Schedule — SDHS 2012 Conference

Dance and the Social City
SDHS 35th Annual Conference

The University of the Arts
Philadelphia, PA
14–17 June, 2012

Below is a preliminary schedule for the 2012 SDHS Conference. The schedule will be updated regularly to reflect changes in times or panel configurations that may become necessary, and as details are added. Please Note Well that this schedule is subject to change!


Schedule Outline

Thursday 3:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
Friday 8:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 2:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m.
Saturday 8:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m. 2:00 p.m. 2:45 p.m. 3:45 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m. 10:00 p.m.
Sunday 9:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m.

Thursday, 14 June, 2012

3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
  • Graduate Students’ Welcome — Terra building, 2nd floor near registration tables  [ details... ]
4:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Opening Reception — Caribou Cafe 12th & Walnut
7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
  • Welcome Historical Ball — Terra Studio 205 Dance Mistress: Karen Millyard  [ details... ]
8:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.

Friday, 15 June, 2012

8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
  • Dancing the Popular — Terra 806 Moderator: Harmony Bench
  • On and Beyond the Self: How Individual Dance Artists are Reimagining the Social City (submitted panel) — Terra 831  [ details... ]
    • Intimacy and Longing: Ballet and Queer Subjectivity in the Work of Deborah Lohse Gretchen Alterowitz
    • Staging a Site for Self-Reflection: Re-inhabiting Meredith Monk’s Education of the Girlchild  Alison Bory
    • Their Hands in the Dirt: How Kazuo Ohno and Stephanie Skura Cultivate Dance Practices from Nature Amanda Hamp
  • Historical Paris — Terra 833 Moderator: Andrea Harris
    • Unpacking Eugène Giraudet’s Library: Dance, Books, and International Relations in fin-de-siècle Paris  Dominique Bourassa
    • Having a Ball in Nineteenth-Century Paris: Re-membering the City through Social Dance Suzanne Braswell
    • De-rat-ifying the Ballet Dancer: Nineteenth-Century Paris and its rats de l’Opéra.  Sarah Davies Cordova
  • Ballrooms, Pageantry, and Representations — Terra 905 Moderator: Lena Hammergren
10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • How to use your body to survive academia, finish your dissertation, and write your first book (workshop) — Terra 205 Moderator: HeJin Jang
  • Black Presences Across Geographies — Terra 704 Moderator: Constance Valis Hill
    • Moonless Night, Perfumed Garden: Black African Presences in the Music and Dance of Medieval Seville Meira Goldberg
    • The Miller Brothers and Lois: Agency, Exploitation, and Spectacle in Philadelphia’s Tap and Flash Act Margaret Morrison
    • Black Drill Team Performance: Dance, Competition, and Socialization Carl Paris
  • Dance and/as Migration (curated panel) — Terra 806 Moderator: Cindy García  [ details... ]
  • Urban Planning, Labor, and Dance Formations — Terra 831 Moderator: Gabriele Klein
    • The Spontaneous City: Urban Planning and Breaking Practice Mary Fogarty
    • Dance, Labor, and the City: Dancers for Life and Post-Crisis Buenos Aires Victoria Fortuna
    • Dancing Across Borders: The Regional Identity of Odissi Dance Nandini Sikand
  • International Archives — Terra 833 Moderator: Susan L. Wiesner
    • Popular dancing in Peru’s late eighteenth century: the dances in the Martínez Compañón Codex Peggy L. Murray
    • Paris Dansant? Improvising across urban, racial and international geographies in the early cancan Clare Parfitt-Brown
    • Dystopic and Miraculous Bodies—Poverty, Disability and the City in Early Ballet  Virginia K. Preston
12:00 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
  • Members’ Award Luncheon — Hamilton Hall 320 S. Broad
2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Distributed Cities — Terra 704 Moderator: Amanda Hamp
    • City dances, dancing city: architecture and space in contemporary Bharatanatyam dance practices Suparna Banerjee
    • Urban Curb: how the city structures dance understanding Michael Bodel
    • Buenos Aires is everywhere - subjectivities and territories in Tango Argentino Melanie Haller
  • Dancing Alterity in The Global City (submitted panel) — Terra 806 Moderator: Victoria Fortuna  [ details... ]
    • Serious Fun at Sun City: (Re)Staging South African Women’s Struggle From Behind Bars Lisa Biggs
    • Utopian Performatives at the Arabic Nightclub: Community, Pleasure, and Affect at the Belly Dance Show Meiver De la Cruz
    • Dancing Against the Law: Critical Moves in Bengaluru’s Gay Nightlife Kareem Khubchandani
    • Dancing in the (Socialist) City: Bangladesh at the 1979 International Folk Festival in Zagreb Munjulika Rahman
  • Philadelphia and the Founding of American Theater Dance (submitted panel) — Terra 831 Moderator: Lynn Matluck Brooks  [ details... ]
  • Trisha Brown and the Roof — Terra 833 Moderator: Megan Nicely
    • High Above the Urban Din: Passed Movement Transmission in Trisha Brown’s Roof Piece (1971) and Christian Jankowski’s Rooftop Routine (2007)  Jennie H. Goldstein
    • Out of Site: Trisha Brown’s Roof Piece Amanda Jane Graham
    • Scarlet Letters on the Roof. Urban Topography and Body-Calligraphy in Trisha Brown’s Roof and Fire Piece  Alexander Schwan
  • This Town Is a Mystery: Citizen Dancers and Potluck Dinners in Philadelphia (submitted panel: roundtable) — Terra 905 Moderator: Sara Wolf  [ details... ]
4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
  • Pagode: A Brazilian Urban Social Movement of Perpetual Momentum (workshop) — Terra 205
  • Destabilizing the Allure of Detroit’s “Ruin Porn”: Choreo-Ethnographic Alternatives (submitted panel) — Terra 806 Moderator: Ariel Osterweis  [ details... ]
    • Walking off-Balance: Ambivalent Peripatetic Practices in Detroit Mary Elizabeth Anderson
    • Moving the Field? The Perils and Possibilities of Performing Feminist Ethnography in Detroit Aimee Meredith Cox
    • Spero Meliora: The Intersection of Dance, Music and Interactive Multi-Media Surrounding the Revitalization of the City of Detroit Jeff Michael Rebudal
  • Urban Selves and Others — Terra 831 Moderator: Lester Tomé
  • Revising Nationalisms I — Terra 833 Moderator: Hannah Kosstrin
    • Ruth Page, Paris, 1950-52: From Ballet Americana to Ballet Cosmopolitan Joellen A. Meglin
    • The Precarious Identity of Korean Modern Dance Higher Education in the 1980s: Feminine Empowerment and Oppression in the Martha Graham Technique Chuyun Oh
    • The Time is Now: American Zionism and Sophie Maslow’s Utopian Choreography for Israel Bonds Rebecca Rossen
  • Streets of London (submitted panel) — Terra 905  [ details... ]
    • Walking/Dancing: an historical (pre)amble Larraine Nicholas
    • Urban Encounters and Collective Intimacy in Rosemary Lee’s Square Dances Katja Nyqvist
    • Encountering the Diaspora: Dancing around and through London’s Heritage Sites Stacey Prickett
6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Screendance — Terra 806 Moderator: Douglas Rosenberg  [ details... ]

Saturday, 16 June, 2012

8:00 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
  • Graduate Student Breakfast — Terra building, 9th floor conference room  [ details... ]
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
  • Flash lecture-demonstration — Terra 205 Moderator: Katherine Mezur
    • Flash: A Case Study in Butoh, Hip-Hop, and Performing the Urban Body in Crisis Michael Sakamoto
  • Passion, Identity, and African Diasporic Revelations: Dancing our Cities, LA and Salvador, Bahia, Buenos Aires, and Havana (submitted panel) — Terra 806 Moderator: Heidi Gilpin  [ details... ]
  • Patronage and Global Cities — Terra 831 Moderator: Virginia Preston
    • Bodies Under the Influence: Anne Bass, Sy Sar, and the Politics of Patronage Alison D’Amato
    • A Different “Special Relationship”: Martha Graham and the British Cultural Luminaries John Gielgud, E. M. Forster, and Henry Moore  Camelia Lenart
    • Mesmerizing Metropolitan Meetings: Harry Graf Kessler’s Interaction with Ruth St. Denis in Berlin around 1900 Wesley Lim
  • Global Ballrooms — Terra 833 Moderator: Sherril Dodds
    • The influence of the establishment of the college ballroom dance clubs in Taipei on the development of Taiwan ballroom dance competition Shing-Chin Jung
    • Interacting Bodies in Sports Dance and Argentinean Tango Susanne Ravn
    • Queer Tango and Heteronormative Hierarchies in Three North American Cities Elizabeth M. Seyler
  • Dance and Urban Renewal I: American Cities — Terra 905 Moderator: Ann Cooper Albright
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Global Travelers — Terra 704 Moderator: Paul Scolieri
    • Stepping into a Spiritual Economy: Medieval Choreomania and the Circulation of Urban Sanctity Kathryn Dickason
    • Dance as a Cross-Cultural Media: Xiao-bang Wu’s life between Tokyo and Shanghai in the 1930s Yukiyo Hoshino
    • Taubert in Danzig Tilden Russell
  • The City as Dance Subject / Dance as City Subject — Terra 806 Moderator: Tresa Randall
    • Dancing through the archives in Reggio Emilia: tracing the heritage of Aterballetto and William Forsythe within the Teatro Romolo Valli Archives  Kathrina Farrugia
    • Choreographing New York’s Rudeness: Exceptional behavior in Yvonne Meier’s objectionable dancing subjects of the early 1990s. Doran George
    • Curbside Attention: Paul-André Fortier’s Solo 30x30 Alana Gerecke
  • Hybridity, Erotics, Race — Terra 831 Moderator: Colleen Dunagan
    • Guillermo Gómez-Peña: Breaking Binaries through Hybrid Performance Casey Avaunt
    • Dancing in the Combat Zone: Striptease, Nostalgia, and Urban Renewal Jessica Berson
    • Heterocorporealities: intertextuality and hybridity in contemporary popular dance Joanna Hall
  • Site-specifi/Cities: Street Movements, Social Critique, and Dance on Film (submitted panel) — Terra 833 Moderator: Ariel Osterweis
    • Under the El: Black Americans, Italian Americans, and the Brooklyn Dancescape of the 1970s and 1980s Sima Belmar
    • Black Street Movement: Turfing, Trauma and Politics of Sitation in Oakland, California Naomi Elizabeth Bragin
    • Flash mobs: critique, commentary, choreography Kate Mattingly
  • Butoh ’Scapes and Urban Corporealities, Part I: Tokyo, New York, Berlin (submitted panel) — Terra 905 Moderator: Megan Nicely  [ details... ]
    • Manufactured with Pride by Carmel Mercantile: Burlesque Dance and Fake Trailers in the Japanese Avant-garde Dance Butô  Bruce Baird
    • Mourning (and) the City: Eiko & Koma’s New York Site Dances Rosemary Candelario
    • A ’hood, a street, a storefront: 9XBerlin+Mumbai+Tokyo = Duration Katherine Mezur
12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
  • Dance and Technology Working Group — Terra 702 Convenor: Susan L. Wiesner
  • Popular, Social, and Vernacular Dance Working Group — Terra 704 Convenor: Clare Parfitt-Brown
  • Interdisciplinary Approaches to Nineteenth Century Dance: Romanticism and other Contexts Working Group — Terra 831 Convenor: Sarah Davies Cordova
  • Dance History Teachers Working Group — Terra 833 Convenor: Katy Boche
  • Early Dance Working Group — Terra 905 Convenor: Ken Pierce
2:00 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Members’ Meeting — Kaplan Hall 17th Floor Moderator: Thomas F. DeFrantz and Ann Cooper Albright
3:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
  • Crossing Boundaries of Individual, Nation, Folk — Terra 704 Moderator: Rebecca Rossen
    • Implicit Avant-Garde: How Did Legend Lin’s Dancers embody the conflict with the “Attitude” of Modern Society Taiyueh Chen
    • Nomadism and Embodied Knowing in Improvised Movement Practices Vida L Midgelow
    • In the Home and on the Street: The Convivial Citizenship of Headlong Dance Theater and Rajni Shah Sara Wolf
  • Dancing Latino New York: 30 Years of Experimentation (submitted panel: roundtable) — Terra 806 Moderator: Ramón H. Rivera-Servera  [ details... ]
  • Dance and Urban Renewal II: Global Cities — Terra 831 Moderator: Clare Parfitt-Brown
    • Experiencing urban cultures, translating gestures: Pina Bausch’s choreographic view on global cities Gabriele Klein
    • The Sleeping Beauty Wakes Up in Philadelphia: Classical Ballet in the American City Laura Katz Rizzo
  • Historicizing Music and Dance — Terra 833 Moderator: Gretchen Alterowitz
    • Antony Tudor’s Dark Elegies and the Affirmation of Mahler’s Body, 1937–1947 Wayne Heisler Jr.
    • Leonide Massine’s Parade Gay Morris
    • Rousseau’s Revolutionary Corps de Ballet Olivia Sabee
  • Butoh ’Scapes and Urban Corporealities, Part II: Time/Space (submitted panel) — Terra 905  [ details... ]
    • Urban Nomads: Buto Communities “Smoothing” the City Space Tanya Calamoneri
    • Hyperdance in Tokyo: Urban Space as Subject in Tanaka Min’s Solo Dance Practice; 1975-1977 Zack Fuller
    • Akira Kasai’s “Voice Power”: Pre-articulations of the Social Body Megan Nicely
5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
  • Choreographic Practices Journal: Meet the Editor — Terra 806  [ details... ]
  • Latin American Latino Dance Working Group — Terra 833 Convenor: Lester Tomé
6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Graduate Student Social Hour — Fadó Irish Pub, 1500 Locust  [ details... ]
8:00 p.m.
  • Philadelphia Dances Performance — Arts Bank Theater
10:00 p.m.
  • Conferee Dance Party (No-Host)

Sunday, 17 June, 2012

9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
  • Revising Nationalisms II — Terra 704 Moderator: Margaret Morrison
  • Queer Masculinities — Terra 806 Moderator: Carl Paris
    • Remembering Better Days: Queening Out, Butching It Up, and Turning It Out on the Dance Floor Mark Broomfield
    • Express Whose Self?: Queer Male Dancing Bodies of Color and the Female Pop Diva in Madonna’s Blond Ambition Tour Amy Guenther
  • Popular Traditions Re/Formed — Terra 831 Moderator: Kathrina Farrugia
    • Hybridized Body of “Tu-Fong-Wu”: Resituate International Folk Dance under the Contemporary Society of Taiwan  Chiao-Hsin Chen
    • Popular Embodiments of English Folk Sherril Dodds
    • Dancing with a Vengeance: Ritualized Sexual Aggression in Social Dance of the Ragtime Era and Beyond Eden Elizabeth Kainer
  • Learning to Dance the City — Terra 833 Moderator: Sarah Skaggs
    • Chinese Dance and Beijing Opera Ensembles at the Folk Arts Cultural Treasures School Ellen Gerdes
    • Building National Character: Urbanization, Americanization and Folk Dance in Chicago, 1890 - 1940 Jessica Ray Herzogenrath
    • Martha Bowers and Dance Theatre Etcetera: Dancing with the Community On the Waterfront in Red Hook, Brooklyn  Colleen Hooper
  • Postmodern and Contemporary Cityscapes — Terra 905 Moderator: Sarah Davies Cordova
    • Bad and Cool: Influence, Assimilation, and Appropriation in the Film West Side Story and Michael Jackson’s Music Video Elizabeth June Bergman
    • Bringing The Country To Town: The Multi-local Landscape in Selected Works by Molissa Fenley and Trisha Brown Ann Murphy
    • Has change in the urban landscape ignited ballet’s evolution? A perspective on the contribution of London’s landscape and social relations to current dance (ballet) practices, specifically Wayne McGregor’s Infra (2008). Samantha Parsons
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Dance, Mass Media, and Citizenry — Terra 806 Moderator: DonnaFaye Burchfield
    • Dance Revolution: New Embodiments and Media-Citizenry Pallabi Chakravorty
    • Tebow and the Touch Down Dance Dawn Springer
    • Framing the Consumption of Movement: Popular Representation of the Dancing Body and the Relationship to the Viewer Alicia Wilson
  • Attack the Block: Rethinking the Urban Dance Spaces of New York, Luanda, and Manila (submitted panel) — Terra 831 Moderator: Katherine Profeta
    • B-Girls: The Anomaly of Breaking Culture Jenny Sky Fung
    • Mimetic Movement in Angola’s Dança Kuduro; Historically Layered Space and Sociality Alexandra Harlig
  • In and Out of Line: Transgressive Steps in Three American Acts (submitted panel) — Terra 833 Moderator: Anusha Kedhar
    • Co-Choreographing Social Relations: Improvised Dance and Police Surveillance at the New Orleans Second Line Rachel Carrico
    • We Fell In Love In a Hopeless Place: In search of the Carnivalesque within the US Pop-Performances of Rihanna Adanna Jones
    • Pious and Porn Spectacles: Frontier Choreographies of LA’s Jewish Femme Hannah Schwadron
  • New Directions in the Historigraphic — Terra 905 Moderator: Joellen Meglin
12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
  • Graduate Students’ Post-Conference Gathering — Terra 833 Moderator: Virginia Preston  [ details... ]

Panels and Panel Moderators

Graduate Students’ Welcome (Thu 3:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.)
Join us for coffee! Meet students and drop off books for the annual raffle. (Terra building, second floor, by registration.)
Welcome Historical Ball (Thu 7:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m.) — moderator: Karen Millyard

An evening of English Country Dancing to live music, all dances taught and cued. We will sample dances from the full range of ECD’s 450-year-old repertoire (including 17th century, 18th century, Regency, late 20th- and early 21st century). The music, from slipjigs to reels, 3/4 and 3/2, presents a wide spectrum of moods and is delightful to dance to. We hope you’ll join us.

Music by: A Joyful Noise (Daniel Beerbohm, Kathy McTavitie, and Barbara Greenberg)

Karen Millyard, an MA student in Dance Studies at York University in Toronto, specializes in late-Georgian social dance. Millyard co-created and co-organized the conference English Country Dancing: Rooted in the Past, Dancing into the Future. A teacher and consultant, she works in museums, heritage sites, schools and the community as well as leading workshops and balls to bring the dances of the past to the general public of today.
Headlong Dance Theater: Avalanche (Thu 8:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m.)
Supported by a Mellon grant, this evening-length quintet created by the Philadelphia-based Headlong Dance Theater is at once playful and deadly serious, addresses the nature of performance training, and explores the intersections of various practices, processes, and rhythms by investigating our individual histories of performance and notions of performativity. The project, featuring five college dance faculty addresses process, performance, and pedagogy at the intersections of dance and theater. (At the Performance Garage, 1515 Brandywine Street. June 14–16, 8pm. Free to conference participants.)
On and Beyond the Self: How Individual Dance Artists are Reimagining the Social City (Fri 8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.)

How do individual choreographers negotiate their own positions in their respective social cities? Attending to the conference theme, this panel examines dance practice and performance as a space for the individual to create and reflect upon various experiences, subjectivities and social spheres. The worlds the choreographers make by means of their practices, dances and reproductions of their own work are the individual artists’ assertions of the world as they envision it to be possible. They seem to be motivated by the idea or hope that an individual creative act can enact something in the larger world, can indeed create—and the choreographers and audience can therefore inhabit—the city, community or world they envision.

