic have to offer for an understanding of contemporary dance? Not as much, I want to argue, as dance’s seamless integration into the realm of such theories has suggested. Directly after Lehmanns book was published, Austrian researcher Helmut Ploebst first articulated his doubt whether a ‘postdramatic dance’ actually made sense, suggesting the term new choreography’ instead. My lecture will examine the staging of dance in theories like that of the postdramatic, moreover I want to discuss recent attempts to emancipate dance scholarship from such concepts in the context of the institutionalization of dance studies as a discipline.
Constanze Schellow is a dance scholar based in Basle. She graduated in Theatre Studies and Philosophy in Berlin and completed a Postmaster in Performing Arts in Antwerp. 2014 she finishes her PhD at the Institute for Theatre Studies Berne as a fellow of the Swiss National Science Foundation. Publications among others in Performance Research, Frakcija, tanzjournal, Theater der Zeit; artistic  collaborations with Antonia Baehr, Sara Manente and Doris Uhlich.
Schjønsby, Turid Nøkleberg (Phd. Teaching in Gjøvik videregående skole) Gesture as an instrument to understand and pass on early modern dance (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Early modern dance was at its peak about one hundred years ago. Symbolism was a great inspiration for innovative dance in the 20th century. According to the creators themselves, “the movement of the soul” was the core of the dance. How can we today understand the patterns of movement which were used in these dances? Many of these dance methods have been handed down as tradition, or reconstructed based on pictures, descriptions or copying of the masters. In my presentation I will introduce some selected dances which were created in the beginning of 1900, by Isadora Duncan, Ruth St. Denis and Rudolf Steiner. The manners in which the dances are handed down through four generations tell us something about what elements are central in the movement build up of the dances. Based on theories of gesture developed by Merleau-Ponty, Greimas and Lyotard, I will discuss how in the process of the handing down of these dance expressions, certain key elements will crystallize in the dance creators’ visual movement material. My presentation will contain videoed dance, photos and sketches. The methods are derived from textual analysis, fieldwork and interviews.
Turid Nøkleberg Schjønsby: PhD in modern dance from the University in Trondheim (NTNU) 2012 with Bevegelse og uttrykk: Gestiske strukturer i tidligmodernistisk dans. Cand. Philol. in Theater Studies from the University of Oslo in 1997, diploma in Eurythmy from Sweden and Netherland 1977. She taught eurythmy and theater for several years. Since 1998 her main occupation has been teaching theater history and drama at senior high school in Gjøvik.
Scott, Gregory (New York University) Helping Restore Dance in Western Aesthetics: Harmonia kai rhuthmos as “song and dance” in Plato and Aristotle (Monday, 1100–1230)
The importance of Plato and Aristotle in Western aesthetics is so well known to a university audience as to not require explanation. What is hardly known, though, is how often both Greeks use the phrase harmonia kai rhuthmos in various works, and how those words are almost always unfortunately simply transliterated as “harmony and rhythm,” as mere musical terms, rather than, I will show, translated properly, as “song and dance,” which is how Plato explicitly defines the terms in an apparently little-read part of his last work, the Laws. In this session, I take the audience through a few passages from both authors to demonstrate my claim. The moral of the story will be that anytime one sees the translation “harmony and rhythm” in Plato’s or Aristotle’s work, be it aesthetic theory or not, one should examine the surrounding context and make sure that dance has not been improperly removed in favor of musical approaches. (The presentation presupposes no knowledge of ancient Greek.)
Greg started dancing in Alaska, and studied at the San Francisco Ballet School and the National Ballet School of Canada.  After teaching ballet, he focused on aesthetics while finishing a PhD in philosophy.  He directed the doctoral program in dance education at New York University during the mid-‘90s and continues to teach The Art & Theory of Dance there.  He expresses himself kinesthetically now through Argentine tango.
Scott, Andee (University of South Florida) Light, Interrupted: Using Dance to Reveal Light (Monday, 1330–1530)
In 2012, I created a technology-mediated performance work, Light, Interrupted, to research the intersection between physical bodies on stage and non-traditional light sources. Using a projected animation I created in Adobe AfterEffects as the sole source of light, dancers both reveal, and are revealed, by various textures, patterns, and colors projected into the performance space. Light, Interrupted suggests a different way of looking at the relationship between light and movement, lending emotional impact to abstract constructions. Light is exposed when it is interrupted - intersected - by a body or an object. Depending on direction, texture, and color, light also suggests emotional intent. In this work, light is an active participant, rather than a supportive element; as the performers move through the animated shapes/textures, the intersection of performer and light becomes the driving force that directs the eye of the observer.Three video projectors are positioned off-stage: in the house, 1st wing stage left, and 4th wing stage right. The piece opens with dancers walking at various speeds within animated columns of white light. Performers begin to run in the opposite direction, becoming visible only when crossing the columns, creating a sense of ghosting. Visibility itself becomes a choreographic element and carries emotional resonance.
Andee Scott is on faculty at the University of South Florida.  Choreographically, Andee’s areas of interest include site-specific, multi-media, and aerial work. As a performer, she curated and performed Woman’s Work: Reconstructions of Self, subsequently touring works in Italy, as a member of Deja Donne.  She was a member of Sharir+Bustamante Danceworks, Austin, TX, and has performed with David Dorfman Dance and AlienNationCo., under the direction of Johannes Birringer.
Sékiné, Anaïs (Université de Montréal) The Worlds of Lindy Hop—Cultural Appropriations and the Politics of Joy (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
Borrowing Becker’s concept of the Art Worlds, the worlds of Lindy hop refer to the multiple signifying practices making sense of the dance today. LH is a social dance that first appeared in the late 1920’s in Harlem, and quickly became a craze in the whole (white) nation. Since the late 1980’s, the swing revival has constructed the foundations of a renewed subculture and community of practice. Relying on relics of segregated media and oral history, the identity of LH finds its unity in a sacred representation of joy. The cultural appropriation of LH is thus produced in a complex work of meaning, combining historical revisionism and ideological transformations.
Drawing on cultural studies (Hall, 1997) and dance literature (Desmond, 1997; DeFrantz, 2002; Gottschild, 1996;), my analysis uses an intersectional approach, examining the politics of LH through the axes of race, gender and class. Based on an extensive participant observation in the Montreal LH scene and at the international Herräng dance camp, this research shows that joy stands as a central convention for all social interactions. Rooted in the neoliberal system, the worlds of LH create space for an ethical encounter, and provide a source of community and social cohesion.
Anaïs Sékiné is currently a PhD candidate in sociology at Université de Montréal, and hold an MA in anthropology at EHESS (Paris). Her research interests are in the cultural studies, postcolonial studies, gender studies, intersectionality and anything related to the minority subject. Her thesis focuses the sociocultural reconstruction of lindy hop and the ideology and collective imagery that supports the idea of its "community". She is an active dancer and teaches locally.
Setenta, Jussara Sobreira (University Federal of Bahia) The Speech Act of Bodies: modes of doing dance and performance (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
This proposition discusses the idea of dance as a speech act of the body, organizing itself in a co-dependence between practice and theory. For that, it will be part of a discussion that treats the dancing body as thought, both propositional and politically invested. It will consider that in the production of dance/performance different modes of acting occur. Each one of them must be observed from how the body comprises and takes care of the perceptive information present in doing. In such doings different ways of dealing with the body operate. Thence, there is the possibility of discussing the distinct procedures and modes of enunciation. The enunciated speech act comprises the modes of artistic acting and action organized in practices so intertwined of experiences that they do not separate modes of being from modes of the world. Such experiences discuss ideas in the body. The body is then treated as the field of occurrence of propositions and critical reflections charged with artistic conducts in continuous process of making.
Jussara Setenta teacher courses Undergraduate and Graduate Dance in Federal University of Bahia. Researcher Co-Leader of the Research Laboratory Co-Adaptive (LabZat) / CNPq. Author of "The Tell-Making Body: Dance and performativity" - EDUFBA/2008. Organizing the "Catalogue of Research in Dance," EDUFBA (2010). PhD in Communication and Semiotics (PUC / SP), Master of Performing Arts (UFBA / PPGAC); Specialist Choreography (UFBA / Dance); degree in Bachelor of Dance (UFBA / Dance).
Seye, Elina (University of Tampere, School of Social Sciences and Humanities) Constructions of the past in words and movement (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