This panel engages with dance and life practices of Deborah Lohse, Meredith Monk, Kazuo Ohno and Stephanie Skura, choreographers living and working in different spaces, yet, we suggest, sharing an interest in addressing how the individual exists within and through community. Lohse uses classical ballet as a source, but queers it to reflect upon tensions that exist when multiple identities inhabit a single being; Monk, by repeatedly revisiting a well-known work, creates and re-organizes temporary communities for self-reflection; and Ohno and Skura, both city-based artists, cultivate relationships with so-called natural environments to concentrate on interconnectedness and senses of a vaster “self.” By bringing these individual projects into conversation, we hope to question how these choreographic acts might have impact on and beyond the self, and how these individuals are reimagining the social city.

Dance and/as Migration (Fri 10:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m.) — moderator: Cindy García
This panel turns to dance as a framework for considering the politicized motions of migration. While Karima Robinson specifically addresses the migration of dance practices across geographic and social borders in Jamaica, Ramón Rivera-Servera and Sandra Soto turn to the ways that the crossings of the U.S.-Mexico border affect Latina/o bodies and discourses of latinidad.
Cindy García is an Assistant Professor, dance theorist, performance ethnographer, and playwright in the Department of Theatre Arts and Dance at the University of Minnesota. In 2010 she was awarded a Ford Foundation Research Fellowship to complete her book project entitled Dancing Salsa “Wrong” : Pausing on Latinidad in Los Angeles that addresses the politics of social performances of gendered latinidad, migration, class, and race. The manuscript is being published by Duke University Press.
Dancing Alterity in The Global City (Fri 2:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.) — moderator: Victoria Fortuna
Global cities are repeatedly narrated as heterogeneous spaces of convergence; the papers in this panel describe moments of performance that reveal unexpected, unwelcome, or foreign presences that critique the city’s assumed cosmopolitan character. The institutions discussed here (night clubs, prisons, folk festivals) are apparatuses of display and spectacle, which also contain and restrict “other” bodies. The papers in the panel describe critical performative acts of alterity that not only interrupt hegemonic narratives but also point towards the possibility of affective identification and public intimacy in these urban institutions. “Dancing Against the Law” uses the intersecting illegalities of social dance and homosexuality to situate an ethnographic exploration of gay nightlife in Bengaluru, India. “Dancing in the (Socialist) City” focuses on the Bangladeshi delegation’s 1979 trip to the festival in Zagreb and contends that on a deeper level, the festival served as an avenue for organizers to emplace socialist perceptions of the “folk” into the practices of the participants. “Utopian Performatives at the Arabic Nightclub” uses an ethnographic approach to reconceptualize the role of social dance and of the belly dancer within an Iraqi night club in Chicago to demonstrate that dance performance is central to how political identities and associations are made. The final paper, “Serious Fun at Sun City” argues that the labor of the Sun City inmates’ theatre show, “Serious Fun,” in particular the layering of anti-apartheid and kwaito song and dance, forces a radical reconstruction of contemporary crime discourse, and ultimately, of the Rainbow Nation itself.
Philadelphia and the Founding of American Theater Dance (Fri 2:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.) — moderator: Lynn Matluck Brooks
As the leading American city politically, socially, and economically, seventeenth-century Philadelphia experienced a vibrant theatrical life—once Quaker suspicions were allayed. America’s first home-grown theater professional, dancer John Durang, made his career there, and the first American ballerinas—Mary Ann Lee and Augusta Maywood—trained and performed in eighteenth-century Philadelphia. Both also studied in Paris, but Maywood stayed abroad while “Our Mary Ann” returned home. Early in the twentieth century, dancing masters Albert W. Newman and C. Ellwood Carpenter staged full-length ballets, and Catherine Littlefield—dancer, teacher, and choreographer, who trained under Carpenter—worked for Philadelphia opera companies and created her own ballet company.
This Town Is a Mystery: Citizen Dancers and Potluck Dinners in Philadelphia (Fri 2:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.) — moderator: Sara Wolf

This roundtable convenes the artistic personnel for Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town is a Mystery. Premiering September, 2012, This Town is a Mystery extends Headlong’s ongoing research into “citizen dancers.” In four Philadelphia homes, Headlong will create dance theater pieces with the residents as performers and the home as site. Audience members will travel to a home, one perhaps far from their own culturally and geographically, watch the residents perform, and then share a potluck dinner. Who lives in Philadelphia? What mysteries reside in these homes, these bodies? And what conversations might happen if we open our doors a little?

Since 1993, Headlong Dance Theater, a collaboration of David Brick, Andrew Simonet and Amy Smith, has created dance theater in Philadelphia and toured nationally. Recent projects include CELL, a performance journey for one audience member at a time guided by your cell phone. Headlong also hosts Dance Theater Camp, a free artist-run festival of workshops and collaboration, and the Headlong Performance Institute, an accredited semester program in experimental performance.

Lea Bostick, Adam Bostick, Princess Bostick, and Zahed Aryadarei are performers in Headlong’s upcoming project This Town is a Mystery.

Destabilizing the Allure of Detroit’s “Ruin Porn”: Choreo-Ethnographic Alternatives (Fri 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.) — moderator: Ariel Osterweis
This panel brings together three scholars critically reflecting upon their embodied practices of choreography, walking, and ethnography in contemporary Detroit. In an effort to subvert the way Detroit has come to be aestheticized in the public imaginary as a ghostly necropolis, Anderson, Cox and Rebudal rigorously question the role of the choreographic-ethnographic body in dance research. Most significantly, this panel engages with the post-industrial, neo-liberal, and racialized politics of Detroit’s urban landscape, one that has ejected its most vital inhabitants, on the one hand, and invited haphazard documentarians, on the other. Anderson explores the limits and possibilities of peripatetic ambivalence in her active practice that combines urban walking with performative writing; Cox reflects upon her activist project of feminist youth performance and ethnography; Rebudal presents his work on a multi-media project that choreographically grapples with the goals of urban “revitalization.” Finally, as the fourth member of a panel of scholar-practitioners who live (or have lived) in Detroit, Osterweis serves as respondent.
Streets of London (Fri 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.)
We take our title from Ralph McTell’s early 1970s lyrics exposing the social rejection of individuals endemic in city life. “Let me take you by the hand and lead you through the streets of London, I can show you something to make you change your mind.” Like him we set out on real and imaginary journeys, in and through specific places in London, but we see another side of London, one of energy and agency through dance. From different disciplinary perspectives, the three papers are immersed in the bricks-and-mortar London, which nevertheless reveals and enables historical and contemporary stories of its societies. We look at dance traditions and memory; diasporas, dance practices, participation and spectatorship. Between us, and from varying theoretical standpoints that include historical research, cultural geography, phenomenology, and professional dance practice, we explore dance from past and present in specific London environments where architecture and social life meet. These papers have been conceived from distinct perspectives but within the panel we identify the synergies between our research. The London we investigate is revealed through dance in its open spaces, enclosed places and city transits.
In Conversation: The City’s Landscape of Movement (Fri 6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.) — moderator: Maria Urrutia
This informal conversation brings together artists, scholars, a city planner, and an architect to discuss their experiences and thoughts on the intersections between space, architecture and the moving body. How do they as thinkers and creators cross utilize the city’s landscape to inspire and materialize work? (Beverages and snacks will be provided.)
Cuban Born, Maria Urrutia, is currently an MFA candidate in Interdisciplinary Studies at Goddard College. She has earned both an EdM, Dance Education Masters, from Temple University and a BFA in Modern Dance Education from The University of the Arts. Ms Urrutia has presented original Cuban Dance research in London, Toronto, Montreal and Edinburgh. Additionally her teaching of Cuban Rumba in Diaspora took her to Tokyo, Japan and Santiago, Chile. As a performing artist and choreographer she has worked with Cardell Dance Theater, and shown her work independently as part of curated shows in Philadelphia and Vermont. www.mariaurrutia.com
Screendance (Fri 6:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.) — moderator: Douglas Rosenberg
Douglas Rosenberg is a founding editor of the International Journal of Screendance, an EMMY nominated director and the recipient of the prestigious Phelan Art Award in Video. He was awarded the Director’s Prize at the International Jewish Video Festival for his film, My Grandfather Dances with choreographer Anna Halprin and received an IZZIE Award for his work on the intermedia project, “Singing Myself A Lullaby”, (a collaboration with Ellen Bromberg and John Henry). His book, Screendance: Inscribing the Ephemeral Image, (2012) is published by Oxford University Press. He is a professor of art at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Graduate Student Breakfast (Sat 8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m.)
All are welcome at this student-faculty conversation about the state of the field: new scholarship, publishing and arts practice. This year, we will be joined by a group of faculty members that includes Thomas DeFrantz and Sherril Dodds. (Terra building, 9th floor conference room.)
Passion, Identity, and African Diasporic Revelations: Dancing our Cities, LA and Salvador, Bahia, Buenos Aires, and Havana (Sat 9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.) — moderator: Heidi Gilpin
Heidi Gilpin is Chair of European Studies and Associate Professor in the Department of German at Amherst College, where she teaches performance studies, electronic arts, architectural studies, cultural theory, and multidisciplinary studies. Until 2000, she was an Associate Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies at the University of Hong Kong, and since 1991 was on the graduate faculty at the University of California at Riverside. She holds a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Harvard University. From 1989–1996 she worked in Frankfurt, Germany as the dramaturg (conceptual author) for choreographer William Forsythe and the Ballett Frankfurt, where they developed strategies of movement research involving architectural principles and interactive technologies. She was the founding director of the Institute for New Dramaturgy, organizing and teaching multidisciplinary workshops and colloquia on issues of composition for the performing arts and architecture in Eastern and Western Europe. At the University of California at Riverside, Gilpin was instrumental in establishing the first international multidisciplinary Ph.D. program in Dance History and Theory. She has lectured and published internationally on contemporary European performance genres, with a focus on the interdisciplinary terrain created by scholars and artists working in the areas of technology, architecture, performance, trauma, and critical theory. For the opening of the ZKM Center for Art and Media Technology in Karlsruhe, Germany in 1997, Gilpin was invited to create an interactive performance/web piece entitled “My Space - Your Place.” Gilpin is currently completing a book, Architectures of Disappearance, which addresses issues of movement, composition, corporeal perception, and trauma in performance, new media, and architectural work. She is also editing a collection of essays entitled The Senses in Motion. Both books are forthcoming from the MIT Press.
Butoh ’Scapes and Urban Corporealities, Part I: Tokyo, New York, Berlin (Sat 11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.) — moderator: Megan Nicely

This panel examines the interactions between artists and their adopted cities in performances that span butoh’s history of urban migration.

Butoh, a rebellious, erotic, and disturbing body art emerged in a 1960s Tokyo cityscape of widespread demonstrations against the Japanese government’s alliance with the US and deep resentment against the modern capitalist economy and its ideals. Tokyo, the messy urban place of disruption, repression, and dark empty spaces, gave early butoh artists such as Hijikata Tatsumi, Akira Kasai, Nakajima Natsu, Furukawa Anzu, and others, an ideal milieu of political pressure, creative license, economic duress, and sensual stimulation. As the 1960s came to a close, Hijikata and others began to look to suburban and rural spaces for inspiration and artistic sustenance. The place/spaces, the bodies, and the living conditions of these pioneering artists and subsequent generations of new millenium and diasporic butoh dancers have informed, driven, stifled, and imploded the visual/kinetic acts of their performances. Throughout butoh’s fifty-year history there has been a deep inside-out and outside-in dialogue between the city cultures and the corporeal cultures of the butoh artists. In this two-part panel, we investigate and question how different bodies and different practices interact, rupture, excite, or censor deeply political, urban corporealities.

Dancing Latino New York: 30 Years of Experimentation (Sat 3:45 p.m.–5:15 p.m.) — moderator: Ramón H. Rivera-Servera
This presentation draws from multi-sited ethnographic data in Texas, New York, and Arizona to explore how Latina/o queer dance club patrons negotiated the intensification of anti-immigrant sentiment and policy in the United States between the late 1990s and early 2000s. This vilification of Latina/o migration occurred at the same time that a national Latina/o niche market was consolidated and narratives of Latina/o ascendancy into the majority minority demographic slot and the middle class circulated. This paper turns to how the micro-choreographies of the Latina/o queer dance club produced and sustained Latina/o interethnic affinities and intimacies or latinidad during this period. Ultimately, this presentation argues for the critical labor of dance as a practice where alternative embodiments and communitarian configurations were rehearsed in between the anti-immigrant and mainstreaming figurations of latinidad.
Butoh ’Scapes and Urban Corporealities, Part II: Time/Space (Sat 3:45 p.m.–5:15 p.m.)

This panel considers how artists associated with butoh transform the idea and experience of the “urban” such that generative relationships between the body, space, and dance are formed.

Butoh, a rebellious, erotic, and disturbing body art emerged in a 1960s Tokyo cityscape of widespread demonstrations against the Japanese government’s alliance with the US and deep resentment against the modern capitalist economy and its ideals. Tokyo, the messy urban place of disruption, repression, and dark empty spaces, gave early butoh artists such as Hijikata Tatsumi, Akira Kasai, Nakajima Natsu, Furukawa Anzu, and others, an ideal milieu of political pressure, creative license, economic duress, and sensual stimulation. As the 1960s came to a close, Hijikata and others began to look to suburban and rural spaces for inspiration and artistic sustenance. The place/spaces, the bodies, and the living conditions of these pioneering artists and subsequent generations of new millenium and diasporic butoh dancers have informed, driven, stifled, and imploded the visual/kinetic acts of their performances. Throughout butoh’s fifty-year history there has been a deep inside-out and outside-in dialogue between the city cultures and the corporeal cultures of the butoh artists. In this two-part panel, we investigate and question how different bodies and different practices interact, rupture, excite, or censor deeply political, urban corporealities.

Choreographic Practices Journal: Meet the Editor (Sat 5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.)

This in an informal drop in session in which you are invited to meet with Journal Editor, Prof Vida L Midgelow, to find out more about the Choreographic Practices Journal (launched in 2010) and to individually discuss possible submissions.

Choreographic Practices provides a space for disseminating choreographic practices, critical inquiry and debate. Serving the needs of students, teachers, academics and practitioners in dance the journal operates from the principle that dance embodies ideas and can be productively enlivened when considered as a mode of critical and creative discourse. Placing an emphasis on processes and practices this journal seeks to engender dynamic relationships between theory and practice, choreographer and scholar, such that these distinctions may be shifted and traversed.

See: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-journal,id=170/

Artist/academic Vida L. Midgelow is Professor in Dance and Choreographic Practices (University of Northampton). Her research led movement works have been presented internationally. She has published in various journals and books, including the monograph Reworking the ballet, in 2007. Her practice focuses upon somatic approaches to improvisation in movement and video installations. Recent works include: Threshold : Fleshfold, TRACE: playing with/out memory and currently the accumulative work: A Date with (my improvisation) Practice can be viewed at: http://danceimprovisationpractice.blogspot.com. She is also editor of the innovative peer reviewed journal Choreographic Practices and Chair of the Standing conference on Dance in Higher Education.
Graduate Student Social Hour (Sat 6:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.)
Informal gathering at Fadó Irish Pub! (1500 Locust, one block from Terra.)
Graduate Students’ Post-Conference Gathering (Sun 12:30 p.m.–1:30 p.m.) — moderator: Virginia Preston
Like to get involved in SDHS? Are you planning to submit a conference paper next year? Want to know how to apply for an essay award? Please join us for the working group.

Alphabetical Listing of Conference Presenters, with Abstracts and Biographies

Abstracts and biographies for all conference presenters are shown below, in order of presenters’ last names. Individual presenters hold the copyrights to their abstracts and bios.

Jump to presenter: Albright Alterowitz Anderson Avaunt Aviles Baird Banerjee Belmar Bergman Berson Biggs Bodel Boggia Bory Bourassa Bragin Braswell Brooks Broomfield Buss Calamoneri Candelario Cardell Carrico Caruso Haviland Chakravorty Chen Chen Coulter Cox D’Amato Davies Cordova De la Cruz Dickason Dilley Dixon Gottschild Dodds Dunagan Elkins Escobar Farrugia Fogarty Fortuna Fuller Fung Gabriels George Gerdes Gerecke Goldberg Goldstein Graham Griffiths Griffiths Guenther Hall Haller Hamp Harlig Harris Heisler Herzogenrath Hooper Hoshino Jackson Jones Jung Kainer Kappenberg Kattner Katz Rizzo Khubchandani Klein Kloppenberg Kloppenberg Lenart Lim Luján Malinsky Mattingly Mazzocca McPherson Meglin Meninato Mercer Merritt Mezur Midgelow Mills Millyard Minarti Morris Morrison Murphy Murray Nicely Nicholas Nyqvist O'Maley Oh Parfitt-Brown Paris Parsons Powell Preston Prickett Rahman Ravn Rebudal Reidy Rivera-Servera Robinson Rossen Russell Sabee Sakamoto Schwadron Schwan Scolieri Seyler Sikand Simonet Simonson Simpson Skeel Smith Soto Springer Suárez Todd Tomé Vasinarom Vazquez Westwater Wilson Wolf Yang

Albright, Ann Cooper (Oberlin College; Chair SDHS Editorial Board)
In this experiential workshop, Ann will share her strategies for engaging the potential of embodied knowledge in the production of academic writing. Unfortunately, many scholars in the dance field divorce themselves from their bodily experience in order to get down to the business of serious scholarship. This move effectively separates the body from the mind in practice, while at the same time often trying to bridge that gap in theory. The results can be intellectually frustrating and physically painful. Through a series of improvisations, the workshop will focus on movement as a source for writing and language as a support for dancing, generating an approach to scholarship that challenges the conventional boundaries between languages of the body and languages of the mind.
A performer, choreographer and feminist scholar, Ann Cooper Albright is Professor of Dance at Oberlin College. Combining her interests in dancing and cultural theory, she is involved in teaching a variety of dance, performance studies and gender studies courses that seek to engage students in both practices and theories of the body. She is the author of Modern Gestures: Abraham Walkowitz Draws Isadora Duncan Dancing (2010); Traces of Light: Absence and Presence in the Work of Loie Fuller (2007); Choreographing Difference: the Body and Identity in Contemporary Dance (1997) and co-editor of Moving History/Dancing Cultures(2001) and Taken By Surprise: Improvisation in Dance and Mind (2003). Encounters with Contact Improvisation (2010) is one of her latest adventures in writing and dancing and dancing and writing – with others! Ann is currently working on an interdisciplinary project entitled Gravity Matters: Finding Ground in an Unstable World, which looks at contemporary embodiment after 9/11.
Alterowitz, Gretchen (UNC Charlotte)
Intimacy and Longing: Ballet and Queer Subjectivity in the Work of Deborah Lohse (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
This presentation examines two works by Deborah Lohse, Ineffable, a ballet from 2011, and Daughter, a dance film from 2010. These choreographies provide entrée into Lohse’s two “cities,” the queer community and the ballet world. They show several possible relationships between the dancers, but do more than demonstrate a way of life; through her choreography and film, Lohse negotiates queer subjectivity and creates space for the audience to do the same. In this paper, I explore how Lohse situates intimacy between women as a site of relevant, contemporary social exchange.
Gretchen Alterowitz is Assistant Professor of Dance at UNC Charlotte. Her research combines choreographic and scholarly approaches to address, broadly, ballet's evolution into a contemporary form. More specifically she focuses on female ballet choreographers and their dialogues with gender on and off the ballet stage. Her choreography has recently been presented by the 11th Annual Women on the Way Festival, in San Francisco; the Emerging Choreographers Showcase in Monterrey; and the North Carolina Dance Festival.
Anderson, Mary Elizabeth (Wayne State University)
Walking off-Balance: Ambivalent Peripatetic Practices in Detroit (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
The traumatic circumstances in which Detroit’s ruinscapes have been rendered inflect and inform the particular types of intimacy that characterize encounters with these sites. This presentation will offer a narrative account of aestheticized walks taken in the city over a period of several years.  Using performative writing as a way to respond to the inherent failure in reading, accounting for, and articulating the experience of ruins in Detroit in both writing and performance, I will examine the extent to which an “ambivalent” mode of walking, writing and thinking in the city might contribute to an enriched account of experience and reception.
Mary Elizabeth Anderson, Assistant Professor in the Maggie Allesee Department of Theatre & Dance, engages questions about the human relationship to place. Essays on performer training have appeared in: About Performance; African Theatre; Australasian Drama Studies; Brolga; and Journal of Dance Education. Recent articles on the work of the teaching artist have appeared in Arts Education Policy Review and Teaching Artist Journal. Mary is currently at work on a manuscript about site-specific performances in Australia.
Avaunt, Casey (Taipei National University of the Arts)
Guillermo Gómez-Peña: Breaking Binaries through Hybrid Performance (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
Guillermo Gómez-Peña is as writer, theorist and performance artist. He creates performances from a variety of cultural sources to suggest that hybridity is experimental and radical. His work investigates cross-cultural issues, the politics of language, and new technologies in the era of globalization. I will argue that Gómez-Peña’s self-reflexive performance methodologies set out to interrogate existing cultural binaries and create new, fluid, and interchangeable meanings. This presentation will provide an exploration into the way that Gómez-Peña’s artwork challenges traditional concepts of race and culture and seeks to find innovative spaces between the cracks of cultural boundaries.
Casey Avaunt is an American dancer, choreographer and dance researcher. She graduated from Colorado College in 2005 with a B.A. in Drama/Dance. The same year, Casey received funding from the Chin-Lin Foundation for Culture and Arts to research meditation, dance and philosophy in Taiwan. For the past five years she has been collaborating and touring internationally with Taiwanese 8213 Physical Dance Theater while receiving her M.F.A. in choreography from Taipei National University of the Arts.
Aviles, Arthur (Dancer/Choreographer - Artistic Director Arthur Aviles Typical Theatre)
Baird, Bruce (University of Massachusetts Amherst)
Manufactured with Pride by Carmel Mercantile: Burlesque Dance and Fake Trailers in the Japanese Avant-garde Dance Butô (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
The dance form butô contains within itself a fracture between practitioners who favor minutely choreographed dance and those who favor improvization (often performed in nature). This presentation will examine the initial dances of the founder of butô, Hijikata Tatsumi, to explore the urban origins of butô and will argue that the improvizations within nature are the exception to the rule that demonstrates butô’s urban origins and orientation.
Bruce Baird teaches Japanese Studies (theater, cinema, philosophy, manga and anime) at UMass Amherst.  He has publilshed several articles and book chapters on butô and more recently published a book on butô entitled Hijikata Tatsumi and Butoh: Dancing in a Pool of Gray Grits (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).
Banerjee, Suparna (University of Roehampton, London)
City dances, dancing city: architecture and space in contemporary Bharatanatyam dance practices (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
Bharatanatyam, an Indian classical dance, has a deep-rooted connection to temple architecture; and thus setting this dance tradition against the post-modern cities is not as uninformed as it might appear. Current practices of the contemporary choreographers in placing bodies in atypical performance spaces and embracing digital technologies contest the conventional use of dance space. Drawing on contemporary choreographies, I will argue that these choreographers have not only consumed and appropriated archi­tectural space in novel ways but also expanded the boundaries of practices. This paper will be informed by the relevant theoretical frameworks and supported by film excerpts of the choreographies.
Suparna Banerjee was awarded an MA in Performing Arts, University of Pune, India. She is trained in Bharatanatyam dance and her current research interests include South Asian dance, transnationalism, dance ethnography and pedagogy. She is an Associate of Higher Education Academy, UK and has received several awards for her performances and teaching. She publishes research articles in peer-reviewed journals and is currently pursuing her PhD at the University of Roehampton, London.
Belmar, Sima (UC Berkeley)
Under the El: Black Americans, Italian Americans, and the Brooklyn Dancescape of the 1970s and 1980s (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
In this paper, I revisit the 1977 film Saturday Night Fever to consider the role dancing plays in the construction of Italian American identities. I argue that Brooklyn sidewalks become sites of embodied identity formation that depend on transitional movements between the private home and the public sphere. Additionally, these transitional spaces are walked and danced through as a form of wider community control, spaces where movement marked as black is allowed to enter only in the form of the white male body. Whereas many formula dance films mobilize dancing as a potential road to multicultural harmony, or at least interracial contact, this film suggests an unbridgeable gap between black and white dancing bodies.
Sima Belmar is a PhD candidate in performance studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Her dissertation theorizes concert dance choreography and performance as a spaces of erasure of the labor of dancing body.
Bergman, Elizabeth June (University of Iowa)
Bad and Cool: Influence, Assimilation, and Appropriation in the Film West Side Story and Michael Jackson’s Music Video (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
Michael Jackson’s music video Bad (1987) stylistically re-contextualized themes of New York City’s urban, multicultural landscape first choreographed for the camera for Cool in West Side Story by Jerome Robbins (1961). I posit the filmed choreography of both works elides the creators’ cultural appropriations and calls attention away from their use of popular entertainment conventions. By glamorizing the “requisite toughness” of marginalized urban youths and the gritty, oppressive city spaces these characters inhabit, both dances defined gang identity in the popular imagination for generations while glossing over the tangled roots of race, class, and culture from which these stereotypes emerged.
Elizabeth June Bergman is a dance artist, educator, and aspiring scholar based out of Iowa City, Iowa. She holds a MFA from the University of Iowa and a BA from DeSales University, Pennsylvania. She has taught movement workshops and has had choreographic and improvisatory work produced across Iowa, in Minneapolis, Omaha, New York City, Lawrence, Kansas, and San Antonio, Texas. She currently teaches as an adjunct in the dance department at the University of Iowa.
Berson, Jessica
Dancing in the Combat Zone: Striptease, Nostalgia, and Urban Renewal (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
From 1974-1990, the City of Boston chose to contain the sex industry within two downtown bocks known as The Combat Zone. Although the Zone was razed to make way for luxury condominiums, Bostonians retain the memory of the erotic possibilities it extended to performers and customers alike. Dance played a key role in generating those possibilities, constructing a kinesthetic and emotional topography that shaped perceptions of the city itself. Focusing on the ways in which these dancers interwove spectacle, glamour, and urban mythology, I interrogate how their dancing helped create a vision of the city that is gone, but not forgotten.
Jessica Berson teaches Dance Studies in and around New England, most recently at Yale, Harvard and Brown. She holds a PhD in Theater and Drama from the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she studied with Sally Banes, and is a Certified Laban Movement Analyst. Her book project, The Naked Result: How Exotic Dance Became Big Business, focuses on the corporate takeover of contemporary striptease dance, and is forthcoming from Oxford University Press.
Biggs, Lisa (Northwestern University)
Serious Fun at Sun City: (Re)Staging South African Women’s Struggle From Behind Bars (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
Since 2008 a select group of women prisoners from Sun City, the central prison in Johannesburg, has been allowed to challenge these presumptions using theatre and dance performances to enter the public sphere as authorities on crime. Drawing on ethnographic and historiographic materials, my paper argues the labor of the Sun City inmates’ show, “Serious Fun”—in particular the layering of anti-apartheid and kwaito song and dance born in the townships with the women’s personal stories of wrong-doing—forces a radical reconstruction of contemporary crime discourse, and ultimately, of the Rainbow Nation itself.
Lisa Biggs is a PhD candidate in Northwestern's Performance Studies Department. Her research investigates the impact of theatre and dance programs for incarcerated women in the United States and South Africa. A native Chicago, Lisa is also a playwright and performing artist. She is a former member of the Living Stage Theatre Company and a current Fellow at the Ellen S. Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media.
Bodel, Michael
Urban Curb: how the city structures dance understanding (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
Nothing has altered how we perceive the world as cataclysmically as the post-industrial, technocratic city. Contemporary concert dance has made its home in these meccas of mass clustering, transience and intersecting trajectories. I propose that our reading of choreography has evolved as a result of the perceptual demands of the urban life-world. Enlisting the help of embodied reason, I question how urban living has restricted the dances we create and the meanings we make. Finally, I look toward alternative schemata for how dance might resonate in different forms of community, be they cave clans or online mega-communities.
Michael Bodel is a choreographer and dance theorist whose current interests include, alphabetically: archiving, Carnival, dance film, immigration, reincarnation, scents, semiotics and tourism. His current project is Dance and Other Archives, a series of subjective documentary dances, essays and objects. Michael holds a B.A. in Dance and Astronomy from Wesleyan University, and an MFA from Hollins University/ADF. He has been trying to download a Ph.D. from the internet, but it seems to be taking too long. 
Boggia, Rachel (Bates College)
Headlong Dance Theater: Avalanche (Thursday, 8:00 p.m.)
Rachel Boggia teaches in the department of Theater and Dance at Bates College. Her research focuses on creating performance (often mediated), dance-science collaboration, and documenting the creative process. She holds an MFA in dance from The Ohio State University and has served on the faculty of Wesleyan University, Dickinson College, Connecticut College, and The Ohio State University.
Bory, Alison (Davidson College)
Staging a Site for Self-Reflection: Re-inhabiting Meredith Monk’s Education of the Girlchild (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
In this paper, I explore the ways in which Meredith Monk’s nearly forty year (1972-2011) revisiting of the solo from Education of the Girlchild has created a theatrical site of social exchange, providing a space for negotiating selfhood within the social city. Situating the work as an autobiographical practice, in which subjectivity is continually re-examined and re-imagined, I argue that its performance has become a choreographic space for self-reflection for Monk and her audience. As a work that she has returned to over time, the composition has created and re-organized shared, temporary communities within—and across—which shifting subjectivities and evolving relationships can be contemplated.
Alison Bory is an Assistant Professor of Dance at Davidson College. Both her choreographic and academic research investigate the possibilities and complexities of contemporary autobiographical (post)modern dance performance forms. She holds an MA from the University of Surrey, and an MFA and PhD from the University of California, Riverside.
Bourassa, Dominique (Yale University Library)
Unpacking Eugène Giraudet’s Library: Dance, Books, and International Relations in fin-de-siècle Paris (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
Eugène Giraudet (1861-19?) was an exceptionally prolific and influential Parisian dance teacher, choreographer, author, and bibliophile. His library catalog, published in his 1900 Traité de la danse, tome II, Grammaire de la danse et du bon ton, is more than a simple record of the books he owned. It also serves as a wish list and a directory of prominent dance personalities. As a whole, it presents an unparalleled conspectus of dance teaching, book collecting, business, and international networks radiating from a major metropolis--the historical urban center of the dance world--in the late-nineteenth century.
Dominique Bourassa, Catalog Librarian for French Language at Yale University, holds master’s degrees in musicology from Université Laval in Québec and in library science from Southern Connecticut State University. She has published articles on dance and military music in Quebec, has reviewed for Notes: The Journal of the Music Library Association, and is the author, with Tilden Russell, of The Menuet de la Cour (Olms Verlag, 2007).
Bragin, Naomi Elizabeth (University of California at Berkeley)
Black Street Movement: Turfing, Trauma and Politics of Sitation in Oakland, California (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
Turfing is an improvisation-based dance rising from street culture of black Oakland youth. YAKFilms’ YouTube-broadcast R.I.P. Project captures turfing at street-side sites of death in the community. They critique Oakland’s history of policing, violence, and trauma, publicizing people whose daily reality constitutes these sites. Turfing creates breaks in institutionalized space, playing with sitation—collective kinesthetic processes of linkage that take space as an arena of struggle and difference, addressing those passed from tell-able history. Within the contemporary moment of politicized occupations in a transnational collective imaginary, the R.I.P. Project invigorates debates linking direct action protest, social media, movement aesthetics, collectivity and violence.
Naomi Elizabeth Bragin (PhD student, Performance Studies, UC Berkeley) researches black street dance and political aesthetics. Her dissertation investigates waacking/punkin’, styles of 1970s Los Angeles’ gay black and Latino communities. Naomi draws from twenty years dance experience, rooted in underground clubs of Los Angeles and New York. As Director of Oakland-based DREAM Dance Company, she was an Isadora Duncan Best Choreography nominee, receiving support from Ford Foundation, Creative Work Fund, Zellerbach Foundation and California Arts Council.
Braswell, Suzanne (University of Miami)
Having a Ball in Nineteenth-Century Paris: Re-membering the City through Social Dance (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
Long associated with images of dance, nineteenth-century Paris also ranks among the great urban centers that gives rise to an emerging and utterly modern consciousness. The institution of the ball, whether in the public domain or in private residences, is pervasive during this time. Drawing on a variety of texts, including social-dance manuals, consumer catalogues, Guy de Maupassant’s short story “Menuet” (“Minuet”) and Emile Zola’s novels L’Assommoir (The Slaughter House) and Nana, this paper explores a profound ambivalence toward modernity and the modern city that social dance both enacts and makes visible in the text of Second Empire Paris.
A specialist in nineteenth- and early-twentieth century French poetics and poetry, Suzanne Braswell's work concentrates particularly on the confluence of French literature, the arts (dance, theatre and painting), and "high" and "low" culture. Her articles have appeared in French Forum, Australian Journal of French Studies, Flaubert. Revue critique et génétique and Dix-Neuf. She is a professor of French at the University of Miami where she is completing a book-manuscript on nineteenth- and early twentieth-century French literature and dance.
Brooks, Lynn Matluck (Franklin & Marshall College)
John Durang: The Engaged Philadelphia Thespian (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
As the United States formed its national identity, American performers wove their work and lives into the new nation. Dancer John Durang, the first American-born stage professional, centered his wide-ranging career in Philadelphia. He wove himself into civic life in a number of ways: representing the Philadelphia printers’ trade in the Federal Procession of 1788 that celebrated the ratification of the United States Constitution; owning and developing land in early Philadelphia; establishing America’s first “dynasty” of American-born theater practitioners; and forming a traveling theatrical troupe, comprised primarily of his own family, that toured the hinterlands of Pennsylvania and Maryland
Lynn Matluck Brooks founded the Dance Program at Franklin & Marshall College in 1984. She holds degrees from University of Wisconsin and Temple University. A Certified Movement Analyst and dance historian, she has held grants from the Fulbright/Hayes Commission, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Brooks wrote reviews for Dance Magazine, edited Dance Research Journal and Dance Chronicle, and is author of several books and many articles.
Broomfield, Mark (The University of Texas at Austin)
Remembering Better Days: Queening Out, Butching It Up, and Turning It Out on the Dance Floor (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
Examining Ronald K. Brown’s Better Days (1998), this paper invokes José Muñoz’s concept of ephemera and David Gere’s notion of “silent speaking” to explore how the New York City dance club Better Days acts as a site for remembering histories of the queer male dancing body. For my analysis, I concentrate on Brown’s choreography that resists conventional representations of the black male dancing body and how the dance summons a “queer communal ethos.” I also examine Brown’s staging the duality of masculinity and femininity that reveals the intangibility of gender performance, as well as the power of gestures and their afterlife.
Mark Broomfield, (Ph.D. in Critical Dance Studies, University of California, Riverside, MFA in Dance, University of Michigan), is a postdoctoral fellow in the African and African Diaspora Studies Department at the University of Texas at Austin. He is currently working on his book manuscript “Passing for Almost Straight: The Politics and Performance of Black Masculinity On- and Offstage.” He is also producing and directing the forthcoming documentary feature on professional black male dancers “Passing for Almost Straight.”
Buss, Andrew (Office of Innovation and Technology, Philadelphia)
Andrew Buss is the Director of Public Programs for the Office of Innovation and Technology in Philadelphia. He directs a large scale implementation of technology-enabled community centers in Philadelphia and is also a founder of the OpenAccessPhilly Movement. Andrew earned a Masters’ Degree in Geography from Temple University, continues to teach there as an adjunct professor, and publishes papers about interdisciplinary teaching and civic collaboration.
Calamoneri, Tanya (Temple University)
Urban Nomads: Buto Communities “Smoothing” the City Space (Saturday, 3:45 p.m.)
Hijikata established an art form that thrives on conflict and opposition to its surroundings, thus feeding off of the urban environment to contradict it and create a new perspective. His strategic positioning influenced the migration and development of buto as “counter-cultures” around the world. Using Deleuze’s idea of striated to frame State imposed urban structures and smooth to understand nomadic resistance, I look at the mixing and morphing of these two forces and the practice of buto in urban spaces in the U.S., particularly New York and San Francisco.
Tanya Calamoneri is a PhD candidate and Presidential Fellow at Temple University, currently completing her dissertation on an analysis of Hijikata's buto training methodology. Calamoneri has published several reviews of buto-related material in Dance Chronicle, and received the Edrie Ferdun Emerging Scholar award at Temple University. She is artistic director of the award-winning Company SoGoNo, and has received funding for her work from NYSCA, NYFA, American Music Center, and Puffin Foundation. sogono.org
Candelario, Rosemary (University of California, Los Angeles)
Mourning (and) the City: Eiko & Koma’s New York Site Dances (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