There is little historical evidence about the Senegalese Sabar tradition, especially about Sabar dancing, which is a social, largely improvised dance form. Even oral histories do not offer much insight into the development of Sabar dancing, and there are practically no historical sources to be found in archives. When trying to gain some insights into the past of the Sabar dance tradition, one is thus left with the descriptions of people on how they used to dance or saw people dancing in the past. These accounts are sometimes contradictory and often also quite vague statements emphasizing how ‘different’ everything was before. In any case, such statements construct images of the past of this tradition. Similar images of the past are also constructed in performances of Senegalese ‘ballets’, dance companies that transform the Sabar tradition to be presented on stage. These performances typically strive to an ‘authentic’ interpretation of the tradition, with the scenes set in an undefined past. This paper discusses these constructions of the past of Sabar dancing on the basis of my own fieldwork materials: What kind of a past is actually being constructed? How do these constructions relate to the social Sabar dancing of today?
Elina Seye works as an assistant in ethnomusicology at the University of Tampere, Finland. She is currently finishing her doctoral thesis on Senegalese sabar dance events, an ethnographic study about how the Sabar tradition, as well as identities and relationships are embodied through dance and music.
Shah, Purnima (Duke University) Dancing with the Goddess: Tradition and Social Transformation of the Garba Dances of Gujarat, India (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
My research focuses on the surviving ancient traditions of the garba dances performed as part of Goddess worship in Gujarat, India. This is the first of its kind ethnographic documentation of these ritual traditions contextualized in their social and religious settings, while they struggle to survive in the wake of the inevitable influences of modernity, industrialization and globalization in India. The garba is a circle dance, signifying eternity or the circle of life, ritually performed by women in Gujarat during religious festivals, honoring the great Goddess, Devi. Through this communal dance-action, the Goddess is invited to manifest her sakti or Primordial energies for the duration of the ritual period. In this paper, I provide an emic perspective of these ritual performances as a religio-cultural heritage, and their interconnectedness to women’s agency and social bonding. While a few varieties of the ancient garba traditions have endured within smaller communities by the relentless efforts of the community elders, other forms of garba have either transformed into modern disco-ized versions or have faded away. Synthesized remixing of garba songs set to the lilting melodies of popular upbeat ‘Bollywood’ music exemplify processes of transformation. Excerpts from my documentary film on this research will highlight my analysis.
Dr. Purnima Shah is an Associate Professor of the Practice of Dance at Duke University, USA. With a Ph.D. in Performance Studies, her research intersects interdisciplinary areas of Asian Dance-theatre, Ritual Performance, Gender in Performance and Indian dance in the diaspora. Besides publishing articles in various journals, she has recently produced, directed and scripted a dance documentary, “Dancing with the Goddess,” and has published a book on the devotional Dance-theatre of India.
Shay, Anthony (Pomona College) Revival of Tradition or Invention of Tradition? (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
Ethnomusicologists and Folklorists use the term “revival” to signify a dance tradition that is being performed by other than individuals native to the tradition, or to indicate the resuscitation of a tradition that no longer has native performers. In either case, the term carries the perjorative notion of inauthentic and impure. They often use this term to describe dances found in the repertoire of state supported folk dance ensembles. Using examples from the Moiseyev Dance Company and the Mahalli Dancers of Iran, I suggest that many dances labeled revivalist, are in fact invented traditiions. In this presentation I will suggest that we find a new term for these latter traditions, because they form a new genre of performance dance.
Anthony Shay is Assoiate Professor of Dance and Cultural Studies at Pomona College in Claremont, CA. He is the author of Choreophobia: Solo Improvised Dance in the Iranian World (1999), Choreographic Politics: State Folk Dance Companies, Representation and Power (2002), Choreographing Identities: Folk Dance, Ethnicity and Festival in the United States and Canada (2005), and Dancing Across Borders: The American Fascination with Exotic Dance Forms (2008), as well as editor and co-editor of three volumes and numerous articles.
Sikand, Nandini (Lafayette College) Confusion Around Fusion: The Slippery Slope of Choreographic Innovation in Odissi Dance (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Odissi, one of India’s eight recognized classical dance forms, has become increasingly globalized in the context of a neoliberal economy. However there has emerged a tension between varying notions of tradition, and a need to maintain fixity around its existing repertoire or margam (literally, pathway). Given these constraints, I look at how new works are produced and what constitutes innovation in a dance form that is frequently identified as a “traditional” one? Furthermore, how do individual dancers and choreographers (re)position and/or (re)work this “traditional” form in a global context? Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Bhubaneswar and New York and my own choreographic exploration, I examine a contemporary dance vocabulary that builds on Indian movement practices and Odissi classical training. Dance pieces that veer away from the traditional margam are often subject to critique both from within the Indian dance community and from western critics and audiences. Termed as, “impure,” “confused” or worse yet, “inauthentic,” I explore what is at stake for choreographers that create works seen to fall outside the parameters of “traditional” Indian dance. How do these choreographers manage to negotiate this terrain on a national and global scale and yet create new work despite these challenges?
Nandini Sikand is an Odissi dancer, filmmaker and anthropologist. She is the co-founder and co-director of Sakshi Productions, a neo-classical and contemporary dance company and an Assistant Professor of an interdisciplinary film and media studies program at Lafayette College, PA. Sikand is currently working on her book, Bodies, Bells and Borders: Choreographing a New Odissi Tradition.
Smith, Amy C. Unraveling the Sacrifice: An Investigation into Choreographing Death in Three Rites (Sunday, 1530–1730)
This paper explores danced death onstage through the investigation of three versions of The Rite of Spring: Millicent Hodson’s reconstruction and the choreographies of Pina Bausch and Martha Graham. The appeal of this piece, which has been recreated hundreds of times over the past century, arguably lies in the Chosen One, the unlucky victim who is sacrificed to the spring by her community. Choreographers and researchers have explored numerous aspects of the ritual, such as gender roles, violence, isolation, rape, self-sacrifice, and compliance, yet the choreographers’ choices of how to represent the piece’s final death have hardly been addressed. My research on choreographic representations of death, as well as an “appropriate” audience response, results from careful observation of each work and exploration of existing research. I also reflect on somatic and choreographic information imbedded in Hodson’s reconstruction of Nijinsky’s Chosen One solo, amplifying and troubling the act of research through bodily action. I conclude that when death cannot literally be represented onstage, the extensive draining of an individual’s life force accentuates the sacrificial act. The reenactment of this sacrifice serves as a reminder of the precious nature of life and the responsibilities of individuals within a greater community.
Amy Smith is a graduate teaching assistant at UNCG where she is pursuing her Master’s in Dance Theories and Practices. She received her B.A. in Dance and Chemistry from Connecticut College, studying with David Dorfman, Lisa Race, Shani Collins-Achille, Gabri Christa, and David Parker, among others. Amy is a freelance writer for Dancemedia, LLC. Currently, she is researching dance documentation and reconstruction and developing curricula for teaching dance writing skills.
Spalva, Rita ( MA Program director Dance pedagogy) Innovation in Choreography of Leonid Jakobson (Monday, 1100–1230)
To this day the name of choreographer the Leonid Yakobson (1904-1975) is known only among the dance professionals. However his ballets and dance miniatures, along with the surprising choice of imagery and ballet language, testify that Yakobson has been one of the most outstanding choreographers of the 20th century. His art, based on the experience of the Russian classical school of ballet, combines the early 20th century avant-garde principles (Yakobson was a student of Fyodor Lopukhov) with influences from the greatest choreographers of the Russian ballet (Yakobson was Boris Eifman’s teacher). Most of his plays were readily forgotten – he had been forbidden to stage plays in ballet theatres in the Soviet Union. The author of the article is familiar with the work of Leonid Yakobson, which she researched and analysed during her studies in Saint Petersburg (at the time Leningrad Culture Academy, Department of Choreography). This also coincided with an active period of creativity of Leonid Yakobson. Today this gives a unique possibility to analyse the innovation of Leonid Yakobson in the context of contemporary dance process development.
Rita Spalva (Latvia) is a professor at the Riga Teacher Training and Educational Academy and director of the Master’s study programme Dance Pedagogy. She is also a choreographer well-known in Latvia and she has obtained a PhD in Dance Pedagogy. Rita Spalva is the author of over 30 scientific articles and multiple scientific monographs (for example, Image and Dance Composition (2007), Classical Dance and Ballet in European Culture (2013). The schope of her scientific interests includes dance theory and analysis.