I examine Eiko & Koma’s New York site dances as a way to explore their long-term relationship with their adopted city and their attempts to create space for themselves as Japanese immigrants and Asian Americans. In order to understand how the duo initiates and sustains relationships between their dancing bodies and public places in New York, and to what ends, I employ choreographic analysis. By focusing on dances from across Eiko & Koma’s repertoire, I am able to discern the choreographers’ changing ideas about the interactions of bodies and places in general, and their connection to New York in particular.
Rosemary Candelario earned a PhD in Culture and Performance from UCLA in 2011. Research interests include the globalization of the Japanese avant-garde movement form butoh, Asian American dance, site-specific performance, arts activism, and space and place. Rosemary published “A Manifesto for Moving: Eiko & Koma’s Delicious Movement Workshops” in the Journal of Theatre, Dance and Performance Training in 2010. She has recently joined the dance faculty at Texas Woman's University as Assistant Professor.
Cardell, Silvana (Artist)
Silvana Cardell is an award winning Argentinean choreographer and dancer living and working in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania since 2002. Cardell holds a BFA in dance from University of the Arts and a MFA in choreography from Temple University. Her work has been sponsored, and commissioned by many International theaters and festivals. Her repertory has been performed in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Poland and Bulgaria. Since 2009 she is the director of the Dance Department at Georgian Court University.
Carrico, Rachel (University of California, Riverside)
Co-Choreographing Social Relations: Improvised Dance and Police Surveillance at the New Orleans Second Line (Sunday, 11:00 a.m.)
This essay looks at the New Orleans second line parade. I argue that police escorts and parading dancers, or second liners, generate competing systems to govern bodily movement at the parades. Police escorts spatially and temporally constrain second lining by circumscribing performance space and enforcing permitted time limits. Dancers occasionally escape police-enforced constraints on mobility through two performance tactics: scaling city structures and pausing the parade’s forward movement. Dancers challenge policing forces and create their own ways of governing how where, and when bodies move. In the second line, policing practices and dancing tactics co-choreograph urban social relations.
Rachel Carrico is a Ph.D. student in Critical Dance Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Her various research interests include street festivals and processional practices, especially in New Orleans where she parades with the Camel Toe Lady Steppers each Mardi Gras. Rachel holds a M.A. in Performance Studies from NYU and her writing on theatre and performance has been published The Drama Review and Extensions: The Online Journal of Embodiment and Technology.
Caruso Haviland, Linda (Bryn Mawr College)
“Good looks, good health and a knowledge of dancing”: Training the stage dancer in Philadelphia in the early 1900s. (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
Although Philadelphia was home to early models of professional instruction, the first decade of the 20th century saw significant growth in dance training for aspiring professional dancers. Among Philadelphia instructors, two emerge more frequently with reference to theatrical dance—Albert W. Newman and C. Ellwood Carpenter. Through their schools and their focused training for the opera companies, they moved the city towards the establishment of professionally geared institutions for classical dance instruction. Despite differences in training, pedagogy and careers, both contributed to the development of an “all American” ballet and to securing dance as an integral part of “artistic” stage productions.
Linda Caruso-Haviland is an Associate Professor and Director of Dance at Bryn Mawr College. She performed both in New York and Philadelphia, principally with ZeroMoving Company directed by Hellmut Gottschild. Her scholarly research has included preserving the work of significant Philadelphia dance artists through oral and video documentation and her present writing focuses on professional dance in early 20th century Philadelphia and on the role of bodiedness in both historiography and the archive.
Chakravorty, Pallabi (Swarthmore College)
Dance Revolution: New Embodiments and Media-Citizenry (Sunday, 11:00 a.m.)
This paper explores the new dance forms on television dance reality shows that are reshaping the urban Indian mediascape. Based on ethnographic research in Kolkata and Mumbai, the paper analyzes the content of these dance genres (ranging from hiphop and jazz to bollywood and classical Indian) on local, vernacular, and national media. I explore how a new generation of dancers, mostly from the working classes, are claiming their identities as choreographers and entrepreneurs. Not only are they reinventing new embodiments of Indian masculinity and femininity through a remix of styles, but by appearing on television they are claiming visibility and a kind of media-citizenry.
Pallabi Chakravorty is Associate Professor in the Department of Music and Dance at Swarthmore College, USA. An anthropologist and dancer by training, she is the author/editor of four books and proceedings and several journal articles and book chapters, most notably “Bells of Change: Kathak Dance, Women, and Modernity in India”. Her current research focuses on Indian dance and media, especially dance reality shows and the Bollywoodization of Indian culture. Pallabi is the founder of Courtyard Dancers (courtyarddancers.org), a nonprofit based in Philadelphia.
Chen, Chiao-Hsin
Hybridized Body of “Tu-Fong-Wu”: Resituate International Folk Dance under the Contemporary Society of Taiwan (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
Being a term translated into Chinese from the meaning of “folk dance” in English, Tu-Fong-Wu has different contents with the change of eras, which reflects it as a hybridized body highly connected with Taiwanese socio-cultural currents, and reveals the need to inspect it further. By observing specific public activities raised by related organizations and groups after 1990, the research will point out Tu-Fong-Wu’s contemporary situation in Taiwanese society, and will also discuss some questions about authenticity and authority during the process of the promotion of Tu-Fong-Wu, and the complicated relationship between folk dance, International folk dance and Tu-Fong-Wu in Taiwan, trying to redefine and evaluate Tu-Fong-Wu from a socio-cultural aspect under the multicultural era.
Chen Chiao-Hsin, who received her BA (Foreign Languages and Literatures major, with a minor in Philosophy) from the college of Liberal Arts of National Taiwan University in 2008, is now a student in the Graduate Institute of Dance Theory, Taipei National University of the Arts, Taiwan, and majors Cultural Study and Criticism.
Chen, Taiyueh (Taipei National University of the Arts)
Implicit Avant-Garde: How Did Legend Lin’s Dancers embody the conflict with the “Attitude” of Modern Society (Saturday, 3:45 p.m.)
Modernity is, not only an environmental circumstance on the outside, but an “attitude” inscribed on individual through practices. However, how is Legend Lin Dance Theater’s dance training as bodily practices associated with these attitudes? Are those similar to or contradicted with the trend of modernity in Taiwan? And how do the dancers embody a specific “attitude” based on the company’s unique aesthetic? In the end, I want to claim that the dancers’ attitude of living is a way to against the attitude of modernity. Thus the theater is an implicit form of Avant-Garde.
Taiyueh Chen is a dancer and researcher interested in the relationship between body, self and society. As a former dancer of Legend Lin Dance Theater, he was fascinated and challenged by the unique aesthetic and ways of living contradict the main stream. Thus as a graduate student in Taipei National University of the Arts, he takes the role of researcher to do participant observation of the company and interview with dancers.
Coulter, Todd (Colby College)
Headlong Dance Theater: Avalanche (Thursday, 8:00 p.m.)
Todd Coulter is an Assistant Professor of Theater and Dance at Colby College. His research interests include representations of the individual and the formation of identity in performance. He has published in several journals including Contemporary Theatre Review. A book is forthcoming from Mellen Press. Todd is an award winning actor (Prior in Angels in America, Guiteau in Assassins) and director. He holds a Ph.D. from CU-Boulder.
Cox, Aimee Meredith (Fordham University)
Moving the Field? The Perils and Possibilities of Performing Feminist Ethnography in Detroit (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
In this paper, I consider how the The Body and The City Project, a performance ethnographic project that explores the relationship between bodies, public space and emergent activism among young black women in Detroit, provides a model for disrupting the neoliberal co-optation of public space and the brown and black female bodies that move through and occupy these spaces. I explain how the project emerged as a response to the ways in which black women and girls experience the changing nature of safety, access, mobility, ownership and belonging in post-industrial Detroit.
Aimee Cox is an assistant professor of performance and African and African American Studies at Fordham University. Her research interests include embodiment and public space, youth culture, Black feminist theory and urban Anthropology. She is a former dancer with the Alvin Ailey Repertory Ensemble and directs a youth arts activist project called BlackLight. Her forthcoming book is Shapeshifters: Black Girls and the Choreography of Citizenship. Aimee is also the co-editor of the peer reviewed journal, Transforming Anthropology.
Davies Cordova, Sarah (University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee)
De-rat-ifying the Ballet Dancer: Nineteenth-Century Paris and its rats de l’Opéra. (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
As the Carnavalet’s exhibition Le Peuple de Paris au XIXe Siècle indicates, most categorisations about two thirds of Paris were determined by writers, sociologists and artists who highlighted the savage animal-like comportment of the working class. With Paris as the cultural center of Europe, why were young dancers also ostracised and categorised as rats? Gautier, Roqueplan, Balzac and Véron rationalise the appelation in terms of their constant nibbling. This presentation contextualises the “animalisation” of the young dancer within a discourse which created human monsters of “others” counters the bourgeois, misogynous stereotype of the dancing rat.
Sarah Davies Cordova is Associate Professor of French at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Her interdisciplinary research in dance, writing the body, and  French and Francophone literatures moves across the Atlantic to and from Haiti and the Antilles, Africa and France and spans the 19th-21st centuries.  It includes her book Paris Dances: Textual Choreographies in the Nineteenth-century French Novel, and contributions to The Cambridge Companion to Ballet and New writings about dance and culture: dancing bodies, living histories.
De la Cruz, Meiver (Northwestern University)
Utopian Performatives at the Arabic Nightclub: Community, Pleasure, and Affect at the Belly Dance Show (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
Scholarship on U.S. based Middle Eastern nightclubs has historicized the role of these spaces in relationship to developments in diasporic music traditions in the U.S. starting in the 1950’s. This essay engages a theoretical and ethnographic analysis of the belly dance show and the social dance performances inside the Middle Eeastern nightclub, exploring their political potential within contemporary diasporic communities in post 9/11 US. The essay explores the role of dance in the creation and sustenance of pan-Middle Eastern identities, in spaces where multiple sites of national origin and religious affiliation find common political ground through consuming and performing dance.
Meiver De la Cruz is a PhD student in the Department of Performance Studies at Northwestern University, in Evanston, IL. She also holds a Master's Degree in Gender and Cultural Studies from Simmons College.
Dickason, Kathryn (Stanford University)
Stepping into a Spiritual Economy: Medieval Choreomania and the Circulation of Urban Sanctity (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
While the numerous eruptions of choreomania (dance mania) in medieval France, Flanders, and Germany are often included in the historiography of early dance, scholars generally reduce this phenomenon to a mass pathology. Departing from a diagnostic analysis, this project localizes and historicizes choreomania by examining its impact on the religious life of medieval cities. Despite their aberrant symptoms reported by chroniclers (frenetic stomping, gesticulations, and convulsions), choreomaniacs actually participated in more mainstream spiritual economies by activating urban piety. The paper examines how choreomania enabled a mode of spiritual currency that effectively reinvigorated pilgrimage, religious tourism, and devotion to city saints.
Kathryn Dickason is a doctoral student in Religious Studies at Stanford University focusing on western medieval Christianity. Her general research interests include heresy, mysticism, gender, and embodied religiosity. She is currently exploring the ambivalence of dance in the Middle Ages embedded within ecclesiastical documents, secular literature, and dance iconography.
Dilley, Carol (Bates College)
Headlong Dance Theater: Avalanche (Thursday, 8:00 p.m.)
Carol Dilley has been teaching, choreographing, and performing internationally for nearly 25 years in the USA, Australia, Japan, Costa Rica, Sri Lanka and Europe. She was also cofounding director of the ongoing performance series and dance association La Porta, in Barcelona in 1991, created the series Dance Briefs, in Sydney, Australia in 2001 and in 2005, launched F.A.B. Winter Dance Showcase in Lewiston, Maine. Carol is an Associate Professor and has been Director of Dance at Bates College since 2003.
Dixon Gottschild, Brenda (Professor Emerita, Dance Studies, Temple University)
Thinking Joan, Drinking Dance (Saturday, 2:00 p.m.)
Keynote conversation, power point presentation, and discussion based on my new book, Joan Myers Brown & the Audacious Hope of the Black Ballerina - A Biohistory of American Performance, followed by a book signing event
Describing myself as an anti-racist cultural worker engaging in social artistry, I am a freelance author, performer, teacher, and consultant, frequently called upon to conduct race sensitivity seminars and movement theater workshops.  I am Professor Emerita, Dance Studies, Temple University, former writer and senior consultant for Dance Magazine, (Ph.D., 1981, New York University, Performance Studies), and author of three previous books.
Dodds, Sherril (Temple University)
Popular Embodiments of English Folk (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
Bellowhead is an 11-piece band whose repertoire is sourced within traditional English music. The band is acclaimed for its live performances, which are typified by a spectacular musicianship that alludes to the movement aesthetics associated with popular music gigs. The band members engage in ‘musical play offs’, enact heavy rock clichés, pogo on the spot, and flamboyantly play their instruments. In this paper, I draw on scholarship in folk studies and popular music performance to demonstrate how Bellowhead employs dance to signal its popular music identifications, acknowledge its folk heritage and comment knowingly upon the instability of that tradition.
Dr Sherril Dodds is Chair and Professor of Dance at Temple University. She has published two books, Dance on Screen: Genres and Media from Hollywood to Experimental Art (Palgrave, 2001) and Dancing on the Canon: Embodiments of Value in Popular Dance (Palgrave, 2011), and is co-editing a new anthology, Popular Dance and Music Matters (Ashgate), with Professor Susan Cook.
Dunagan, Colleen T. (California State University, Long Beach)
Reconfiguring the Social City Through Dance: Flash Mobs, Mass Media, and the Black Eyed Peas (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
A 21,000-person flash mob accompanied the 2009 Black Eyed Peas performance of “I Gotta Feeling” for the premiere of Oprah Winfrey’s 24th season premiere. While flash mobs have been cited as a subversive action that reconfigures the city space and manifests the virtual within the real, the BEP/Oprah flash mob was a commercial venture designed as a publicity vehicle, rather than a critical inhabiting of the city’s geography. This paper considers how mass media appropriates the potentially subversive flash mob form and transforms it into a politically conservative movement choir, putting dance and urban communities to work in producing nationalism.
Colleen Dunagan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Dance at California State University, Long Beach. She holds a Ph.D. in Dance History and Theory from the University of California, Riverside. Her work appears in Dance Research Journal, Topoi: An International Review of Philosophy, and The International Journal of the Arts in Society. Dunagan's research explores the myriad of ways in which dance participates in mass media forms.
D’Amato, Alison (University of California, Los Angeles)
Bodies Under the Influence: Anne Bass, Sy Sar, and the Politics of Patronage (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
This paper interrogates the role of individual patronage in choreographic production, focusing on the extent to which such support exerts a profound influence on the dancing body. It is grounded in a close analysis of the relationship between patron Anne Bass and dancer Sokvannara “Sy” Sar as represented in Bass’s 2010 documentary, “Dancing Across Borders.” By deconstructing the documentary’s themes of discovery, rescue, and elite cultural authority, this analysis lends a particular urgency to questions that dance studies scholars can and should pose more widely – namely, what dances are being made, for whom, and with what resources.
Alison D'Amato is pursuing a PhD in UCLA's Department of World Arts and Cultures/Dance where her work focuses on scoring and notational practices. She holds an MA in European Dance Theater Practice from Laban and a BA in Philosophy from Haverford College. As a choreographer and performer, Alison's work has been presented in Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, England, and Poland. Her writing on performance can be found in Choreographic Practices, itch, and Native Strategies.
Elkins, Leslie (Rowan University)
Leslie Elkins, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dance at Rowan University, teaches theory and technique courses specializing in improvisational composition and performance. Her current research focuses on the philosophy and use of play in education, as well as how the arts festival, Prospect New Orleans, can be used as a model of urban regeneration.
Escobar, Ninoska M’bewe (Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation)
Pearl Primus and auto/body/graphy (Sunday, 11:00 a.m.)
Based on my reading of Pearl Primus’ seminal choreographies Hard Time Blues, The Negro Speaks of Rivers and Strange Fruit (1943), I am proposing auto/body/graphy as a critical tool for understanding the body as an historical, experiential, and creative text. As an example of auto/body/graphy, Primus’ choreographies communicate complex identities that reflect one and many simultaneously. Auto/body/graphy recognizes the Black dancing body as auto/body/graphical, a repository of the Black experience and a site for individual and collective expression. At the center of auto/body/graphy are the intersections of Black history, American history, dance history, and their representation.
Ninoska M’bewe Escobar is a doctoral student in Performance as Public Practice at the University of Texas-Austin. She performed in the original cast of “Fame” and in numerous concert stage productions and venues, including Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Jacob’s Pillow, and the NextWave Festival at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. She has created original works for the performance group M’Word! and is a recipient of an Audelco Award for outstanding Black Theater Choreography.
Farrugia, Kathrina (Faculty of Education, Royal Academy of Dance)
Dancing through the archives in Reggio Emilia: tracing the heritage of Aterballetto and William Forsythe within the Teatro Romolo Valli Archives (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
This paper traces a personal journey through performance histories as I explore the impact of concert dances located in the archives of Teatro Romolo Valli in northern city of Reggio Emilia in Italy. The performance histories embedded in the wealth of film recordings choreograph a historical space that fosters the embodiment of ideas and philosophies of dance makers. I will explore the creative relationships between Aterballetto and William Forsythe between 1984 and the subsequent twenty-five years. Four point counter (Forsythe, 1996), performed by Aterballetto, provides insights into the heritage of (dis)placed dance heritage across the creative spaces of this city.
Kathrina Farrugia graduated from the Royal Academy of Dance (RAD) followed by the University of Surrey with a Masters in Dance Studies (Distinction). Supervised by Dr Giannandrea Poesio and Dr Anne Hogan, her doctoral thesis is titled ‘Transmodern Dance Practices: Angelin Preljocaj, Mauro Bigonzetti and revisions of Les Noces (1923)’. She set up three-fortyone dances in 2003, touring Fringe Festivals of Edinburgh (2004) and Brighton (2007) and is currently Lecturer in Dance Studies at the Faculty of Education (RAD).
Fogarty, Mary (York University)
The Spontaneous City: Urban Planning and Breaking Practice (Friday, 10:30 a.m.)
In this talk, I map the practice spots and performance venues that facilitate various street dance crews in the city of Toronto, Canada. To do so, I consider not only the physical distinctions but also the acoustic dimensions of space that inform dance practice. The purpose of this mapping is to consider the impact that decisions about urban planning have on dance practices. Ethnographic details provide additional indicators of how urban space is experienced through dance and how creative social groups navigate the unseen forces of policy and plan their improvisations in ways that have yet to be considered.
Mary Fogarty (b-girl) is an Assistant Professor of Dance at York University. She is a cultural sociologist with an interdisciplinary background including degrees in music, popular culture, and film studies. Her current ethnographic research focuses on cross-cultural exchanges in the history of breaking. She has been an invited speaker at Griffith University, Australia (keynote address for Creative Communities II), NYU (Show & Prove II), as well as an invited workshop leader for music therapists, dancers, choreographers, youth and prisoners. She has served on committees for PoP Moves, Pulse Ontario Youth Dance Conference, Manifesto Festival Dance Council, IASPM-UK, and IMHSD.
Fortuna, Victoria (Northwestern University)
Dance, Labor, and the City: Dancers for Life and Post-Crisis Buenos Aires (Friday, 10:30 a.m.)
Dancers for Life is a Buenos Aires based community dance project founded following the 2001 Argentine economic crisis. The group rehearses weekly in Grissinopoli, a factory recuperated by workers following its closure during the crisis. Collective creation generates embodied dialogue around labor rights, human rights, and the (im)possibility of connection in urban life. In this presentation, I consider how the project stages a productive relationship between dance, cooperative labor practices, and the transmission of histories of traumatic cultural memory that locates political possibility in the unification of creative and manual labor – practices traditionally separated by the logics of capitalist production.
Victoria Fortuna is a PhD candidate in the Department of Performance Studies at Northwestern University. Her dissertation focuses on the relationship between Buenos Aires, Argentina based contemporary dance and politics from the 1960s to the present, with specific attention to how dance remembers state violence. Victoria’s teaching and research interests include Latin/o American dance, dance and social change, and dance archival practices. Her writings have appeared in Aztlán, Performance Research, and Theatre Journal.
Fuller, Zack (CUNY Graduate Center)
Hyperdance in Tokyo: Urban Space as Subject in Tanaka Min’s Solo Dance Practice; 1975-1977 (Saturday, 3:45 p.m.)
In this paper I discuss the dances from Tanaka Min’s Hyperdance series that took place as unlicensed street performances. Frequently resulting in police intervention and arrest, these tested the limits of pedestrian “tactics” as defined by Michel de Certeau. In this paper I describe and analyze Tanaka’s solo practice of developing spontaneous choreography deeply informed by the body’s exposure to different physical environments and assess the potential for improvised dance to disrupt and defamiliarize daily urban life. My paper is accompanied by video footage of Hyperdance and informed by extensive personal interviews with Tanaka himself.
Zack Fuller is a doctoral candidate at the CUNY Graduate Center and has an MA in Theatre Studies from Brown University. His dissertation is on the experimental practice of dancer/choreographer Tanaka Min, with whom he performed throughout Japan, the U.S., and Europe from 1997 to 2001. His interests include intercultural performance, post-modern dance, and the Japanese avant-garde. He performs his own dances regularly in New York and Boston, in collaboration with some very amazing musicians.
Fung, Jenny Sky
B-Girls: The Anomaly of Breaking Culture (Sunday, 11:00 a.m.)
Gabriels, Jane (Concordia University, PhD student; Director, Pepatian)
George, Doran (UCLA)
Choreographing New York’s Rudeness: Exceptional behavior in Yvonne Meier’s objectionable dancing subjects of the early 1990s. (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
In the early1990s Yvonne Meier contested prevalent opinions about New York street-culture within the American mainstream. Working in Manhattan’s downtown dance scene she cultivated an objectionable dancing subject that embodied “New York rudeness.” Gotham’s reputation was based on the presumption that indifference and impropriety were breaking self-evident protocols of interaction. Meier critiqued the discursive production of stereotypes about her city by characterizing American propriety as culturally arrested and constructing bodies that flouted its mores. In The Shining Meier implemented strategies from the somatic technique “Authentic Movement”; she contravened theatrical decorum using excessive intimacy with the audience intertwined with disturbing disregard.
Doran George is a dancer and an artist attaining a PhD at UCLA. Doran has been publically funded in the UK, Finland, Holland, and the US. Doran sustains a participatory arts practice with diverse constituencies such as through residency with the Alzheimer’s Association in LA. Doran has danced for a diversity of choreographers, is published in academic and art journals, teaches in university and professional dance contexts, and curates symposia and performance exploring identity-deconstruction.
Gerdes, Ellen (Temple University, Drexel University)
Chinese Dance and Beijing Opera Ensembles at the Folk Arts Cultural Treasures School (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
Just north of Philadelphia’s Chinatown exists a K-8 charter school that proves urban areas are fertile ground for opportunities not just in dance performance, but also in dance education. The Folk Arts Cultural Treasures School (FACTS), through its “education that engages students with culture and community,” serves an essential role in Philadelphia’s Chinese community by supporting local artists, building an attentive audience for folk arts, and providing a site for cultural preservation and innovation. Through extensive observation of teaching practices and auto-ethnographic research, I explore the notion of cultural memory in relation to two FACTS ensembles– Beijing Opera and Chinese dance.
Ellen Gerdes, EdM, currently teaches dance at Temple University, Drexel University, the Folk Arts Cultural Treasures School, and in Philadelphia’s public schools. Her work as a dance educator is deeply informed by her ethnographic research and written scholarship on dance of the Chinese Diaspora. In Philadelphia, she performs for independent choreographers, and as a member of the Mendelssohn Club Choir and the Leah Stein Dance Company.
Gerecke, Alana (PhD Candidate, Simon Fraser University)
Curbside Attention: Paul-André Fortier’s Solo 30x30 (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
In “Curbside Attention,” I ask: what happens when a performance bypasses the ritual associated with preparing for a theatrical experience and, instead, comes into the streets and demands curbside attention? How do these performances shape our experience of publicness? I forward a reading of Solo 30x30, choreographed and danced by Montreal-based artist Paul-André Fortier, as a performed investigation and destabilization of being-in-public.
A recipient of a 2011 Trudeau Doctoral Scholarship, Alana Gerecke's research brings public space research together with performance and dance studies to examine the social implications of site-based dance in urban spaces throughout North America. Also an active professional contemporary dancer, she is a co-founder of the interdisciplinary and site-specific performance group, Behind Open Doors Arts Collective (2004-present).
Goldberg, Meira (Fashion Institute of Technology, Ballet Hispanico)
Moonless Night, Perfumed Garden: Black African Presences in the Music and Dance of Medieval Seville (Friday, 10:30 a.m.)
The over-arching importance of diasporic black Africans as creators of popular musics and dances is widely acknowledged. African polyrhythmic musics hold a triplet which is also duple, an African hemiola meeting its cousin in the vernacular substrates of early modern Andalusia. Where did this hemiola, extant in Spain at the inception of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, come from? This paper examines the music and dance of medieval Seville – Islamic from 790 until 1248, a locus of the slave trade in 15th and 16th centuries, now known as the cradle of Flamenco, to glean presences of black Africa.
Widely recognized as a master teacher and performer, Meira has performed in Spain with many of the giants of Flamenco, and in the U.S. has been first dancer, founding member and muse to several premier companies such as Carlota Santana Flamenco Vivo, Fred Darsow Dance,  and Pasion y Arte. Meira also holds an M.F.A. in choreography as well as an Ed.D in dance history from Temple University, and has published numerous articles on Flamenco history.
Goldstein, Jennie H. (Stony Brook University)
High Above the Urban Din: Passed Movement Transmission in Trisha Brown’s Roof Piece (1971) and Christian Jankowski’s Rooftop Routine (2007) (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
This paper examines two innovative projects featuring passed movement in urban settings—choreographer Trisha Brown’s Roof Piece (1971) and video artist Christian Jankowski’s Rooftop Routine (2007)—and argues that call and response is a powerful tool for transmission both within cityscapes and across artistic mediums. Reverberating from the exterior urban environment to the interior white cube of the gallery to the individual moving body, passed movement also traverses decades and contexts, from 1970s experimental choreography to early 21st century multi-media installation art. This method evinces the resilient mutability of movement and the unsteady line between urban and embodied space.
Jennie Goldstein is a PhD candidate in Art History and Criticism and Graduate Council Fellow at Stony Brook University where she works on convergences of art and dance in the 1960s and early 1970s. She is also a Joan Tisch Teaching Fellow at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.
Graham, Amanda Jane (University of Rochester, Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies)
Out of Site: Trisha Brown’s Roof Piece (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
A SoHo pioneer, choreographer Trisha Brown created site-specific dances reflective of her changing neighborhood. Her work, in particular her choreographic feat Roof Piece, performed along SoHo’s skyline, is reflective of the shifting socio-historical moment. By examining the physical, temporal, social, and symbolic space between Brown’s dancers positioned upon the rooftops of SoHo, as well as the historic space between the performance of 1971 and that of 1973, its recent restaging in June 2011 along the High Line in Chelsea, this paper argues that Roof Piece’s gestural movements are a kinetic parallel for the contemporaneous political movements in Lower Manhattan.
Amanda Jane Graham is a doctoral candidate in the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester. A former New York City public school teacher and community organizer, Graham has an M.A. in Communication and Culture from York University and an M.S. in Education from Brooklyn College. Graham’s dissertation, “The Myth of Movement: Trisha Brown and Lucinda Childs Dancing on the New York City Grid,” examines post-Judson site-situated choreography.
Griffiths, Dionne (PhD Student, Temple University)
Mary Hinkson: Dance, Duality and Selfhood (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
Mary Hinkson was one of the first African-Americans in the Martha Graham Company and she danced with the company from 1951 to 1973. I specifically discuss her representation of womanhood in Donald McKayle’s Rainbow ‘Round My Shoulder (1959) and her acquisition of the role of Circe in Graham’s piece, Circe (1963). Additionally, I address how the public sphere of being a professional dancer and the private sphere of being a wife and mother intersected in Hinkson’s life. Utilizing African-American feminist thought, I explore how Hinkson negotiated her career path and asserted her voice as an African-American woman.
Dionne Griffiths is a PhD student in Dance at Temple University. In 2011, she presented dance research at the 1st Annual Edna Manley College/Rex Nettleford Arts Conference in Jamaica. Dionne was also a Fulbright Fellow to Trinidad for dance from 2006-2007. She earned her M.A. in Choreography from UNC-Greensboro and her B.A. in Comparative Women’s Studies from Spelman College. Her research interests include African American women pioneers in modern dance and women choreographers from Jamaica.
Griffiths, Dionne (PhD Student, Temple University)
Introduction to Keynote Address: “Thinking Joan, Drinking Dance” (Saturday, 2:00 p.m.)
The introduction highlights the keynote speaker Brenda Dixon Gottschild and her journey of illuminating the rich dance legacy of Joan Myers Brown, founder of Philadanco and the Philadelphia School of Dance Arts.
Dionne Griffiths is a PhD student in Dance at Temple University. In 2011, she presented dance research at the 1st Annual Edna Manley College/Rex Nettleford Arts Conference in Jamaica. Dionne was also a Fulbright Fellow to Trinidad for dance from 2006-2007. She earned her M.A. in Choreography from UNC-Greensboro and her B.A. in Comparative Women’s Studies from Spelman College. Her research interests include African American women pioneers in modern dance and women choreographers from Jamaica.
Guenther, Amy
Express Whose Self?: Queer Male Dancing Bodies of Color and the Female Pop Diva in Madonna’s Blond Ambition Tour (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
Feminist scholars and the media repeatedly address and interpret the (hyper)sexualities of female pop divas. Yet few consider how the divas’ utilization of her back-up dancers, shapes her (re)presentation of social hierarchies. This paper examines Madonna and her dancers during her performance of “Express Yourself” in her Blond Ambition Tour featured in the 1991 documentary Madonna: Truth or Dare. I argue that despite Madonna’s problematic positioning as the dominant white heterosexual body over the male dancers’ queer bodies of color, the choreography also offers several empowering spaces for the dancers to showcase their virtuosity and, at times, agency.
Amy Guenther is a PhD student in the Performance as Public Practice Program at the University of Texas at Austin. She completed her MA in Theatre Studies at Miami University and her BFA in Musical Theatre at Catawba College. Her research focuses on the intersections of feminist theory and historiography with contemporary performances.
Hall, Joanna (Kingston University, London)
Heterocorporealities: intertextuality and hybridity in contemporary popular dance (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
In this paper I explore the use of popular dance in the performance of identities in urban club cultures. In particular, I examine how the dance practices found in contemporary UK drum ‘n’ bass club culture suggest evidence of cultural hybridity and a socially orientated notion of intertextuality. I describe the drum ’n’ bass dancing body as heterocorporeal: a hybridized body where knowledge and beliefs about cultural groups actively intersect to create new meaning and significance through dance.  I conclude this paper by suggesting heterocorporealities as a productive methodology for the analysis of other contemporary popular dance forms.
Joanna Hall is Principal Lecturer in Dance Studies at Kingston University, London. She completed her PhD at the University of Surrey in 2009, focusing on the popular dance practices of electronic dance music club cultures. She is a founding member of the PoP Moves research committee, and has contributed to Dodds, S. & Cook, S. (eds) (forthcoming) Bodies of Sound: Studies Across Popular Music and Dance, and Lansdale, J. (ed) (2008) Decentring Dancing Texts: the Challenge of Interpreting Dances.
Haller, Melanie
Buenos Aires is everywhere - subjectivities and territories in Tango Argentino (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
Body techniques are always cultural techniques as Mauss establish. What happens if a cultural technique, such as Tango Argentino, spreads all over the world and no longer pertains to only one culture? Tango as a body technique has no territorial history, but within the context of mythologization, it has a place of origin. During this mythologization, the territory of Buenos Aires is symbolically transferred to other countries, cities and places. The key theme of this lecture is the thesis that this (de-)territorial transfer of the dance Tango produces de-territorialized subjectivities.
Melanie Haller, sociologist, studied sociology, literature, philosophy and educational science at the University of Hamburg. She works as an assistant at the department of human movement science at the University of Hamburg. In April she finished her dissertation entitled ‘Moved Intersubjectivities – a praxeological perspective on Tango Argentino’. Her research focuses on: body- & movement-sociology, subject theory, cultural sociology, popular dance cultures and qualitative methods.
Hamp, Amanda (Luther College)
Their Hands in the Dirt: How Kazuo Ohno and Stephanie Skura Cultivate Dance Practices from Nature (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
As city-based artists, Kazuo Ohno and Stephanie Skura have each created for themselves experiences of “nature.” Skura’s suburban garden and Ohno’s rural excursions are individual pursuits, but each fits into larger environmental movements. Like contemporary sustainable agriculture, their work yields such themes as interconnectedness, non-separateness and abundance. Ohno’s and Skura’s respective cultivated and visited natural environments are mapped onto their bodies and artistic practices. From the environments, each artist harvests, relates to and embodies non-human images and processes. They seek relationship with other, and cultivate alterity in themselves, as ways to expand sense of “self” and place in the world.
Amanda Hamp is on the faculty at Luther College where she teaches and choreographs in the dance program, and teaches in the college’s interdisciplinary Paideia program. Her compositional and performance work are ongoing, and she is a certified teacher of Open Source Forms. Hamp holds degrees from Luther College (B.A), the Laban Centre for Movement and Dance (Professional Diploma in Dance Studies), and the University of Iowa (M.F.A).
Harlig, Alexandra (The Ohio State University Department of Dance)
Mimetic Movement in Angola’s Dança Kuduro; Historically Layered Space and Sociality (Sunday, 11:00 a.m.)
This paper explores the use and production of urban space and sociality in the musseques (shantytowns) of Luanda, Angola, through the inhabitants’ participation in dança kuduro, a popular dance form emerging at the end of Angola’s civil war in 2002. Utilizing Lefebvrian categories of space, and Mikhail Bakhtin’s conception of the regenerating power of the grotesque, I situate the practice of Kuduro—its mimetic and contortive movement in particular—as a way for musseque inhabitants to mediate the associational body in the history of violence and recovery in their urban space.
Alexandra Harlig is pursuing a PhD in Dance Studies at The Ohio State University, focusing on popular dance in the African diaspora. Throughout her research the themes of the urban, global, and cosmopolitan are in constant negotiation with (re)localization of widely disseminated forms, and the physical and social marginality of innovative populations. She is particularly interested in the role of traditional and social media in the cycle of development, dissemination, and appropriation of popular forms.
Harris, Jessica (Pomona College)
Flash Mobs: Performing the Commercial Paradoxes of the Information Age (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
The dawn of the information age has decentralized cultural production and turned our consumer paradigm on its head. Companies are scrambling to adapt, attempting to develop more synergistic relationships with consumers. Flash mobs, such as T-Mobile’s Life is for Sharing campaign, are examples of how companies are attempting to connect with consumers in non-traditional ways. Yet flash mobs undermine the consumer paradigm because their value is generated from popularity, they can be produced essentially for free and they challenge the privatization of public space. This paper examines how flash mobs illustrate the paradoxes of our consumer paradigm in the Information Age.
Jessica Harris is a founding member of Shen Wei Dance Arts and danced with the company from 2000-2009. In 2007, Ms. Harris joined Shen Wei in choreographing material for the Opening Ceremonies of the 2008 Beijing Olympics. In addition, Ms. Harris has produced numerous shows in her hometown of Durham, North Carolina and has taught master classes throughout the US and abroad. Currently Ms. Harris teaches at Pomona College.
Heisler, Wayne Jr. (The College of New Jersey)
Antony Tudor’s Dark Elegies and the Affirmation of Mahler’s Body, 1937–1947 (Saturday, 3:45 p.m.)
Recent scholarship notwithstanding, the historiographies of dance and music remain largely separate. I focus on Gustav Mahler’s Songs on the Death of Children (1904) as choreographed for Antony Tudor’s Dark Elegies (premiered in 1937) as an example of the imperative for more inclusive, integrated histories. I demonstrate that Tudor’s reception of Mahler—and contemporary reception of Tudor’s Mahler—nuances truisms of music historiography, including: that Mahler was almost universally regarded as an obsolete Romantic in the 1930s and 40s; that bodily “readings” of Mahler’s music were only negative, fuelled by anti-Semitism; and that Mahler’s music was virtually unperformed from the Second World War to his “renaissance” in the early 1960s.
Wayne Heisler’s primary research interests lie in music and dance in the twentieth century. His publications include The Ballet Collaborations of Richard Strauss (Rochester, 2009) and “Choreographing Schumann” for Rethinking Schumann (Oxford, 2011). He is currently preparing an essay on ballets set to Strauss’s Four Last Songs for a collection tentatively titled The Total Work of Art: Foundations, Articulations, Inspirations (Berghahn). Heisler is an associate professor of Historical and Cultural Studies in Music at The College of New Jersey.
Herzogenrath, Jessica Ray (Texas A&M University, PhD Candidate)
Building National Character: Urbanization, Americanization and Folk Dance in Chicago, 1890 - 1940 (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
This paper argues that folk dance as employed by Progressive social settlement workers both bridges and contests the cosmopolitanism of American cities. Many Progressives professed appreciation for immigrant cultures; however, they also deconstructed and reassembled forms to suit social programs. Analysis of how teachers taught folk dance to both immigrants and native-born Americans illuminates tensions between Old and New Worlds, folk and modern, and rural and urban. Using Chicago as an example, this study examines how “Americanizers” learned about immigrant cultures through folk dance and managed urban diversity through Americanization programs aimed at establishing “proper” body behaviors for immigrants.
Jessica Ray Herzogenrath is a PhD Candidate in History at Texas A&M University. She holds an MA in American Dance Studies from Florida State University and a BA in History from Northwestern University. Her research explores American vernacular performance and the intersections of gender, ethnicity, race and class in the early twentieth century. Ms. Herzogenrath continues to perform, choreograph and teach and has recently received a Texas A&M Vision2020 Dissertation Improvement Award.
Hooper, Colleen (Temple University, Dance PhD Candidate)
Martha Bowers and Dance Theatre Etcetera: Dancing with the Community On the Waterfront in Red Hook, Brooklyn (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
Martha Bowers’ 1993 performance On the Waterfront gave Red Hook neighborhood residents agency in subverting negative stereotypes and imagining a new future for their community. A central fact of the performance was that community members performed with Bowers’ company of professional dancers and musicians. Senior citizen women and students from Public School 15 were among the performers, and Bowers’ inclusion of these women and children gave voice to individuals who were intrinsically linked to the neighborhood. Utilizing Jan Cohen-Cruz’s community-based performance methodology, I will explore how participants created collective meaning through choreographic images of Red Hook’s past, present and future.
Colleen Hooper is a dancer, choreographer, and writer and she directs Colleen Hooper Performance Projects. Her research explores community arts, cultural studies, and site-specific performance. Recent presentations include a paper at the Popular Culture Association/ American Culture Association Conference and she was awarded the PCA Michael Schoenecke Travel Grant. She received her Dance M.F.A. from Temple University with a Certificate in Community Arts and is currently a Temple University Fellow and Dance PhD candidate.
Hoshino, Yukiyo (Japan Conparative Literature Association)
Dance as a Cross-Cultural Media: Xiao-bang Wu’s life between Tokyo and Shanghai in the 1930s (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
This paper focuses on a Chinese modern dancer Xiao-bang Wu, who had studied German modern dance in Tokyo in the 1930s. We analyze the reasons for Wu’s three visits to Tokyo. In sum, Xiao-bang Wu decided to be a dancer to raise Chinese people’s resistance to Japan through his dances. In spite of this aim, he continued to study in the enemy nation of Japan, since Tokyo was a more advanced city for modern dance than Shanghai at the time. Furthermore, Xiao-bang Wu was a witness to part of the modern sphere of the Western world; the auditoriums in Tokyo.
Yukiyo Hoshino is Associate Professor of Chinese Literature and Gender Studies at Nagoya University. Her research interests lie mainly in Chinese modern dance history. She is the author of Taiwan Bunka Hyosyo no Genzai [Taiwanese Modern Culture](2009) and has published essays on Chinese modern literature, Taiwanese movies and Chinese modern dance history.
Jackson, Naomi (Arizona State University) and Megan Todd (Arizona State University)
Hung Up’s Utopian and Dystopian Moves (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
Our paper focuses on Madonna’s hit song and music video Hung Up (2005). This music video offers what we argue is a problematic yet often unquestioned utopian narrative of globalized popular culture in which gendered, racialized, classed and historicized differences are simultaneously mapped and collapsed on/through dancing bodies and the sonic and psychic spaces they occupy.