Spanghero, Maira (Associação Nacional dos Pesquisadores de Dança (ANDA)) The videogames in Cena 11’ choreographies (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
The position of the spectator, his behavior and his function is one of the principal vectors of the change in the production of knowledge in dance in the last century, which implied the establishment and construction of new understanding on the relation of physical space and the migration and occupation to other spaces, such as the digital and virtual environments. Upon observing the set of works of Cena 11, a group based in the south of Brazil, it is possible to recognize the continued interest in investigating and proposing relationships with the spectators, not as a theme in the choreographies, but as the understanding itself of what choreography is. According to this 20 years artistic practice, the exploration of the understanding of what choreographic composition can be becomes visible. The goal of this paper is to introduce and make explicit Cena 11’s relationship between dance and videogames and to reflect on situations of power that are established between the stage (dancers) and audience (spectators). The company has created choreographic procedures and interaction systems based on interfaces with video, videogames and other digital and electronic devices to deal with themes and issues such as control, personal limits, liberty, manipulation, domination, violence, and vigilance.
Maíra Spanghero is dance academic, curator and dance critic. Graduated in Psychology (1994), she received her MA (2000) and PhD (2005) from Catholic University of São Paulo (Brazil) in Communication and Semiotics studies. During 2009-2010, she was academic visitor at School of Arts in Brunel West London University where she developed the post doctorate research about Embodied Practices of Dance and Mathematics. She currently teaches at the School of Dance at Federal University of Bahia.
Speer, Kate (University of Colorado Boulder) Transcendence, Testifying, & Funkitivity: The Spiritual and Political Dimensions of Charisma in David Dorfman’s Prophets of Funk (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
When charisma is present in both performance and activism, it can be a manipulative and empowering catalyst to move an audience to action. Using American choreographer David Dorfman’s Prophets of Funk (2010) as a case study, this paper focuses on the construction and application of charisma both spiritually and politically to create active audience citizens, who are more critical of their actions in the world, perhaps even inspired to act after leaving the theater. Through a close reading of Dorfman’s choreographed text in conversation with Funk philosophy, the culture of the black Pentecostal Church, and theories of charisma posited by Joseph Roach and Max Weber, I will reveal how Prophets of Funk positions Funk composer and musician Sly Stewart as a charismatic prophet. Additionally, the work suggests that if charisma can be caught, like catching the spirit in Pentecostal worship, then there is the possibility for the audience to leave the theatre with their own charisma. Thus, this dance serves as an example for activists and artists alike that charisma is a potent and palatable method to shift their audience’s perspective so that it is in line with their message and to potentially ignite social change.
Currently an MFA candidate at the University of Colorado Boulder, Kate Speer has worked with such artists as David Dorfman, Odile Duboc, Gesel Mason, and Nathan Blackwell. Her choreography has been supported by the Puffin Foundation and she has received professional development opportunities from Dance Advance, a program of the Pew Charitable Trusts. Speer has presented research at UCLA’s Dance Under Construction Conference (2009), SDHS (2010), and CORD (2011).
Stranden, Marit (associate professor at Norwegian Centre for Traditional Music and Dance), Siri Mæland (NTNU), Ivar Mogstad (NTNU), and Sjur Viken (NTNU) Challenges in the revival process of Norwegian traditional dance and music from archive films (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
Dances are documented and archived at the Norwegian Council for traditional music and dance. A methodology was developed to access and interpret the action based knowledge in dances, including structural analysis and terminology adapted to the vertical movements important in the Nordic traditional dances (Bakka 1970, 1978, 2007a,b, Urup et al. 1988). The method is used in revitalization projects in collaboration with the local communities and for teaching dance. Embodying the analysis is an important part of the method based on hermeneutic interpretation. This makes the experience and ideals of the analyser important. The music-dance relationship challenges the revival process. The music can be omitted in the recording or played in a different style than today. This difference might be caused by the musicians’ interpretation of tempo and micro-rhythmical patterns like asymmetry, accentuation and accents. These concepts have been discussed mainly for traditional music but also for dance (Blom 1993, Johansson 2010, Kvifte 1999). The musical patterns probably have connections to the traditional dancers’ style of the vertical movements and rhythmical footwork like dynamics, forces, centre of gravity and balance. We will use archival sources of traditional music and dance, shown and embodied by us as a starting point for our theories.
The authors are co-workers at the Norwegian Council for traditional music and dance, Trondheim. Marit Stranden, associate professor, is education manager for the traditional dance in the bachelor program. Siri Mæland, assistant professor in traditional dance, is presently PhD student in dance studies, NTNU/ Université Blaise Pascal. Sjur Viken, master in musicology, is the project manager of digitalizing the archive material. Ivar Mogstad is assistant professor in traditional music.
Svarstad, Elizabeth Vertical patterns in Feuillet notation (Sunday, 1330–1430)
The Feuillet notation system gives the reader information through signs and figures on the dancer’s movement in space, the relationship between the dancers, dance steps and indications on timing with the music. The notation shows what to perform apparently in a detailed presentation. Although the process demands degrees of interpretation, it is a common notion that reconstructing dances from the Feuillet notation system implies a certain degree of objectiveness compared to reading dances described in words, for example. However, the notated dance material lacks information on details. Important in this project, is the details on how the feet and legs can execute the steps with a great variety in levels and duration of plié/élevé and the length of a step or a step pattern. This presentation will ask questions on the verticality in the dance. Significant elements, such as the «svikt», traced down from the traditional dance material, can be worth considering in the interpretation of historical dance. Through Professor Egil Bakkas system of svikt-analysis and Jan Petter Blom’s method, possible interpretations of the minuet-step given in treatises by 18th century dancing masters will be discussed.
Elizabeth Svarstad is a PhD-student at the Department of music, NTNU. She is member of the project Performing arts between dilettantism and professionalism. Music, theatre and dance in the Norwegian public sphere 1770-1850. She holds a BA in dance from The Norwegian College of Dance and a MA in Dance from NTNU. Svarstad is a dancer and choreographer in baroque dance.
Svendal, Sigrid Øvreås (PhD candidate at at the University of Oslo, Department of Archaeology, Conservation and History) Tradition – gatekeeper or facilitator? (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Tradition – gatekeeper or facilitator? Tradition is a form of cultural continuity one may lean on and refer to, but is it possible that a strong tradition can act as a barrier to innovation and development? In this paper I will explore whether a long dance history and a strong tradition can help a thriving dance development, or whether tradition can be said to function as a gatekeeper. I will focus on the three Scandinavian countries. In the 60s and 70s, major changes occurred in the Scandinavian dance scene: Modern dance and jazz dance became influental styles, and increased the diversity in the dance field. Denmark and Sweden have long traditions for professional stage dance from the 18th century whereas Norway has a long tradition for folk dance, but a shorter tradition for professional stage dance. But even though both Denmark and Sweden had long traditions, the American modern and jazz dance were received and given significance in different ways. I will look at the reception and significance of modern and jazz dance that emerged in newspapers and books, and discuss whether different receptions may be related to the existing traditions of dance in these countries.
Sigrid Øvreås Svendal (1979) is currently working on her Ph.D. thesis on American influence on Scandinavian dance art in the years 1950 to 1980 at the Department of Archaeology, Conservation and History at the University of Oslo, Norway. Her education includes a BA in dance and dance pedagogy and a MA in dance history.
Tahko, Tuuli (University of Roehampton) The dancer as a maker: interaction in the choreographic process (Monday, 1330–1530)
What is the role of the dancer in the making of contemporary dance? The relationship between a dancer and a choreographer is one historically fraught with questions of dominance and the use, and potential abuse, of power. The dancer’s role has often been that of a silent tool, an able body at the choreographer’s disposal – a position which many have found problematic. On the other hand, in recent years there has been a shift towards collaborative modes of making dance and other works of performing art. This paper examines the ways in which dancers contribute to the making of dance works by studying in detail the interactions taking place in the creative process. How do the dancers communicate with the choreographer and with each other, verbally and non-verbally, while creating, learning, shaping and performing material? What are the participants’ interactive preferences and how do they affect the process and its outcome? The paper draws on ongoing ethnographic fieldwork with a professional contemporary dance company. Observations from rehearsals and interviews with the participants will be used to explore the nature of collaboration and the agency of the dancer in the choreographic process.
Tuuli Tahko is an MPhil/PhD student in Dance Studies at the University of Roehampton. Her research focuses on communication in the choreographic process, particularly in contemporary dance. Tuuli trained as a dance teacher and also holds a BA and an MA in English Philology from the University of Helsinki.
Tercio, Daniel (UTL/FMH and INET-MD) You Shall Come Dancing With Us (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
This presentation will be focused on a Portuguese traditional festivity that includes dance performances: the festivity to Saint Gonzalo in the city of Aveiro, Portugal. The festivity introduces five days of partying including socialization rituals around the chapel and its surroundings, donations, fireworks, dances, concerts, and processions throughout the narrow streets. During the celebration period there is a wealthy display – that can be noticed by the food items that fill up the plentiful tables of the neighborhood and also in the contagious joy that sometimes leads to a provocative and transgressor behaviour. The believers can ask the Saint’s intervention to the match making of weddings and love affairs, or to the solving of arguments and amorous breakups, or even to the healing of maladies. The title of this presentation evokes one verse of the song dedicated to the Saint, referred to the so-called Dança dos Mancos (the limps’ dance). This dance, performed by some of the brotherhood members of the Saint, happens inside the chapel, as a private performance. The limps’ dance introduces the experience of disjecta membra and could be analyzed according the Backtin’s theory on carnival. Issues as local identity and intangible heritage will also be stressed.
With a background in Art History, Daniel Tércio holds also a PhD in Dance. He is currently a Professor at Universidade Técnica de Lisboa and member of the Board of Directors at INET-MD < http://www.fcsh.unl.pt/inet/> where he coordinates the research group Ethnocoreology and Cultural Studies on Dance. Tércio has authored several studies on dance and art, and his dance reviews appear regularly in the Portuguese press since 2004.
Tomic-Vajagic, Tamara Tomić-Vajagić (University of Roehampton (Lecturer in Dance Studies)) The devil in the detail: leotard ballet aesthetic, the dancer’s agency and the issues of revival (Sunday, 1530–1730)
The spare aesthetic of dances performed on bare stage and in the practice clothes in the second half of the twentieth century emerges as a specific lineage of leotard ballet, a sub-genre within the twentieth-century plotless dances. While on a first glance the minimal appearance may indicate simpler tasks in revivals, a closer look reveals that the smaller details become very exposed and thus significant in such works. This paper focuses on two aspects: the issues of the costume aesthetic, and on the finer details of the performer’s interpretation that stand particularly visible in these works.
The concealed costuming design seems crucially related to the overall choreographic idea, and any modifications open particular questions about the work itself, which is considered in the repertoire by Balanchine, Robbins and Forsythe. Likewise, when observing how a practice-clothes dance is embodied by different performers, a significant complexity about the work itself emerges. To illustrate, one example is in focus: the ‘Nora’ solo from Forsythe’s the second detail (1991), and contributions by several performers in it. Observation of the dancer’s imprint is revealed through subtler details of individual performances, but those, it is argued, have great implications for the readings and revivals of the whole work.
Dr. Tamara Tomić-Vajagić is Lecturer in Dance Studies at the University of Roehampton, London UK. Her doctoral thesis considers the creative role of the performer in late twentieth-century dance. Tamara's wider investigations combine her background in visual art with dance studies. She is curious about visuality as an aspect of understanding dances, and in this sense explores methodologies of dance analysis and visual culture in dance. 
Urrutia, Maria (West Chester University) In Absence: A Rumbera in diaspora (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Scholar and artist Mary O’Reilly Herrera writes on absence: “In some sense, all contemporary Cuban diasporic discourse and cultural expressions measure, consciously or unconsciously, against a central absence. That absence is the island” (O’Reilly Herrera 1). As an artist, who has never been to the island, I am constantly measuring my contemporary ideas of movement and work against those of other artist and scholars that have spent time in Cuba researching and experiencing firsthand the offerings of the island. In this paper I share my perspective as a Cuban immigrant that moves, researches and creates within the spaces in between – in the space of absence. This paper is contextualized through the creative process, and performance of my work In Absence. The work demonstrates, as well as, questions migratory ideas/experiences, while examining how my migratory body translates and transforms the information into a performance.
Cuban Born maria urrutia is currently an Assistant Professor of Dance within the Theater and Dance Department at West Chester University in Pennsylvania. She is a graduate of the MFA Interdisciplinary Arts  program at Goddard College. Her creative practice work expands into various disciplines’ including architecture, poetry, dance including Cuban rumba and America contemporary dance forms, and food making as an art practice.  She also holds an EdM, Dance Education Masters, from Temple University and a BFA in Modern Dance from The University of the Arts.  Her scholarly work, which focuses on Cuban rumba, has been presented in London, Toronto, Montreal and Edinburgh. Additionally her teaching of Cuban rumba in diaspora took her to Tokyo, Japan and Santiago, Chile.  As an artist she has worked with Cardell Dance Theater, SCRAP and Myriam Herve-gil. Her recent work In Absence has been presented at the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, and a curated show Indiscipline in Vermont. Please visit www.mariaurrutia.com
Vaghi, Katja (PhD candidate, University of Roehampton) Of Irregular Pearls: Baroque Influences in Jiří Kylián’s Work (Sunday, 1530–1730)
How can an historical period influence the production of a choreographic work? What are the references used and how are they used? Does the type of references selected change over one’s career? Is there such a thing as an historical period, or should we rather talk about a style, or even an attitude? What are the characteristics we are drawing on? These are only few of the questions I am dealing with in my research on Jiří Kylián. Kylián heavily draws on the baroque as a source of inspiration to rethink our contemporary society. Still not all references are alike. They do not work at the same level in the dances nor have the same influence on interpretation. Some are more obvious and works on more superficial elements (as for example costumes and props) others are less open and influence the deeper levels of the structure. Is it possible to differentiate and name these kind of referencing practices and how do these different kinds of references influence the construction of meaning? Following Oscar Calabrese (1992) and Mieke Bal’s (2001) examples, I shall bring examples from Kylián’s dances to explain how different types of references work and what their relationship to the baroque is.
Katja Vaghi is currently PhD candidate in Dance Studies at the University of Roehampton. She has a background in Literature and Linguistic (MA English Studies, Zurich University) and a formation as a modern dancer (Ballet Arts, NYC). Her interests lie in the relation between language and dance theories, and in the comic element, or what make us laugh, in dance. She is working as a freelance dancer and choreographer.
Värendh, Maria Race, nationality and the folk—Ernst Klein and his early ethnographic dance films (Monday, 1100–1230)
In 1926-28 the folklorist Ernst Klein at Nordiska Museet in Stockholm recorded 6 ethnographic films with dance which are considered important source material today. Klein was critical of the ballet-derived aesthetics and the lack of authenticity in the dance that was presented on stage as “folk dance” and articulated the difference between “folklig dans” and “folkdans” (traditional rural dancing and contemporary organized folk dancing) at an internationally early stage. From the 1970s folk music and dance revival and onwards Klein has had a great impact as a catalyst of ”new ideas” in the folk dance movement of Sweden and other Nordic countries, his films being rediscovered and his articles being republished. Klein was one of the first scholars examining traditional dance, worked at the largest cultural historical museum in Sweden in the 1920s and 30s era of racial biology and he was Jewish. Based on a study of archival material and an analysis of the articles, unpublished manuscripts and films of Klein this paper wishes to contribute to a more complex view on the work of Klein looking at his argumentation and films from the perspective of race, nationality and the folk and relating it to the context in which he worked.
Maria Värendh is a dancer and teacher of Swedish and Hungarian traditional dance, trained mainly at DOCH in Stockholm, the Hungarian Dance Academy in Budapest and NTNU in Trondheim. With a great interest in the early sources of traditional dance, Värendh has explored different methods of dance documentation and movement analysis, as well as the meeting points between traditional dance and moving images in an artistic context.
Vedel, Karen (University of Copenhagen, Department of Arts and Culture) Performing Multiculture: Nordic Perspectives on Dance, Region and Migration (Monday, 1330–1530)