Naomi Jackson, PhD, is an Associate Professor at Arizona State University. She has served as a board member of SDHS and CORD, and oversaw the first international Dance and Human Rights Conference in 2005. Her books include Converging Movements: Modern Dance and Jewish Culture at the 92nd Street Y (Wesleyan University Press, 2002), Right to Dance: Dancing for Rights (Banff Centre Press, 2004) and Dance, Human Rights, and Social Justice: Dignity in Motion (co-edited with Toni Shapiro-Phim, 2008).

Megan Anne Todd received her Ph.D. in Theatre/Performance of the Americas (Arizona State University). She has published in the Journal of Pan African Studies, Theatre Journal and has a forthcoming chapter in the Sonic World of Dance Film. She is teaching and developing curriculum in cultural studies and somatics, as well as producing for Performance in the Borderlands. She is involved in ongoing performance-based research projects in the areas of social justice and wellness.

Jones, Adanna
We Fell In Love In a Hopeless Place: In search of the Carnivalesque within the US Pop-Performances of Rihanna (Sunday, 11:00 a.m.)
In this paper, I look to unveil the Caribbean/Carnival residues that remain in the possibly resistant performances of Rihanna. I investigate the traumatic yet tender love affair between the Caribbean pop-star and the US by focusing on how they use their (sexual) prowess and recognizability to navigate and negotiate the vacillating margins that continually attempt to construct their Caribbean identities vis-à-vis constructions of Black/African-American histories. My intention here is to ultimately decipher the layered ways in which she weaves in and out of vulgarity.
Adanna Jones is a 5th year PhD student in Critical Dance Studies at UCR. She received her BFA in Dance from Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University and has since performed in professional dance companies based in NYC, including Julia Ritter Performance Group and Souloworks. Currently, her research focuses on the circumscriptive politics of the Carnval dances throughout the Caribbean and its Diaspora.
Jung, Shing-Chin
The influence of the establishment of the college ballroom dance clubs in Taipei on the development of Taiwan ballroom dance competition (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
The ballroom dance in Taiwan has been developed over sixty years. Since 1960s, with the economic boom and open society, people in Taiwan gradually accept ballroom dance. Since 1990s, there are more and more competitions taken place in Taiwan which help to promote ballroom dance and thus it enhanced the sports aspect of the dance. Studying on the influence of the establishment of ballroom dance clubs in college to the development of ballroom dance competition, this research uses the literatures reviewing and interviewing of some professional competitors. The younger and younger participators in ballroom dance competition due to the establishment of the college clubs. In 1990s, the college students began to hold their own competition. This caused the related institutions noticing the influence of these students. Therefore, some institutions started to add more race groups in the competition. Leading more college students to learn this dance and it was also widely pushed to teenagers and even to children. Today, quite a few professional competitors are from college clubs. These all reveal that the college ballroom dance clubs are very important to the development of Taiwan ballroom dance after 1990s
Jung Shing-Chin, who received her BBA (International Business major) from the college of commerce of National Chengchi University in 2009, is now a student in the Graduate Institute of Dance Theory, Taipei National University of the Arts, Taiwan, and majors in dance education studies.
Kainer, Eden Elizabeth
Dancing with a Vengeance: Ritualized Sexual Aggression in Social Dance of the Ragtime Era and Beyond (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
What is partnered social dance but a ritualized embodiment of the battle of the sexes? The dramatic metaphoric possibilities of social dance reached one extreme in the Apache dance of the 1920’s, a dance evolved from the body of urban ragtime dances called “tough dances”, and which was a stylized kinetic imagining of the violent lifestyle of Parisian pimps and prostitutes. This paper analyzes contemporaneous public discourse about the Apache dance and draws connections to the level of physical and sexual aggression that we see in dancing tableaux presented in videos produced by several popular contemporary vocal artists.
Eden Kainer has presented often on the intersections of race, gender and sexuality with popular performance and is currently working as an independent scholar in the Philadelphia area. She recently completed her dissertation, “Racial Crossover in the Voices of Three Iconic American Performers: Ella Fitzgerald, Sophie Tucker, and Elsie Janis,” with Dr. Susan Cook as her advisor and received a Doctorate in Musicology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Kappenberg, Claudia (University of Brighton)
A choreographic reading of the film Entre’Acte (Friday, 6:30 p.m.)
This lecture-demonstration consists of a screening and discussion of the film Entr’acte, an avant-garde film from 1924, written by Francis Picabia and directed by René Clair. Set in Paris the film consists of a collage of urban scenes which subvert the everyday from which it borrows. The work will be discussed in the context of Screendance, a hybrid practice which combines cinematic and choreographic languages, moving images and moving bodies. Drawing on the writing of Malcom Turvey, Gilles Deleuze and Maya Deren, I will consider the relation between movement and image and the pivotal role of the film in a 20th century map of screendance and choreographic practices.
Claudia Kappenberg is a performance and media artists and course leader of the MA Performance and Visual Practices at the University of Brighton, UK. Her projects comprise single screen work as well as screen-based installations and live site-specific events and have been shown across Europe, the US and the Middle East. Claudia runs a Centre for Screendance at the University of Brighton and is Co-editor of the International Journal of Screendance.
Kattner, Elizabeth and Emma Davis (University of Michigan-Flint)
Meet the Flintstones: A New Generation of Community Dance Artists Renews a City Given up for Lost (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
Flint, Michigan is a paradigm of the deindustrialization that has devastated countless cities. In the past decade, Flint has been redefining itself through arts and education, allowing a new generation of independent community artists to use art as a vehicle for urban transformation. On site dance projects are being implemented with other grassroots visual art, music and theatre projects to engage members of the community, address relevant issues and explore viable solutions. By examining the work of the Flint Public Arts Project, this paper will illustrate how dance can play a vital role in changing the face of a city.
Elizabeth Kattner completed her PhD at the Free University Berlin where the focus of her research was the early life and work of George Balanchine. She lived and worked in Berlin for ten years and performed all over Germany with various ensembles. In addition to directing the Dance in Flint Schools program, she teaches ballet, dance history and dance education at the University of Michigan-Flint Department of Theatre and Dance. //Emma Davis is a lecturer at the University of Michigan-Flint in Flint, MI. She currently performs with musical artist Tunde Olaniran and is a company member of Vertical Ambition Dance Company. Ms. Davis collaborates with a diverse number of artists involved in organizations like the Flint Public Art Project, representing dance in the community. Recently, Emma choreographed for Buckham Gallery’s interactive performance exhibition, On the Line, based around the Flint autoworkers’ sit-down strike of 1936-37.
Katz Rizzo, Laura (Temple University)
The Sleeping Beauty Wakes Up in Philadelphia: Classical Ballet in the American City (Saturday, 3:45 p.m.)
In 1937, Philadelphians living through the Great Depression in an industrial Northeastern poverty-stricken city, witnessed the premiere of the first full-length American production of The Sleeping Beauty. The performance was choreographed and performed by the Philadelphia Ballet Company, under the leadership of American ballet pioneer, Catherine Littlefield. This presentation illuminates the historical artifacts remaining from this important production to discover emergent discursive trends. I conclude that in her staging of The Sleeping Beauty, as well as her establishment of a professional ballet company in Philadelphia, Catherine Littlefield struggled with but succesfully negotiated tensions that perpetually surround classical ballet: tradition and innovation.
Laura Katz Rizzo holds a Ph.D. in dance and women’s studies from Temple University, an Ed. M. in dance from Temple University, and a B.A. in History from The University of New Mexico. She is an accomplished pedagogue, choreographer, lecturer and scholar of ballet who has published and presented scholarly and choreographic work for professional institutions and organizations across the field of dance. She currently teaches both studio-based and theory courses in dance at Temple University.
Khubchandani, Kareem (Northwestern University)
Dancing Against the Law: Critical Moves in Bengaluru’s Gay Nightlife (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
This paper uses intersecting histories of dance and sexuality to situate my ethnographic study of Bangalore’s queer club spaces within discourses of risk and legality. Further, the paper elucidates the ways in which queer partygoers and organizers negotiate Bangalore’s fraught personality: the epitome of globalizing India, as well as a bastion of South Indian conservative politics. Attending to social and vernacular dance, this paper describes movement and gesture by queer people at private parties, nightclubs, bars, and on the streets to demonstrate how such performative eruptions act as critical responses to the policing of queer dancing bodies by the state.
Kareem Khubchandani is a Ph.D. student at Northwestern University's Performance Studies program. His dissertation project is a multi-sited ethnography of performance in queer South Asian communities.
Klein, Gabriele (University of Hamburg, Performance Studies)
Experiencing urban cultures, translating gestures: Pina Bausch’s choreographic view on global cities (Saturday, 3:45 p.m.)
Gabriele Klein / University of Hamburg / Germany. Experiencing urban cultures, translating gestures: Pina Bausch’s choreographic view on global cities Fear, hope, aspiration, desperation, human frailty, battle of the sexes, jealousy, courtesy — one might list up various human characteristics that are processed aesthetically in Pina Bausch’s choreographies. This lecture aims to show how the social habitus of cities and urban lifestyle patterns are translated into Pina Bausch’s international co-productions. The lecture enforces the thesis that the aesthetic of dance and choreography enables a specific translation of the urban in so far as it focuses on the choreographic order of the urban space and on the corporal aesthetic of urban cultures.
Gabriele Klein, Professor for Sociology of Movement and Dance, University of Hamburg. Recent books: „Electronic Vibration. Pop Kultur Theorie”, “Is this real? The Culture of HipHop“, “Performance”, “The choreographic toolbox”, “Emerging Bodies”. She is Director of Performance Studies Hamburg, Co-Director of the Research Center for Media and Communication at the University of Hamburg, Principal Investigator at the Graduate School für Media and Communication, member of the council of the German Association for Sociology, and member of the International Board of SDHS.
Kloppenberg, Annie (Colby College)
Headlong Dance Theater: Avalanche (Thursday, 8:00 p.m.)
Annie Kloppenberg is Assistant Professor at Colby College, artistic director of her Boston-based company, teaches and perfoms nationally with the improvisational ensemble, Like You Mean it, and serves on the Board of Green Street Studios in Cambridge, MA. www.anniekloppenberg.com; www.lymitrio.com; www.movingtargetboston.wordpress.com
Kloppenberg, Annie (Colby College) and Lauren Simpson (Harvard University)
Notes from the Field: Boston’s Dance Landscape, Thoughts on Training, Potential, and Action (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
Today, we access dance from around the world in one swift youtube search. Geography does not need to limit aesthetic approaches. We can simultaneously celebrate local traditions and broaden our views. Despite a rich history, there is a gap in available training for dancers in Boston. In honoring Movement Research, Ann Cooper Albright articulated a concept of “productive tension”—tension between training systems, movement exploration and dance as cultural representation. In our co-curated class series Moving Target, we hope to contribute such “productive tension” to dance in Boston. As practicing artists, we explore Boston’s strengths, holes, and needs.

Annie Kloppenberg is Assistant Professor at Colby College, artistic director of her Boston-based company, teaches and perfoms nationally with the improvisational ensemble, Like You Mean it, and serves on the Board of Green Street Studios in Cambridge, MA. www.anniekloppenberg.com; www.lymitrio.com; www.movingtargetboston.wordpress.com

Lauren Simpson is a performer and choreographer, teaches at Harvard University and Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, and has worked as a guest artist with the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange’s Summer Institute.