This roundtable looks at the role of dance in relation to questions of multiculture in the context of ‘Norden’, here understood as “a space of shared histories and practices without limiting itself to (a) landmass” (Diana Taylor, ”The Many Lives of performance. The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics”. In J. Mckenzie, H. Roms & C.J.W.-L. Wee eds. Contesting Performance: Global Sites of Research, 2010, (p. 28)).
Featuring six members from the larger research group of Dance in Nordic Spaces (Inger Damsholt, Anne Fiskvik, Lena Hammergren, Petri Hoppu, Mats Nilsson and Karen Vedel), the roundtable departs from a live performance of the so-called ‘Folkevise-steg’ practice (Folk Song Steps). The roundtable next identifies shared points of convergence in the individual presentations that include topics on the global export of traditional Norwegian folk dance, the displacement of local dance practices in Sami communities, and ways in which different images of ’African dancing’ have arrived and been performed in Sweden. Other examples will focus on ‘the first dance’ of married couples in Denmark (representing different diaspora), the displacement, revival and tradition of the minuet in Norden as well as dance artists’ mobility patterns within and beyond the borders of the Nordic region.
Assistant Professor, PhD, Department of Arts and Cultural Studies, Section on Theatre and Performance Studies, University of Copenhagen. Recent publications include as editor and contributing author: Dance and the Formation of Norden (Trondheim, 2011) and Nordic Dance Spaces. Imagining and Practicing a Region (expected 2013) together with Petri Hoppu. Also contributing author to Hubert van den Berg et al. A Cultural History of the Avant-Garde in the Nordic Countries 1900 – 1925 (Rodopi 2012).
Walker, Elbereth (University of Hawaii at Manoa) Outside Cuba: How Location, Identity, and Performance Propel Afro-Cuban deity dances into the Future (Sunday, 1330–1500)
The Afro-Cuban deity dances of Cuba, like so many indigenous art forms, have changed over time with their introduction into other countries and the expansion of globalization. The questions explored in this research draw from my participant observations, literature reviews, and interviews concerning the impacts and effects of Afro-Cuban deity dances due to location, and public transmittance. Issues of cultural identity, authenticity and tradition are addressed from the Cuban and non-Cuban perspective of those living in the United States. These are the voices of the ever expanding global community of Afro-Cuban dance and culture. As a non-Cuban student, dancer, performer and teacher of Afro-Cuban deity dances this research hits home to my own concerns about the transmittance, usage, and respect of these deity dances as they travel and transform with the migration and globalization of those dancing them. Afro-Cuban culture has shown a flexibility and fusion with imposing external factors from their enslavement in West Africa, to their near elimination by Catholicism in Cuba. It is crucial that research such as this continues; increasing understanding and awareness around the Afro-Cuban culture as they are shared in countries and amongst communities distant from their origins.
Elbereth Walker, a graduate student at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, studies Culture and Performance Studies, with an emphasis on Afro-Cuban dance. In 2011 she received her BS in Botany from UHM and will receive her MA in 2015. Raised in Portland, Oregon, Elbereth was a member of the Afro-Cuban/Brazilian dance company, Axe Dide, for three years. Elbereth is multilingual, loves the arts, science, and working with children.
Walsdorf, Hanna (Collaborative Research Center 619 “Ritual Dynamics”, University of Heidelberg) Do the Rite Thing: Construction and Tradition of German/ic Sword Dance Histories in the 20th Century (Sunday, 1530–1730)
In the German-speaking world, the conception of sword dance history has been repeatedly changed and ideologically charged. As a guild dance, the sword dances originated in medieval times and were performed as ritual actions in relation to carnival customs. But in the course of the rising nationalism in the first third of the 20th century, this context was to be denied in favor of a new perspective: sword dances were now credited with being in a direct lineage of cultic Germanic weapon dances. Through this outrageous, but commonly accepted interpretation, the dances’ past was rewritten in a pro-Germanic way, negating their actual social and ritual context. In the 1930s and 1940s, no other folk dance was as popular as the “ancient” sword or knife dance, being connoted with qualities such as manliness, strength and pugnacity. Therefore, it was re-contextualized into Nazi conventions and festivities. The paper traces the ways in which German sword or knife dances and their use became Germanic and, in consequence, a political instrument of the Nazi regime, evaluating contemporary print resources. In addition, the question of these dances’ fate will be raised: What is their perception today? Who uses them when where and to what purpose?
Hanna Walsdorf is a postdoc research fellow at the Collaborative Research Center 619 “Ritual Dynamics” at the University of Heidelberg (Germany). She received her M.A. in Musicology from the University of Bonn (Germany) in 2006 and her Ph.D. in Musicology and Dance Studies from the University of Salzburg (Austria) in 2009 with a thesis on “Political Instrumentalization of Folk Dance in the German Dictatorships”.
Wang, Yunyu (Taipei National University of the Arts) Danscross/ArtsCross International Network: Translation and Exchange, the conversation continues (2) (Sunday, 1330–1500)
Using the methodology of Laban Movement Analysis (LMA), especially the application of the Weight Efforts, I will focus on how Beijing dancers in Beijing Dance Academy(BDA) use the body center related to the gravity is different from the dancers from the Taipei National University of the Arts (TNUA). This research compares the different training of the dancers, even though they are both Chinese and receive similar dance training in Modern Dance and Chinese Dance. The observation is based on the process in rehearsal as well as the visits to classes at the BDA during the three-week project of ArtsCross in 2012. As a Certified Movement Analyst, I intend to utilize the LMA tool to understand how dancers with different dance training respond to the request of different choreographers and how the center weight was used in performing the dance. The result should reflect the dance different use of center weight from dancers in China and Taiwan. My presentation will include DVD clips recorded from the final performance.
Yunyu Wang A certified Movement Analyst, Labanotation Teacher and Reconstructor. Wang is the founding dancer of Cloud Gate Theatre, Taiwan and has a MFA from the University of Illinois. Yunyu is the Professor at Colorado College and Taipei National University of the Arts. Her researches are in dance technology, restaging and movement analysis. She is the CEO of the Chin-Lin Foundation for Cultural and Arts and serves as the President of World Dance Alliance – Asian Pacific.
Wang, Xin (Beijing Dance Academy) Traditions have been Transformed (Sunday, 1530–1730)
I watched the first DansCross project in 2009 as an audience and joined the following Artcross/DansCross in 2011 and 2012 as a scholar. I witnessed the choreographers, who came from different cultural background, demonstrated some interesting differences in the same concept.
It was serendipity having the choreographers from the three cities, London, Taipei, and Beijing. Because in people’s mind, London represents the Western dance culture that leads the tidal current of art transformation. It’s always good at exploring and discovering new forms and fields. The works of choreographers from London were filled with changefuldesign.
Taipei plays a transmitter role due to the deep influence of cultural diversity, whose works are completely unrestricted.
Beijing is a well-known ancient and traditional city. We can easily find the Chinese features in works. However, the works of Artcross/DancCross were not really traditional dance. The dance still were labeled as traditions, in spite of the choreographers have absorbed many ways of creation and explored many new expressions. This is because Chinese culture is a kind of powerful introspective culture; it can melt down and digest others but always floats off that finally. In fact, those dance works, which were regarded as traditional culture, have been transformed in nowadays.
Ms. Wang Xin is an assistant professor of the Dance Studies Department of Beijing Dance Academy (BDA), who graduated from BDA in 2003, and got the Master degree in 2007. She is studying for a doctor degree in Peking University (PKU). Wang Xin has also served the academic journal as an editor and reviewer. In 2012, she was sponsored by China State Scholarship Fund to New York University (NYU) as a visiting scholar.
Wawrejko, Diane (Columbia College Chicago; College of DuPage) Daniel Nagrin: Dancing Agency in the 1960s (Sunday, 1530–1730)
Problem. American choreographer Daniel Nagrin’s dances of the 1960’s are examined as agency, defined by anthropologists (Hornsby 1980, 2004; and Williams 2004) as embodied expressions (Franko 1995) of social and political actions. I ask, “In what ways do Nagrin’s choreographic methods of ‘doing-acting’ affirm agency?” Approach. As a former student of Nagrin’s, I rely upon my chorographic studies with him supplemented by his written books (Nagrin 1994, 1997, and 2001), videotapes, critiques, and reviews to conduct a contextual analysis. Adapted post-structural models (Adshead 1988 and Kane 2003) are drawn upon to analyze Nagrin’s choreographic methods. The body-as-culture theories (Adshead-Lansdale 2007 and Desmond 1997) in which aesthetic, social, and cultural moments are constructed and embodied in the act of performance are useful to probe Nagrin’s use of agency-as-action. Purpose. I assert that Nagrin re-negotiates content rather than form as actions/agency. Unlike his contemporaries (Banes 2003), Nagrin’s use of specific embodied actions resulted in dances of the human condition that contextually reflected American values during the 1960s. Agentic themes emerge such as racism, work ethic, and political protest. Thus, my analysis challenges and problematizes ideas of what constitutes American dance modernism. It also provides insights into a non-formalist approach to choreography.
Diane Wawrejko teaches at two Chicago-area colleges.  She received a PhD in dance studies from University of Surrey UK and an MFA in modern choreography and performance from Arizona State University.  Diane performed with several ballet and modern companies, received numerous arts grants including a Fulbright, and served as guest artist, choreographer, lecturer in many countries.  She is an active member of SDHS and American Society for Theatre Research.
Wells, Christopher J. (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) Swinging Out in Sweden: African-American Vernacular Dance’s Global Revival and its Scandinavian Roots (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
In revival subcultures, dancers and musicians form tight bonds in the present by perpetually reconstructing the past through music and movement. This paper examines how Swedish social dance enthusiasts in the 1980s catalyzed the contemporary global revival of the lindy hop and other African American social dances. It chronicles these dancers’ shift from focusing on literal reconstruction through studying film to embodying the creative, improvisatory spirit of social dance through collaboration with the dance’s original Harlem practitioners. Through the author’s experiences dancing at this revival’s current cultural center–the Herräng Dance Camp in rural Sweden–and through extensive interviews with the camp’s participants and organizers, the paper illustrates that through this tension between literal reconstruction and creative freedom, participants create a shared pool of embodied knowledge and construct a common history built from traces of film clips and the vivid personal accounts of aging African American dancers. Today, the camp’s Swedish organizers act as cultural brokers, constructing and nurturing a global network of dancers, from Rio de Jainero to Beijing, to reinvigorate and advocate for this form of African American popular culture.
Christopher J. Wells is a PhD Candidate in Musicology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His dissertation research on Chick Webb, a bandleader in Harlem during the 1930s, focuses on Harlem lindy hoppers' participatory kinesthetic engagement with Webb's music through social dance. Chris is also an active dancer and dance teacher specializing in the lindy hop, charleston, and other forms of African American social dance.
Westwater, Kathy (Sarah Lawrence College) SHAKE/WALK Workshop (Tuesday, 1100–1230)
In fall 2011, while Occupy Wall Street unfolded at a remove, I conducted performance-based research at the Fresh Kills Landfill in New York City, once the largest landfill in the world and currently the largest landfill-to-park conversion. Developed in response to that direct engagement with the peripheral urban site, SHAKE/WALK Workshop speculates on physical and perceptual states that occur amidst the contingencies of environmental trauma and the precarities of economic collapse. Taking two everyday forms of movement, we will allow these forms to disorganize within, and to be disorganizing of, our bodies. This will lead us to understandings of function and form, and the creative and intellectual potential within experiential states of disorder. As we explore in solo, duet, and ensemble improvisations, moving periodically in contact and/or with eyes closed, lines between states of order and disorder will be at times stark and at others blurred. The sensations that arise within this unstable and unbound matrix range from relaxing to energizing, from disorienting to freeing. Wear loose-fitting street or dance clothing. Workshop material is designed to be accessible to all backgrounds and experiences.
A New York City-based artist/scholar, Kathy Westwater’s major works have explored the built environments of landfills and parks (“PARK”), phenomena of war and pain (“Macho”), and human and animal culture (“twisted, tack, broken”). She has also performed works by Simone Forti, Steve Paxton, Sally Silvers, and K.J. Holmes. Westwater teaches at Sarah Lawrence College and Movement Research. She holds degrees from Sarah Lawrence College (MFA, Dance) and the College of William and Mary (BA, Economics).
Whatley, Sarah (Coventry University) Thinking, moving, making; dance actions in real and virtual spaces (Sunday, 1330–1500)
In recent years, dancers and researchers have worked together to develop a range of tools for capturing, analysing and visualising dance. These contemporary forms of inscription utilise a range of digital technologies, often incorporating more traditional notation systems in projects that intentionally traverse analogue, digital and embodied methods of transmission. Such collaborations thus create new creative outputs, providing novel perspectives on the process of reviving, reconstructing and remaking dance. This presentation will focus on projects involving the UK-based choreographer Siobhan Davies, beginning with her digital archive (RePlay) and her subsequent move from more conventional theatrical productions to curatorial projects to ask: What role do digital archives play in the way in which an artist’s work is remembered, reconstructed and reused? How do artists respond to their own archives to reconceptualise their creative process and performance practice? How do new technologies intervene in the dance making process, in preservation and documentation, to question what constitutes the dance ‘event’? The focus therefore will be on the concept and reality of the archival process, and how digital technologies influence, shape and disrupt an artist’s creative strategies to consider how this actualizes new kinds of dance acts and actions.
Sarah Whatley, Professor of Dance, is Director; Centre for Dance Research (C-DaRE) at Coventry University, UK. Her research focuses on dance and new technologies, dance analysis, dance on screen, and inclusive dance practices. She edits the Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices, is on the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Screendance and is a member of the International Education Workgroup for The Forsythe Company’s Motion Bank project.
Whittier, Cadence (Hobart and William Smith Colleges and Integrated Movement Studies) Transforming Tradition: The Integration of Laban Movement Analysis and Classical Ballet (Monday, 1430–1530)
Traditional ballet pedagogy emphasizes outer form, technical mastery, and codified performance of the balletic vocabulary. There are, however, many ways to perform the classical steps. Giving dancers opportunities to make artistic choices during technique class expands the traditional training methods to include the “skills of interpretation, improvisation and co-authorship” (Salosaari P, 2001. 17). Using Laban/Bartenieff Movement Analysis (LMA/BF) in classical ballet training is one way to develop these skills. Integrating the somatic traditions of LMA/BF with the classical traditions of ballet pedagogy creates a classroom culture that fosters technical growth, self-understanding, and artistic exploration. Similar to other somatic approaches to dance pedagogy, LMA/BF emphasizes sensory responsiveness, perceptual awareness, and intentional action. As ballet dancers apply the LMA/BF theories to their dancing, they develop greater body knowledge and learn how to make a multitude of artistic choices when performing classical phrases. In order to experience this, Workshop participants will use the LMA/BF Effort and Shape theories to physically explore and analyze two intermediate ballet exercises. Participants will acquire an understanding of the relevance of LMA/BF concepts to ballet technique, practice making varied artistic choices, and experience different technical challenges within the same exercise.
Cadence Whittier is an Associate Professor of Dance at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, New York. She is also a Director and member of the faculty at Integrated Movement Studies and a guest faculty member in the Bill Evans Teachers Intensive in Brockport, NY. She received her MFA in Ballet from the University of Utah and her certification in LMA/BF from IMS.
Wiesner, Susan L. and Rommie L. Stalnaker (Independent scholar) Iterative Acts of Choreography: Dance, Data, and DNA (Monday, 1330–1530)
The art of dance is inherently multi-layered by virtue of the artistic idea being transmitted through corporeal action in space, yet the ARTeFACT Project demonstrates the added complexity of generating, capturing, and creating movement from data streams. The paper proposed herein considers the processes of iterative choreography and the inclusion of digital technologies into the choreographic process, the performance event, and subsequent research. An added element is the generational aspect of this research: the two choreographers are mother and daughter, a relationship that in itself demands consideration in the iterative process.
At the heart of this research are two dance works and the motion captured data generated by various body parts of the dancers in the first work, ’For Natalie’, being actualised in the subsequent work as new movement in Take 2. By capturing and sampling Take 2 we compared the data streams to reveal the traces between the works.
By using the motion capture technologies and collecting data from body sensors we are able to analyse performance data, deconstruct/reconstruct original performic events, create new works, and consider the impact of DNA on the process of dancing data.
Dr. Wiesner works with technology to pursue research into intersections of language and movement. She was awarded a Digital Innovation Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies in 2011 to study conceptual metaphor as a means of classifying movement using motion capture and image processing technologies. She has presented her work at several conferences that cover the digital humanities, arts, writing, performance theory, ‘big data’, and library science.