Lenart, Camelia (State University of New York at Albany)
A Different “Special Relationship”: Martha Graham and the British Cultural Luminaries John Gielgud, E. M. Forster, and Henry Moore (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
Challenging the idea that before her first European tours Martha Graham was an unknown artist in Europe, my paper demonstrates that the artist had a special relationship with three British cultural luminaries since the forties, which continued in time and space until the end of their lives. Related to the complicated context of the cultural diplomacy of the very sensitive Cold War years - with their restructuring of the dynamics of power, including in the cultural field - it is the story and history of a special artistic kinship, linked to the unlimited boundaries of the human spirit and body.
Camelia Lenart is a doctoral candidate at the State University of New York at Albany. Her doctoral dissertation focuses on Martha Graham’s European tours and the intricate way the European audience responded to them. Ms. Lenart presented in numerous national and international conferences, and her work was published in the USA, Canada, England, and Romania. She is the recipient of various awards, including a Mellon Fellowship from the Institute of Historical Research in London.
Lim, Wesley
Mesmerizing Metropolitan Meetings: Harry Graf Kessler’s Interaction with Ruth St. Denis in Berlin around 1900 (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
The diplomat, critic, and diarist Harry Graf Kessler was fascinated by the dancing body. He witnessed both the stifling balls of the late nineteenth century and the experimental works of the early modern dancers. While Ruth St. Denis was in Berlin in 1906, Kessler not only attended her performances but—along with others in his intellectual circle— inquired about her movement philosophy. In this paper, I argue that Kessler’s interaction with her caused a dramatic change in his movement aesthetics which resulted in a much more intellectual engagement with dance.
Wesley Lim’s studies in dance began at Emory University. Currently, he is an advanced Ph.D. candidate in German Literature at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on the representations of dance and city space in German literature and German film around 1900. He is finishing his dissertation entitled “Dancing in the City: Scenes from the Works of Endell, Rilke, Döblin and Lasker-Schüler.”
Luján, Andrea Melissa (Independent Scholar)
Dedication to José Clemente Orozco: Lester Horton’s American Testimonial (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
In 1953, Lester Horton choreographed, Dedication to José Clemente Orozco, paying tribute to the Mexican post-revolutionary muralist. Beyond a sheer transposition of Orozco’s iconography, Horton breathed life into the figural representations—transforming two-dimensional forms into a three-dimensional moving image, extended Orozco’s social realist themes to an American audience, and provoked American ideologies of freedom and national identity. This art/dance historiographical examination analyzes the export of Orozco’s art to the United States, evaluates Horton’s appropriation of the painter’s emblematic iconography, situates the choreography within Horton’s oeuvre, and explores its American reception.
Andrea Luján is a native of the Southwest. She danced with the Rosa Guerrero International Ballet Folklórico, Ballet Folklórico Aztlan de Tejas, Ballet East Dance Theater, and Teatro Paraguas. She received her BA with honors in art history from Columbia University’s School of General Studies, and is the author of, Coyolxauhqui: Illuminating the Essence of the Aztec Moon Goddess. In Manhattan, Luján dances with Calpulli Mexican Dance Company and is pursuing an interdisciplinary MFA degree.
Malinsky, Barbara Ferreri (SDHS)
Mary Ann Lee: Philadelphia’s Bridge to the Romantic Era (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
The career of Mary Ann Lee (1823-99) mirrors social developments in Philadelphia. So important was dance to the city’s social fabric that audiences and press took sides in the rivalry between ballerina Augusta Maywood and the endearing Lee, who earned the sobriquet, “Our Mary Ann.” In 1844, Lee left Philadelphia to study in Paris and returned with improved technique and authentic versions of French Romantic ballets never yet seen in the United States - La Fille du Danube, La Jolie Fille de Gand, and Giselle - her great contribution to American dance history. Partnered by George Washington Smith she performed these ballets in Philadelphia and beyond.
Barbara Malinsky received a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to research and curate an exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Dance in Pennsylvania : The Nation's First Steps, which comprised three centuries of dance in Pennsylvania. She is the biographer for John Durang, Mary Ann Lee, and Catherine Littlefield for the International Encyclopedia of Dance, Oxford University Press. She continues to research and write about dance for national and international publications. M.Ed., Dance, Temple University.
Mattingly, Kate (UC Berkeley)
Flash mobs: critique, commentary, choreography (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
The flash mob had its origins in Bill Wasik’s events in New York City that sought to disrupt consumer culture. Today, the flash mob is a popular trope in media culture,  appearing in commercials, television shows, and the 2011 film Friends with Benefits. This paper examines the evolution of the flash mob’s forms, with particular attention to ways it continues to attract fascination, to illuminate transgressions of mediated relationships, and to sustain the nonsensical in increasingly disciplined and codified routines. Although transformed by cooptation, the flash mob continues to offer corporeal experiences of social collectivity.
Kate Mattingly graduated from Princeton University with a degree in architecture and completed her master of fine arts degree in dance at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. Her articles about dance and performance have been published in newspapers, journals, and magazines. She has taught courses in dance history and criticism in the United States and in Europe. She is currently a student in the doctoral program in Performance Studies at UC Berkeley.
Mazzocca, Ann (Asst. Prof. in Theater and Dance, Christopher Newport University)
New York – Souvnans – Riverside: The Triangular Route of a Bicoastal Collaboration (Sunday, 11:00 a.m.)
The traces of interactions across cultures – in city, countryside, and suburb – are marked by intimacy and distance, center and periphery, appropriation and nostalgia. I intend to trace the genealogy of my MFA choreographic project Kolaborasyon / Haiti through my experiences within Haitian cultural communities in New York City, trips to the countryside of Haiti – perhaps considered peripheral in relation to the concept of the urban “center” yet central to my personal imaginary in the creation of choreography, coalescing within the suburban retreat of the Academy while simultaneously calling upon collaborators from the urban center, resulting in a bicoastal triangularly constructed choreography.
Ann Mazzocca is currently Assistant Professor of Dance at Christopher Newport University. Before completing an M.F.A. in Experimental Choreography from the University of California at Riverside she performed from 2001-2008 with NY-based Haitian and Afro-Cuban dance companies. She has conducted fieldwork for her research primarily in urban and rural Haiti and Havana and Matanzas, Cuba. Her choreography explores Afro-Caribbean folkloric themes through contemporary dance methods and has been presented on both coasts.
McPherson, Elizabeth (Montclair State University)
Bennington, Vermont: Unlikely Hot Spot for Modern Dance (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
During the Great Depression, in the town of Bennington, Vermont, the Bennington School of the Dance (1934-1942) began. The artistic climate present in a concentrated from for six weeks each summer meant no worries for anyone except study of new forms and creation of dances. Physical education teachers traveled across the country to learn, returning home with knowledge that laid the groundwork for modern dance. New York based choreographers Martha Graham, Hanya Holm, Doris Humphrey, and Charles Weidman premiered numerous works, building their repertory and choreographic expertise. This confluence of people and place ignited the modern dance movement, from Bennington across America.
Elizabeth McPherson, assistant professor and Dance Education Coordinator at Montclair State University, received a BFA from Juilliard, an MA from The City College of New York, and a PhD from New York University. She is the author of the book The Contributions of Martha Hill to American Dance and Dance Education, 1900-1995 as well as articles and reviews for various publications including Ballet Review, Dance Teacher Magazine, and The Journal of Dance Education.
Meglin, Joellen A. (Temple University)
Ruth Page, Paris, 1950-52: From Ballet Americana to Ballet Cosmopolitan (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
Ruth Page’s shift from ballet Americana to European opera with her “opera-into-ballet” La Revanche (Revenge) may seem odd, given her history of championing an American ballet that shed European and Russian influences. But Page’s cosmopolitan turn was both pragmatic and strategic, related to post-war politics and the Marshall Plan for European recovery. Turning to European Romanticism, she set a ballet condensation of Verdi’s 1853 Il Trovatore on Boris Kochno’s financially floundering Ballets des Champs-Elysees; commissioned Spanish designer Antoni Clavé to make costumes and sets; and played the role of “angel” to solidify her status as a cosmopolitan choreographer of the international ballet world.
Joellen A. Meglin is associate professor and former coordinator of doctoral studies in dance at Temple University. Her research has been published in Dance Research Journal, Dance Chronicle, and two Studies in Dance History monographs; another article is forthcoming this summer in Dance Research (UK). She has presented her research in Europe, Asia, and throughout North America, and is currently writing a book on Ruth Page, while serving as coeditor of Dance Chronicle.
Meninato, Pablo (Philadelphia University, School of Architecture)
Pablo Meninato has more than 20 years of experience as a practicing architect, teacher and scholar. He holds a Diploma of Architect from the Universidad de Buenos Aires, and Master of Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania. He has taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Universidad de Monterrey, University of Maryland, and he is currently teaching at the Philadelphia University, School of Architecture. Meninato is currently a PhD candidate at the UFRGS, Porto Alegre.
Mercer, Elliot Gordon (The Juilliard School)
Traversing Temporal Topographies: The Social Project of Dance Preservation (Sunday, 11:00 a.m.)
As an inherently temporal art form, dance perpetuates itself through social interaction. The preservation of historic dances and choreographic style relies on presence: dancers participate in the production and reproduction of knowledge by ‘being there,’ actively engaging in the re-embodiment of dance history. Through the repetitive process of transmitting movement from one body to another and one time to another, choreographies undergo transformations. Over time, such transformations lead to various iterations of historic dances, all of which claim authenticity to their original. Through an analysis of dance reconstruction, this presentation challenges the notion that dances are fixed choreographically and historically.
Elliot Gordon Mercer is a professional arts administrator, dramaturg, and performance historian. He graduated summa cum laude from St. Mary’s College of California and received an MA in Performance Studies at NYU. Elliot has danced professionally, performing principal roles in works by Antony Tudor, Paul Taylor, and Lynne Taylor-Corbett. His research focuses on documentary practices in performance and theories of dance reconstruction.
Merritt, Carolyn (Arcadia University, ThINKing Dance)
Buenos Aires, Dancing City (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
Tango’s global spread and Buenos Aires’ transformation into tourist/ tango “mecca” have yielded growing pains in this century-old dance.  Recently declared Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO, an initiative conceived to safeguard cultural traditions that confer a sense of identity, tango is undeniably impacted by such attention.  As tourists demand “authentic” experiences, tango’s global devotees threaten the very altar they bow down upon, while young Argentines negotiate uneasily between preservation and evolution.  This paper examines the reinvigoration of tradition and the rise of populist narratives of tango among young porteños in response to the confines of postcolonialism and tourism.
Carolyn Merritt holds a Ph.D. in anthropology and a B.A. in Modern Languages.  Her manuscript, Tango Nuevo, a study of the cultural politics of contemporary tango dance, will be published by University Press of Florida in 2012.  Carolyn teaches courses in anthropology and performance studies at Arcadia University, and she is a writer/ editor with Philadelphia's ThINKing Dance project.
Mezur, Katherine (Freie Universität Berlin )
A ’hood, a street, a storefront: 9XBerlin+Mumbai+Tokyo = Duration (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
This is an analysis of time and urban corporeality, based on the 27hr encounter/performance, “9,” devised in Berlin by Mumbai-based Nikhil Chopra, action/painter artist, and Berlin/Tokyo-based Kaseki Yuko, butoh performance artist. “9” is an encounter of bodies and cities (Tokyo, Mumbai) in Berlin. The work grew from these city-scapes of WWII, postwar, and postcolonial transformations into urban spaces with boundaries dividing bodies, buildings, and memories. How does duration mark these urban pasts, repeatedly destroyed, rebuilt, and memorialized? How does “urban” mark bodies and their movement? Can these urban acts reclaim the memories of captured peoples, walled and exploded cities, and the gaps between them?
Katherine Mezur is a dance theatre scholar recently based at the International Research Center, "Interweaving Performance Cultures," Freie University Berlin. Her research focuses on transnational dance-theatre, live-media performance in the Asia Pacific and choreographies of migration. She is author of Beautiful Boys/Outlaw Bodies: Devising Female-likeness on the Kabuki Stage (Palgrave) and manuscript, Kawaii: "Cute Girl Cultures in Contemporary Japanese Performance/Media." PhD U Hawai'i Manoa, Theatre/Dance; MA Dance Mills, BA Film Hampshire. Positions: UW Seattle, Cal Arts, Georgetown.
Midgelow, Vida L (University of Northampton)
Nomadism and Embodied Knowing in Improvised Movement Practices (Saturday, 3:45 p.m.)
A review of improvisation practices reveals a lexicon that is full of terms suggestive of journeys, flows, connectivities, metamorphosis and transformations. This language, and the dances that draw upon/generate them, are suggestive of temporal, corporeal and geographical shifts and embody underlying nomadic concepts. I will suggest these nomadisms reflect particularized ways of knowing and being, and that through them we have the potential to refigure subjectivities and promote a connectedness to the changing body and to the bodies of others.
Artist/academic Vida L. Midgelow is Professor in Dance and Choreographic Practices (University of Northampton). Her research led movement works have been presented internationally. She has published in various journals and books, including the monograph Reworking the ballet, in 2007. Her practice focuses upon somatic approaches to improvisation in movement and video installations. Recent works include: Threshold : Fleshfold, TRACE: playing with/out memory and currently the accumulative work: A Date with (my improvisation) Practice can be viewed at: http://danceimprovisationpractice.blogspot.com. She is also editor of the innovative peer reviewed journal Choreographic Practices and Chair of the Standing conference on Dance in Higher Education.
Mills, Rucyl (Artist/Performer)
Rucyl Mills is an audiovisual artist, music producer and singer who experiments with sound and visual stimulus. Original member of the Goats, an alternative hip hop group in the 90s, Rucyl continued a rogue musical life in New York, making beats, experimental soul and jazz mashup tracks until returning to her hometown of Philadelphia in 2009. She is co-founder, performer and blogger of futuretronic label & audiovisual electronic group Saturn Never Sleeps.
Millyard, Karen
Power, class and the late-Georgian ballroom (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
Late-Georgian London boasted of balls virtually every night during The Season, offering a unique venue for the reinforcement of class-based social arrangements. The discipline of the Baroque form helped to sustain social order, while the changing nature of country-dancing helped to subvert it. Using late-18th and early 19th-century fiction and life-writing texts, I propose to examine the urban ballroom as a microcosm of late-Georgian society: social dances, the structures and norms they embodied, and the gradual disruption of those forms that accompanied the socio-political upheavals of the late 18th century.
Karen Millyard, an MA student in Dance Studies at York University in Toronto, specializes in late-Georgian social dance. Millyard co-created and co-organized the conference English Country Dancing: Rooted in the Past, Dancing into the Future. A teacher and consultant, she works in museums, heritage sites, schools and the community as well as leading workshops and balls to bring the dances of the past to the general public of today.
Minarti, Helly (Roehampton University)
Alternative Modernism: Jakarta Dance Movement 1969-1971 (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
Like any other global cities, Jakarta enabled the articulation of new dance modernism in the late 1960s, starting with the opening of the TIM Arts Centre in 1968. It became the site for (what I call) the Jakarta Dance Movement, an artists-initiated intercultural workshops, between 1969-1971. This dancing-choreographic experimentation was linked to local/global modernity, to discourses of globalization and Indonesian nation-state post 1965 Anti-Communist mass murder swiftly followed by Americanisation. My paper revisits this cultural-corporeal platform, employing modernity/modernism theories; discursive ways modern vision/ imagination were conceived through intricate ramification of national politics, city cultural policy and Cold War geopolitics to which these artists had to situate/negotiate their local differences, in search of modern dancing bodies.
Helly Minarti is in the process of submitting her PhD dissertation, expecting to graduate in Fall 2012. Her entries to dance studies are through years of involvement in practice as dance writer, manager as well as curator with main interest in Asian-informed dance modernism, historiographies and contemporary dance practice. Her portfolio includes producing an award-winning dance film (2003), co-curating the 3rd Asia-Europe Dance Exchange (2004) in Berlin and Project Manager for Akram Khan Archive (2009-2011).
Morris, Gay
Leonide Massine’s Parade (Saturday, 3:45 p.m.)
Parade (1917) introduced urban mass culture to the rarified world of ballet. At the same time it incorporated avant-garde elements of cubism and futurism that made reference to the modern city. Although Parade has been given much scholarly attention, most of it has gone to Picasso’s décor, Satie’s score, and Cocteau’s libretto. This paper argues for the importance of Leonide Massine’s choreography and for the influence of cubism on it. Massine used cubist principles to help develop a signature style that reflected the pace and temper of 20th century urban life.
Gay Morris is a New York-based art and dance critic. Her book, A Game for Dancers: Performing Modernism in the Postwar Years, 1945-1960, won the 2007 De La Torre Bueno Prize. She is the editor of an anthology, Moving Words, Rewriting Dance (Routledge 1996) and, with Jens Richard Giersdorf, is editor of the forthcoming Choreographies of 21st Century War. She serves as the reviews editor of Dance Research Journal and is on the SDHS Editorial Board.
Morrison, Margaret (Barnard College and the American Tap Dance Foundation)
The Miller Brothers and Lois: Agency, Exploitation, and Spectacle in Philadelphia’s Tap and Flash Act (Friday, 10:30 a.m.)
The Miller Brothers and Lois were one of Philadelphia’s most renowned flash tap acts, performing death-defying wings, over-the-tops, trenches, and precision tap choreography on five-foot high pedestals. My research offers new information on Lois Bright Miller’s career and analyzes 1947 film footage of the act for what it suggests about the performance of race and gender in virtuosic, acrobatic tap. Flash contributed to the evolution of jazz and developed into a spectacular visual expression of the dynamics of big band swing. In more recent decades, Broadway productions have utilized flash vocabulary to symbolize the exploitation of black dancing bodies.
Margaret Morrison (MFA in Dance, Hollins Univeristy/ADF) is a rhythm tap soloist, choreographer, playwright, and researcher. Her performance and research projects explore gender, race, sexuality, and history in tap dance. She teaches tap at Barnard College, was a founding member of the ATDO, directed by Brenda Bufalino, and is currently Education Advisor for the American Tap Dance Foundation. She recently contributed the John W. Bubbles essay for Dance Heritage Coalition’s America’s Irreplaceable Dance Treasures. www.MargaretMorrison.com
Murphy, Ann (Mills College, Assistant Professor)
Bringing The Country To Town: The Multi-local Landscape in Selected Works by Molissa Fenley and Trisha Brown (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
“Bringing the Country to Town: The Multi-Local Landscape in Selected Works by Molissa Fenley and Trisha Brown” examines how choreographers Molissa Fenley and Trisha Brown radically overlay seemingly untamed or unexpected movement and motifs onto the hyper-structured body of the city, destabilizing the regulated arena of theatrical space and, by association, the fixed and highly planned cityscape. The result a multi-local understanding of space and reality that enlarges our experience and informs us that the town and the country are mutually reflective and interpenetrating aspects of a complex experiential system, one that is both ordered and wild.
Ann Murphy is Assistant Professor of Dance at Mills College and a long-time dance critic in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is currently editing a collection of essays about the 30-year career of Molissa Fenley.
Murray, Peggy L. (Ohio University)
Popular dancing in Peru’s late eighteenth century: the dances in the Martínez Compañón Codex (Friday, 10:30 a.m.)
In the late eighteenth century the Bishop of Trujillo, Peru, Baltasar Jaime Martínez Compañón, toured the extensive northeastern portion of the Viceroyalty of Peru to acquaint himself with his jurisdiction. The Bishop compiled illustrations and data to document the sights and sounds of the region in a collection known today as the Martínez Compañón Codex. Among the over 1,400 images contained in this compilation, are 36 renderings of dances, and scores for 20 pieces of popular dance music. I explore the Codex’s dances through primary and secondary texts and through embodied ethnographic information.
Peggy L. Murray is a Ph.D. candidate in Performance Studies at Ohio University's School of Interdisciplinary Arts. Her dissertation research focuses on dance in Colonial Latin America, and in Peru, specifically.
Nicely, Megan (University of San Francisco)
Akira Kasai’s “Voice Power”: Pre-articulations of the Social Body (Saturday, 3:45 p.m.)
In this paper, I investigate how a body’s encounter with language might constitute a social body and responsible action. Focusing on my own experience of butoh artist Akira Kasai’s “voice power”—a practice that creates a “between-space” from which movement arises—I ask how forces coming “from the outside,” such as language and history, can be used by dancers to live out different futures. An early member of Hijikata’s company similarly interested in metaphysical questions of being, temporality, and consciousness, Kasai’s own work also departs from Hijikata’s, posing ways to rethink the paradox of contemporary urban social coherence.
Megan Nicely is a dancer, choreographer, and scholar. She has presented her own butoh and “release-based” work on both US coasts and abroad and frequently collaborates with media (and other people?) within live performance environments. She has published in Performance Research and TDR and is currently completing her dissertation in performance studies at New York University. She is an Assistant Professor in the dance program at University of San Francisco.
Nicholas, Larraine (University of Roehampton, London)
Walking/Dancing: an historical (pre)amble (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
Walking as a research method can be an encounter with the meaning-making inherent between people and places. In the real location of past events it stimulates thought, imagination and memory. My research brings together three sixtieth anniversary celebrations in London 2011 – 2013 (the Festival of Britain, 1951; the accession of the Queen, 1952; the Coronation, 1953), events loaded with significance and alongside which dance played out its own cultural role. I use walking as both a way of knowing the past and a framing device, joining contemporary events on the streets with particular dance events and practices.
Larraine Nicholas is a senior lecturer in Dance Studies at the University of Roehampton, London. She is the author of the monograph Dancing in Utopia: Dartington Hall and its Dancers (2007, Dance Books). Current research is towards a book for publication in 2013, Walking/Dancing: Three Years in London, 1951 - 53
Nyqvist, Katja (Roehampton University)
Urban Encounters and Collective Intimacy in Rosemary Lee’s Square Dances (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
This paper explores the sensory encounters involved in Rosemary Lee’s large-scale outdoor work Square Dances, in which I performed in the green squares of Bloomsbury in October 2011. I seek to reveal how the four quietly intensive performances challenged common urban attitudes of dissociation and deadening of the senses and provided a blueprint for how urban space can facilitate collective intimacy. In particular, I will shed light on Square Dances’ creative process and how it gave rise to the attentive and sensory relations between performers, audience and the urban landscape.
Katja Nyqvist is a Finnish dance artist and Senior Lecturer in dance at Roehampton University, London. Her practice-led research explores perceived and embodied spatiality of performance drawing on her experience in improvisation, somatics and Choreological studies. Since graduating from Laban (BA, MA) in 2007, Katja has been making and performing work for stage, outdoor, gallery and other spaces, most recently collaborating with filmmaker Richard Misek (2011).
O'Maley, Mark (Goddard College)
Mark O’Maley is an instigator of space, bodies and ideas. He has designed lighting and spaces for dance across the United States, Europe, and South America. Mark received his BA in Lighting Design for Art, Architecture, and Performance from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and is currently pursuing his MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts at Goddard College with an emphasis on the pedagogy of design. www.markomaley.com
Oh, Chuyun (UT Austin)
The Precarious Identity of Korean Modern Dance Higher Education in the 1980s: Feminine Empowerment and Oppression in the Martha Graham Technique (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