Ms. Stalnaker began working with the ARTeFACT project as a choreographer and research assistant and has continued on the project as both ‘physical manifestation’ (captured movement) and researcher, developing ontologies, analyzing dance works, creating the ARTeFACT Movement Thesaurus, and contributing to the analysis of metaphor and movement. Her research interests include muscle memory and movement analysis using motion capture as a means to studying embodied knowledge.
Wildschut, Liesbeth (Utrecht University) A performance as shared space of action (Tuesday, 0900–1030)
A performance as shared space of action Liesbeth Wildschut in collaboration with Arno Schuitemaker. Since the discovery of the ‘mirror neurons’, a lot of research related to the activity of these special brain cells has been carried out. Outside academia people like the Dutch choreographer Arno Schuitemaker became fascinated as well. For him, these mirror neurons are a source of inspiration, since this knowledge provides insight into the relation between action and observation (Iacoboni, 2008; Rizzolatti & Sinigaglia, 2008), and therefore into the relation between performers and spectators. Schuitemaker used this knowledge while working at The Fifteen Project (2011). The core of the performance is a shared experience of dancers and spectators. In my paper presentation I will give insight in which ways knowledge about mirror neurons played a role during the making process of The Fifteen Project, and in the empirical research in which I explored kinesthetic experiences of spectators watching The Fifteen Project. Earlier studies has shown that movement experience plays an important role (Calvo-Merino a.o., 2005). My research indicates that also performance characteristics and the way the choreographer and the dancers address the audience may intensify kinesthetic empathy.
Liesbeth Wildschut graduated at the Fontys Dance Academy and at Utrecht University (cum laude). She lectures in dance history, theory, analysis and dramaturgy at Utrecht University. For her PhD she analyzed the concept of kinesthetic empathy, using results from neuroscientific research and she explored this phenomenon further by empirical research involving children as well as adults. She is co-editor of Contemporary Choreography (Routledge, 2009) and Chair of the Dutch Society for Dance Research.
Wu, Meng-Hsuan (Student) Find the “Original”--- The Constructing Process of 1980-2010 Taiwan Street Dance Community’s Bodies and Identities. (Monday, 1100–1230)
From the ballroom, red-envelope pub show, television program in 1980s, Taiwan’s street dance one after another experienced associations of various street dance school clubs, dance crews, studios in 1990s, and gradually formed a big street dance community in Taipei, Taiwan after 2000s. The sub-culture feature of 1960-1980s street dance originated in U.S. had transmitted and transformed through the multiple media globalization, therefore generated the dance experiences and the main discourse that tangled with capitalism, consumption, media and official of Taipei street dance community. With the atmosphere of strong tendency of globalization and commercialization, the deformation of U.S.’s first generation street dance features had also formed the primary debates field in Taiwan: What is the “original” street dance. This paper based on Taiwan’s historical and social context which is differ from U.S., and using Taiwan street dance literature, existing video records, interviews, and Laban movement analysis method, in order to focus on how the development of Taiwan street dance corresponded with the transformation of Taiwan contemporary society in 1980-2010, and questioning how this big Taipei street dance community experienced the constructing process of the dance bodies and identity discourse.
Meng-Hsuan journey of dance began at high school through street dance, therefore opened her interest and passion to dance and thus afterward exposed her to contemporary dance and theater. Except dance practice, Meng-Hsuan also majored History in her college, and now is studying dance theory in Taipei National University of the Arts Graduate Institute of Dance.
Wu, Yi-chen (University of Exeter) How technology actualizes dancers’ interfacing with new media sets within a polaristic context of Qi: the case of Huang Yi’s SPIN (2010) (Monday, 1330–1530)
My goal for this paper is to build a philosophical framework, based on ancient Confucian scholar Mencius’ sense of Qi, for rethinking the spatial implications of dancers interfacing with new media sets, as shown in the Taiwanese choreographer Huang Yi’s SPIN (2010). The dancers’ live performances in SPIN are captured by a spinning camera and instantly edited into mirror images that are then projected onto screens, hung on the four auditorium walls. This setup emphasises not only the competition between the dancers and their mirror images over who will dominate the performance, but also their mutual referencing of each other’s hidden bodily and psychological spaces. In keeping with Mencius’ sense of Qi, I propose that this setup – the dancers “interfacing” with their mirror images – fosters a dynamic equilibrium between them. That is, the dancers’ stirrings by and responses to the images can be interpreted as the communal acts of rival but interdependent polarities. Working as the dancers’ equivalent selves, the images are necessary counterparts for sending and receiving the dancers’ psycho-physiological strengths.
Yi-chen Wu obtained her MA in Scenography [Dance] from Laban and MA in Sculpture from University of Southampton, UK. Since 2003 Wu has worked as a scenographer in Taiwan. Her design works aim to revive contemporary meanings of traditional folk art in Taiwan. She is now a PhD candidate at the University of Exeter, the Department of Drama, conducting a philosophical investigation of Taiwanese new media arts.
Wu, I-Ying (University of Northampton) A Daoist movement practice unfolding the continuous transformation of in-between states (Monday, 1330–1430)
This lecture-demonstration investigates the continuous process of transforming consciousness through sequential emergent movements and aims to take a deeper look at in-between states based on Daoism, a Chinese traditional thought involving the philosophy of qi-energy. I explore how motivation of movement shifts in the continuous transformation of in-between states, and how this transformation relates to the self informed by Daoism. This practice articulates with three Daoist notions: wu, wu-wei, and the self. In terms of this movement practice, wu can be thought of as an in-between state of being; that is, something as nothing or nothing as something, in which everything unidentified is still whole. Wu-wei can be understood as an attitude or a way to move in an in-between state of wu when movement is about to emerge. The self can be viewed as a felt sense of being now and here, which flows along with states of qi-energy. In this presentation, I will unfold the process of becoming wu-wei in the form of a sequence of emergent movements accompanied by my poetic voyages that uncover how the self changes. Moreover, I will discuss how this movement practice reflects Daoism and the meaning of the serial transformation.
I-Ying Wu is an improvisation practitioner and a PhD candidate at the School of The Arts, The University of Northampton. She investigated the cultural meanings of Contact Improvisation in Taiwan and obtained her MA in performing arts in the National Taiwan University of Arts. In her PhD study, she focuses on practice-led research on emergent movement informed by the Daoist philosophy of qi-energy.
Xu, Rui (Director of the Academic Affairs Office of Beijing Dance Academy) The “Cultural time difference” in Danscross/Artscross project (Sunday, 1530–1730)
The Danscross/Artscross project provides an interesting context for everyone involved: the choreographers, academics, dancers and audience. They are all from different places but they have been assigned to work together during a same period. We can easily see a “cultural time difference” between eastern and western world, which is implicated in choreographers’ works and causes the misunderstanding when we are trying to interpret it. For example, most Chinese dancers have the training background of “contemporary Chinese classical dance”, which is obviously a Chinese-inflected modernity and mixed times. The meaning of modern and contemporary in China is very confusing and different from western explanation. In fact, they both include the Chinese and western cultures, namely they are both a mixture of different cultures. Although there is cultural time difference, we can expect a new development of Chinese dance in a global context of diversity and refiguration of boundaries.
Dr. Xu Rui, dance scholar, stage scripter. Former chair of Dance Studies Department of Beijing Dance Academy (BDA). Currently the associate professor and the director of Academic Affairs Office of BDA, board member of Beijing Dancers Association and Beijing Art Critics Association. He got Master Degree at BDA in 2002 and Ph.D. at the China Academy of Arts in 2006. Visiting Scholarship winner of  the Asian Cultural Council (ACC) in 2005.
Yagishita, Emi (Waseda University (Ph.D. Student), Research Fellow of the Japan Scocetry for the Promotion of Science ) Isadora Duncan’s Adopted Daughters, the “Isadorables” : Their Activities and Characteristics (Monday, 1330–1530)
In the history of dance, Isadora Duncan’s name is very well known, while those of her adopted daughters, Anna, Irma, Theresa, Lisa, Margot, and Erika are surprisingly less known, although they had a significant impact on the history of dance. The name “Isadorables,” as Isadora’s daughters came to be called, was coined by the French critic Fernand Divoire in 1909; they played a key role in continuing the Duncan method.
The paper focuses on the activities and characteristics in the period during which they separated from Isadora in 1921. The activities of each of her daughters are discussed in depth, particularly their dance school and performances, on the basis of an examination of unpublished materials, which include photos, brochures, and newspaper and magazine articles from the United States and Europe, as well as interviews.
The present study a) finds the true heirs of Duncan Dance, b) defines each of the Isadorables’ activities and characteristics, and c) clarifies how Isadora’s protégés passed on Duncan Dance.
Owing to the Isadorables’ efforts, Duncan Dance spread all over the world and continues to be pursued even to this day.
Emi Yagishita is a Ph. D. student in the Department of Theatre and Film Arts (Dance Studies) at Waseda University (Tokyo), a Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and a member of the Japanese Society for Dance Research. She is a dancer who performs many dance forms and holds the Certification in Duncan Dance from the Isadora Duncan Dance Foundation in New York City.
Yushkova, Elena (independent scholar, PhD) Perceptions of Isadora Duncan’s art in Russian criticism (Monday, 1330–1530)
American dancer and dance reformer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) became an important part of Russian culture from the moment of her first performance in 1904 in St. Petersburg. Her subsequent Russian tours took place in 1905, 1907-1908, 1909, and 1913. In 1921 she was invited to Soviet Russia by its new Bolshevik government and founded the School of Duncan in Moscow. All her visits were widely covered by the Russian Media. Journals such as Vesy (Scales), Theater and Art, Apollo, Zolotoe Runo (Golden Fleece), Masks, Studio, along with the newspapers Russia, Theater, Stock Exchange Bulletin, Russian Word, and later – Izvestiya, Art’s Life, Ogonyok and others published numerous reviews—some enthusiastic, some critical, and some outright insulting. The coverage of Duncan’s performances varied according to the artistic and social contexts of certain periods of time as well as to the dancer’s ideas and techniques across various periods of her life. If the theater criticism of the Silver Age (1900s) saw in her work an embodiment of the idea of ‘the unspoken’ (the highest and symbolic reality, something beyond expression) and a basis for a new Gesamtkunstwerk, the Soviet newspapers and magazines of the 1920s found in her art ‘the roar of the revolution’s trumpet’ and a possibility to educate new Russian people using a new revolutionary approach to education.
Elena Yushkova, PhD, Russia, scholar of Isadora Duncan, author of the book ‘Plastique of the Overcoming: short notes on the history of Russian plastique theater’ (2009, in Russian), author of more than 20 academic articles on Duncan. Former scholar in residence at the Kennan Institute (Washington, DC, USA). Currently works on a Russian-language monograph on Isadora Duncan.
SDHS publications

Studies in Dance History SDHS’s monograph series, published by University of Wisconsin Press, answers a growing demand for works that provide fresh analytical perspectives on dancing, dancers, and dances in a global context. Read more...

[cover of 2012 Conversations] Issued yearly in early spring generally, Conversations Across the Field of Dance Studies reflects the dynamic and diverse membership of SDHS. We seek to bring you themes and debates current in the field of dance studies and the profession, alongside news from the international community of scholars in dance and related disciplines. Read more...

conferences

Conference 2014: Writing Dancing/Dancing Writing
A Joint Conference of The Society of Dance History Scholars (SDHS) and The Congress on Research in Dance (CORD)
13–16 November 2014
Hosted by the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa

Conference 2015 will be held in Athens, Greece. Dates and other details will be available later this Spring.

news

The SDHS Board of Directors election takes place during the final two weeks of February. All SDHS members may vote. Please log in and then click here to view candidates’ biographies. Ballots will be available beginning on Feb. 15.

SDHS announces the November 2013 awards, including de la Torre Bueno Prize® Special Citations.

Proceedings of the 2013 joint NOFOD/SDHS conference are now available.

Proceedings of the Special Topics Conference 2013: “Sacre Celebration: Revisiting, Reflecting, Revisioning” are now available.

Call for proposals for contributions to Conversations Across the Field of Dance Studies: Network of Pointes (Guest Editors: Drs. Kathrina Farrugia and Jill Nunes Jensen). Note that the deadline has been extended to May 15, 2014.

Updated 3 April: Conference announcements and calls for papers

Updated 3 April: Job postings and opportunities for students

Updated 24 February: News and announcements from SDHS members: “The American Society for Theatre Research is now seeking nominations for the Biennial Sally Banes Publication Prize....”

SDHS endorses MLA statement on learning another language

Connect to Amazon.com through this link and a percentage of your purchase will help fund graduate student travel to SDHS conferences.