Although the Martha Graham technique has been identified as autobiographical self-investment, Ewha Womans University, a representative modern dance institution in South Korea, has adopted this intensely personal Graham technique as a core program despite the racial, ethnic, geographical, and historical specificities of Korea. Graham has been regarded as a pioneer of feminine power in dance. Yet Graham also maintains authoritative hierarchy in her company. I argue that the Graham technique has been used to both empower and oppress women dancers in South Korea from the 1980s to the present, which supported by women movement and military dictatorship.
Chuyun Oh is a Ph. D. student in Performance as Public Practice at UT Austin. She received Master’s degree in Ewha Womans University in South Korea majoring dance aesthetics and philosophy. She won several scholarships and international dance awards, including Fulbright graduate study award (2009). She is an author of two books about interdisciplinary art and art criticism and has worked as a professional dancer, choreographer, film director, critic, and performance studies scholar.
Parfitt-Brown, Clare (University of Chichester)
Paris Dansant? Improvising across urban, racial and international geographies in the early cancan (Friday, 10:30 a.m.)
The earliest sources on the cancan of the 1820s suggest that an array of non-French movement styles, probably observed at the popular theatres, influenced the working-class dancers who first improvised around the quadrille at the suburban guinguettes. However, by the 1840s, the cancan had become a symbol of July Monarchy Paris in bourgeois writings about the city, obscuring the international and racial ambiguities that haunted its inception. This paper therefore focuses on the tensions between the cancan’s status as ‘Parisian’, and as an embodiment of a popular culture based on fascination with France’s European and colonial others in the 1820s.
Clare Parfitt-Brown is a Senior Lecturer in Dance at the University of Chichester, UK. Her research focuses on the cultural histories of popular dance practices. She is Chair of the Society of Dance History Scholars Working Group on Popular, Social and Vernacular Dance, and a founding member of PoP Moves, a working group to develop the emerging research area of popular performance. Clare has co-authored two PhD study guides, and published in international journals.
Paris, Carl (Drexel Univeristy)
Black Drill Team Performance: Dance, Competition, and Socialization (Friday, 10:30 a.m.)
Abstract Drill Team Performance: Dance, Competition, and Community Curator: Carl Paris, Ph.D. Combining unique marching styles with modern dance, hip hop, step, and mime, many of today’s African American drill teams are performing spaces in which inner-city youths explore their creative and expressive voices within a competitive community-building structure. In this two-part presentation, I first draw on archival material, interviews and my own experience in a paper that examines aesthetic and socio-cultural components of drill team performance since I was a youth. I then present Darius Smith in an interview and a performance by his prizing-winning Philadelphia-based drill team, Iconik.
Carl Paris, Ph.D. in Dance Theory and Cultural Studies (Temple University), has performed major roles with Olatunji African Dance, Eleo Pomare, Martha Graham, and Alvin Ailey and received the Dance Association of Madrid Award in 1995 for his contribution to dance in Spain. He has published articles on blacks in modern dance and presently teaches African American History at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and Dance History and Appreciation at Drexel University.
Parsons, Samantha (Royal Academy of Dance, Society of Dance History Scholars)
Has change in the urban landscape ignited ballet’s evolution? A perspective on the contribution of London’s landscape and social relations to current dance (ballet) practices, specifically Wayne McGregor’s Infra (2008). (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
The sentimental aesthetics of ballet are far removed from some connotations associated with the city: noise, traffic, detachment and indifference. Recent practices in ballet attempt to provide an urban dimension through choreographic essays that are reliant upon urban digital landscapes and installations. Through reading Wayne McGregor’s Infra (2008), this paper explores the idea of the city mapping itself onto dance practices. Drawing upon the metaphors of T.S. Elliot’s The Wasteland (1922), parallels between urban landscapes, installations and McGregor’s balletic choreographic practices shape the discursive practices that reflect London’s social and urban spaces against the ballet’s inherent form.
Samantha Parsons is a researcher and dance educator. Her most recent research explored the impact of Wayne McGregor’s work on Classicism in the 21st Century, in light of Infra (2008). Her research interests lie in critical dance studies. She received a BA (Honors) in Dance Education from the University of Surrey / Royal Academy of Dance. She is trained in classical ballet and contemporary modern techniques and is an active dance instructor.
Powell, Joya (Movement of the People Dance Company and The Center for Dance, Movement and Somatic Learning at Stony Brook University)
Pagode, a type of Samba, started in the shanty towns of Rio de Janeiro as a means of revolt against the elitist commercialization of Carnival groups in the 1970’s. Since then Pagode has become an urban phenomena, that with the help of the internet, has united the Brazilian people through the practice of common choreographed phrases. In this workshop participants will learn the history and evolution of Pagode while learning actual Pagode choreography. The workshop will start with a cohesive warm-up, participants will then learn the basics of traditional Samba, and will conclude with exploring actual popular Pagode choreography.
Joya Powell received her M.A. in Dance Education from NYU, and her B.A. in Latin American Studies/Creative Writing from Columbia University. She lived in Salvador Brazil for four years working with the acclaimed Carnival group Ilê Aiyê. She is an Adjunct at SUNY Stony Brook where she teaches World Dance and Jazz. As Artistic Director of Movement of the People Dance Company she is dedicated to connecting cultures and empowering communities through dance.
Preston, Virginia K. (Stanford University)
Dystopic and Miraculous Bodies—Poverty, Disability and the City in Early Ballet (Friday, 10:30 a.m.)
My paper addresses disability in baroque dance, taking up representations of dismemberment in seventeenth-century ballet. The staging of city quarters outside the reach of early modern French law, I suggest, projects an argument for the expansion of state power, speaking to histories of policing, disability and social hierarchies. How and why does disability appear as artifice in these performances? What is the role of military veterans’ bodies in the spectacle of political crisis? And how might we address spectacles of disability in early dance studies?
Virginia Preston is a PhD candidate in the Department of Drama and PhD minor in history at Stanford University. She is a Fall 2011 resident at La Cité internationale des arts, in Paris, and a 2012-2013 recipient of Mellon Dissertation Fellowship at Stanford. Virginia is the graduate student representative for the Society of Dance History Scholars, and she joined the board of the Society of Canadian Dance Studies this year.
Prickett, Stacey (University of Roehampton)
Encountering the Diaspora: Dancing around and through London’s Heritage Sites (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
London’s rich histories are visible in sites ranging from the maritime grandeur of Greenwich to the monumental square honouring the battle of Trafalgar. Such iconic public spaces are mediated through South Asian dance performances that celebrate London’s cosmopolitan diversity and transformation from a post-imperial into a global city. Explicit and implicit political readings of productions are enhanced through interrogation of the way the dance theatre spectacles alternately complement and critique the heritage of city and nation. Utilising kathak, bharatantayam, ballet and contemporary dance, inclusive identities are constructed, drawing on multiple religious and national imaginaries (including Pakistani and Indian, Hindu and Muslim).
Stacey Prickett (Principal Lecturer, Department of Dance, University of Roehampton, London) coordinates the PhD programme, teaches contextual studies modules and supervises student research into socio-cultural perspectives on dance. Stacey publishes articles on the politics of identity (modern and contemporary dance) and on issues of identity and pedagogy in South Asian dance in Britain and India. She is working on a book about dance and politics in Britain and the USA.
Rahman, Munjulika (Northwestern University)
Dancing in the (Socialist) City: Bangladesh at the 1979 International Folk Festival in Zagreb (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
Since Bangladesh’s independence in 1971, the government has sent cultural delegations to international festivals where performers represent the nation through Bangladeshi “folk dance,” which is an “invented tradition” that is not performed by rural people. In the paper I use the case study of the Bangladeshi delegation’s 1979 trip to the Folk Festival in Zagreb to explore underlying political implications. I contend that the festival was a platform on which essentialized national identities were performed to demonstrate solidarity between different cultures, but on a deeper level, it served to propagate socialist perceptions of the “folk,” which influenced the development of Bangladeshi “folk dance.”
Munjulika Rahman is a PhD candidate in the Department of Performance Studies at Northwestern University. Her dissertation investigates the history, practice, and politics of dance in Bangladesh, particularly the expression of national identity through dance. Besides teaching courses at Northwestern, she has been involved in numerous performance projects. Munjulika is trained in Bengali music and is a student of various dance forms.
Ravn, Susanne (Institute of Sports Science and Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark)
Interacting Bodies in Sports Dance and Argentinean Tango (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
The aim of this paper is to explore how interactions are shaped and connections given life in two different kinds of couple dancing: the improvised Argentinean tango danced at the tango salons (the Milonga), and the choreographed sports dance performed in competitions. The exploration will focus on how the sense of movement in tango and sports dance takes shape in different ways and how the interactions of the dancers might present ‘micro levels’ of socializing processes. In different ways the histories and cultures of the dances are expected to be mapped onto and created in the practices of the dancing.
Dr Susanne Ravn is Associate Professor at the University of Southern Denmark. In her research she combines praxis, ethnography and phenomenology. Her current research is focused on exploring interdisciplinary challenges, embodied interaction and how the physicality of the body is present to dancers’ awareness. She has published several books (Danish and English) on learning processes and sense awareness. Ravn is Chair of the board of the Nordic Forum for Dance Research (NOFOD).
Rebudal, Jeff Michael (Wayne State University)
Spero Meliora: The Intersection of Dance, Music and Interactive Multi-Media Surrounding the Revitalization of the City of Detroit (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
What is Detroit today? What is the perspective of Detroit to “outsiders”? Why does recent past history continue to negatively influence the perception of Detroit? What is being done to revitalize Detroit and the community? The responses to these questions are the basis of the exploration for movement and dance improvisation. This investigative and exploratory process reveals how timely and relevant the challenges Detroit faces are also experienced throughout other U.S. cities and towns.  This paper describes the creative process of Spero Meliora--a choreographic project incorporating contemporary dancers, interactive multi-media, and opera vocalists performed “in-the-round.”
Jeff Rebudal is an Associate Professor at Wayne State University and received degrees from American University and University of Hawaii-Manoa. He is artistic director Rebudal Dance and is an original founding member of the Seán Curran Company. His choreography has been presented at Joyce SoHo, Danspace Project and other venues including the Cultural Center of the Philippines in Manila. Rebudal’s opera credits include New York City Opera, Opera de Montreal, Den Nye Opera, among others.
Reidy, Michael (Bates College)
Headlong Dance Theater: Avalanche (Thursday, 8:00 p.m.)
Michael Reidy is a scenic, lighting and production specialist, and Chair of the Department of Theater and Dance, Bates College. Michael has designed numerous productions in theaters across the country and internationally. He holds a MFA from California Institute of the Arts in performing design and technology.
Rivera-Servera, Ramón H. (Northwestern University)
Quotidian Crossings: Latino Queer Pathways through the Gentrifying City (Friday, 10:30 a.m.)
This presentation draws from multi-sited ethnographic data in Texas, New York, and Arizona to explore how Latina/o queer dance club patrons negotiated the intensification of anti-immigrant sentiment and policy in the United States between the late 1990s and early 2000s. This vilification of Latina/o migration occurred at the same time that a national Latina/o niche market was consolidated and narratives of Latina/o ascendancy into the majority minority demographic slot and the middle class circulated. This paper turns to how the micro-choreographies of the Latina/o queer dance club produced and sustained Latina/o interethnic affinities and intimacies or latinidad during this period. Ultimately, this presentation argues for the critical labor of dance as a practice where alternative embodiments and communitarian configurations were rehearsed in between the anti-immigrant and mainstreaming figurations of latinidad.
Robinson, Karima A. (SUNY Purchase College)
Lost in Migration: Appropriating African Ritual in Modern Jamaica (Friday, 10:30 a.m.)
During Jamaica’s decolonization remnants of African ritual practices were transposed from rural to urban areas.  These practices moved from insulated lower class communities to the public domain of national stages of the upper classes.  I argue that the crossing of these geographic and social boundaries created another necessary schism.  The most popular Afro-Jamaica religious practices, which became the tropes of nationalism, made their way from the sacred to the secular realm.  While they built cultural capital, much was lost in the translation.  The absence of the ancestors created performances that resembled stereotypical Western constructions of Africa.    
Karima A. Robinson is an Assistant Professor at SUNY Purchase where she teaches courses on dramatic literature, theatre history, play development, and performance studies.  She specializes in African, Caribbean, and African American theatre history and performance traditions.  Professor Robinson is currently writing a book entitled Playing Possessed: The Performance of Spiritual and Political Transformation in Jamaica which examines the historiography of Jamaican ancestor worship from the colonial sugar cane plantations to national stages. 
Rossen, Rebecca (University of Texas at Austin)
The Time is Now: American Zionism and Sophie Maslow’s Utopian Choreography for Israel Bonds (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
This paper discusses Sophie Maslow’s choreography for Israel Bonds’ Chanukah Festivals, held at Madison Square Garden from 1951–70, which raised millions annually. Focusing on the 1955 and ’56 festivals which flanked the Sinai Campaign, I show how Maslow represented the Jewish people as heroes and innovators, and offered an idealized portrait of “Israel” to address the politics and anxieties that framed these productions. Ultimately, Maslow created a symbiotic relationship between American modern dance and the modern Jewish state, demonstrating that dance could serve as a strong vehicle for the dissemination of Zionist ideology while strategically cultivating new audiences.
Rebecca Rossen is a dance historian, choreographer, and assistant professor in the Performance as Public Practice at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the author of the forthcoming Dancing Jewish, and several recent articles that have appeared in Feminist Studies (Summer 2011), TDR: The Drama Review (Fall 2011), and Theatre Journal (March 2012).
Russell, Tilden (Professor emeritus, Southern Connecticut State University)
Taubert in Danzig (Saturday, 11:00 a.m.)
Gottfried Taubert (1679-1746) wrote his encyclopedic magnum opus, the Rechtschaffener Tantzmeister (Leipzig, 1717), mostly in Danzig (now Gdansk, Poland) where he lived and worked from 1702-15. While there, Taubert became interested in the dances of foreign lands and peoples, and especially in the local (predominantly Polish) dance culture. Of central dance-historical importance, it was probably in cosmopolitan Danzig that Taubert first encountered Feuillet’s Chorégraphie and made his crucial decision to translate it into German for incorporation in the Rechtschaffener Tantzmeister, and thus introduce it in fact and not merely through hearsay to the German-speaking world.
Tilden Russell, Professor emeritus of Music at Southern Connecticut State University, is the author of The Compleat Dancing Master (Peter Lang, 2012), his two-volume translation with commentary of Taubert’s Rechtschaffener Tantzmeister. He also is co-author, with Dominique Bourassa, of The Menuet de la cour (G. Olms, 2007). His most recent article, “Anatomy of a Dedication: Gottfried Taubert and His Dedicatee,” appears in Dance Chronicle 35/2 (2012).
Sabee, Olivia (The Johns Hopkins University)
Rousseau’s Revolutionary Corps de Ballet (Saturday, 3:45 p.m.)
The 18th century Opéra de Paris was, more than a theater, a location for the display and reinforcement of social hierarchies. The French Revolution of 1789, then, had the power to profoundly disrupt the social and political foundations upon which the Opéra’s repertoire had been constructed, allowing revolutionary ideologies to penetrate this institution so closely associated with the ancien régime. This brought changes in ballet’s content and structure, and was tied to the new implementation of the corps de ballet, a change that had implications for the narrative constraints established in the 18th century ballet d’action.
Olivia Sabee is a PhD candidate at Johns Hopkins University. After graduating from North Carolina School of the Arts, she performed with Ballet Pacifica, the Civic Ballet of Chicago and ARC Dance in Seattle. She received a BA from the University of Chicago in 2008 where she wrote her thesis on Nijinsky's interpretation of Mallarmé's "L'après-midi d'un faune" and has spent the past year at the Ecole normale supérieure in Paris.
Sakamoto, Michael (Faculty, MFA-Interdisciplinary Arts Program, Goddard College; Adjunct Faculty, California Institute of the Arts)
Flash: A Case Study in Butoh, Hip-Hop, and Performing the Urban Body in Crisis (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
Butoh and hip-hop began as ways of being more than expression, appropriating the markers of cultural marginalization and urban order and decay, fashioning resistant aesthetic forms and recursively transforming their relationship to the dominant order. Butoh artist and scholar Michael Sakamoto performs an interdisciplinary lecture on this historical context with excerpts from “Flash,” his collaboration with hip-hop choreographer and Philadelphia native, Rennie Harris. “Flash” is inspired by discourses on personal, intercultural, and socio-economic crises and suggests metaphors for illumination, enlightenment, stealthiness, and transcendence.
Michael Sakamoto is an interdisciplinary artist active in Butoh-based dance, theatre, and photography. His works have been presented throughout Asia, Europe and North America. Michael has received grants and awards from the Japan Foundation, Meet the Composer, Asian Cultural Council, and many others. He is on faculty in the MFA-Interdisciplinary Arts program at Goddard College and California Institute of the Arts Theatre Department. Michael holds a Dance MFA from UCLA where he is a PhD candidate in Culture and Performance. Information at www.michaelsakamoto.com.
Schwadron, Hannah
Pious and Porn Spectacles: Frontier Choreographies of LA’s Jewish Femme (Sunday, 11:00 a.m.)
This paper compares the construction of radical Jewish femininity by leading Jewish women at IKAR, a Jewish spiritual community lead by Rabbi Sharon Brous, and Burning Angel, the punk-porn company of director, Joanna Angel. Beginning from the overlapping marketing of cultural orgs as “Not Your Bubbe’s Synagogue” and “Not Your Daddy’s Porn,” I partner these overlapping personifications of a sexier Jewish female figure as the newest business of Jewish identity politics. Of particular interest is how these seemingly opposed organizations—one religious and one “altporn”—defend and mobilize a “frontier feminism” at the (embattled) edges of LA’s progressive Jewish discourse.
Hannah Schwadron is currently a PhD Candidate in Critical Dance Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Her research focuses on spectacles of Jewish femininity and the work of self-parody to mobilize concerns tied to race, class, gender and sexuality. In conjunction with dissertation interests, Hannah continues to choreograph and perform the “Sexy Jewess” in various spaces and places for recreation and research purposes.
Schwan, Alexander (Freie Universität Berlin)
Scarlet Letters on the Roof. Urban Topography and Body-Calligraphy in Trisha Brown’s Roof and Fire Piece (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
Through a close examination of Trisha Brown’s “Roof and Fire Piece”, originally performed on rooftops in SoHo in 1973 and recreated on the High Line in Chelsea in 2011, I will analyze how dance transforms its own surrounding space by leaving ephemeral inscriptions within the network of urban structures. By focusing in particular on the figuration and de-figuration of the bodily shapes of the dancers, I will argue that their movements, blended with an urban topography, create a synaesthetic and kinaesthetic vision of dance as an embodied form of fluid architecture and semaphore-like writing in the city.
Dance Scholar, DFG Research Training Group “Notational Iconicity”, Freie Universität Berlin, Ph.D. Project: “Room-Writing. Graphism in Postmodern and Contemporary Choreography”. Studies in Protestant Theology, Jewish Studies and Philosophy in Heidelberg, Jerusalem and Berlin; Studies in Theatre Directing, Academy of Music and Performing Arts, Frankfurt/Main. Areas of interest include postmodern and contemporary dance, dance and religion, floriography. Recent publication: “‘Dancing is like scribbling, you know’. Schriftbildlichkeit in Trisha Browns Choreographie ‘Locus’” in: Sprache und Literatur 42 (2011) 107, pp. 58-70.
Scolieri, Paul (Barnard College)
Modernism on Main Street: Ted Shawn and His Men Dancers (Friday, 4:00 p.m.)
As modern dance developed in New York City throughout the 1930s, Ted Shawn performed with his company of men dancers in high school auditoriums, college gymnasiums, and town halls throughout the urban, suburban, and rural Midwest and South, largely to audiences who had never seen theater dance, no less his all-male, avant-garde dances. This presentation examines how Shawn tried to meet as well as challenge artistic and social sensibilities on “Main Street” throughout the 1930s. It also considers his conflicted relationship to New York City, from which he felt “exiled” by dancers, audiences, and critics that called the city home.
Paul Scolieri, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of dance at Barnard College, Columbia University. He is currently the Joan Nordell Fellow (2011-12) at Houghton Library, Harvard University where he is completing research for a book about Ted Shawn. His first book, Dancing the New World: Aztecs, Spaniards, and the Choreography of Conquest, will appear with University of Texas Press this year. He is a member of SDHS board of directors.
Seyler, Elizabeth M. (University of Vermont)
Queer Tango and Heteronormative Hierarchies in Three North American Cities (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
Argentine tango developed within the dominantly heteronormative, patriarchal culture of early twentieth-century Argentina and Uruguay but is currently danced worldwide in cultures shaped by feminism and glbt rights. This paper investigates current heteronormative hierarchies in tango communities in three North American cities and investigates opportunities that “queer tango” (non-heteronormative roles and partnering) may offer for dismantling such hierarchies. Quantitative data describe dancers’ demographics, characteristics, and partnering, while qualitative data explore dancers’ experiences, beliefs, and behaviors. Data gathered in Philadelphia, PA and Burlington, VT (USA) and in Montreal, QC (Canada) from 2006 to 2012 reveal intriguing cultural similarities and differences.
Elizabeth M. Seyler is a published author and award-winning researcher who has presented at conferences for the World Dance Alliance’s Global Assembly, the Association Francophone pour le Savoir, CORD and SDHS (joint conference), and the École des hautes études en sciences sociales. She holds a master's degree in education from the University of Vermont and a doctorate in dance from Temple University. She currently teaches courses on Argentine tango dance, music, history, and culture.
Sikand, Nandini (Lafayette College)
Dancing Across Borders: The Regional Identity of Odissi Dance (Friday, 10:30 a.m.)
Odissi has transformed from a ritual dance in a sacralized space to an aesthetic performance in the public sphere. Like other Indian classical dance forms, it has been shaped at the intersection of colonial discourse, nationalist historiography and regional identity. Bengal, which boasts of the Shanitiniketan style of dance as well as other folk forms, does not however, have its own “classical” form, and due to geographical and cultural proximity to Orissa, many Bengalis study Odissi. In this paper, I look at the complex history between Orissa and Bengal and how it continues to influence the contemporary practice of Odissi dance.
Nandini Sikand is an anthropologist, independent filmmaker and Odissi dancer. She is an assistant professor at Lafayette College, in Easton, PA where she teaches in the interdisciplinary Film and Media Studies program. Her dance company, Sakshi Productions regularly creates and performs neo-classical Odissi and contemporary dance works.
Simonet, Andrew (Headlong Dance Theater)
Andrew Simonet is founding Co-Director of Headlong Dance Theater. In 2006, Andrew founded Artists U, a professional development and planning program for individual performing artists in Philadelphia. Artists U is now expanding to Baltimore and South Carolina.
Simonson, Mary (Colgate University)
Picturing Dance: Rita Sacchetto (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
In the fall of 1909, dancer Rita Sacchetto arrived in the United States and immediately won praise from critics for her “dance pictures”: dressed in elaborate period costumes modeled on paintings and accompanied by art music, Sacchetto introduced dramatic plots through dance and pantomime. Though Sacchetto’s performances have most often been likened to tableaux vivants, she was not interested in reproducing paintings. Rather, she offered intermedial translations of these works, using both content and representational strategies from various art forms to generated new, meaningful interpretations.
Mary Simonson is Assistant Professor of Film & Media Studies and Women’s Studies at Colgate University. Her work on early twentieth-century music, dance, and cinematic performance in the United States has appeared in Women and Music, the Journal of the American Musicological Society, and edited volumes. Her book, Body Knowledge: Performance, Intermediality, and American Entertainment, 1907-1917, is forthcoming from Oxford University Press.
Skeel, Sharon (independent)
Catherine Littlefield, Philadelphian (Friday, 2:00 p.m.)
Dancer/choreographer Catherine Littlefield (1905-51) has always been closely identified with Philadelphia, her native city. As founder of the Philadelphia Ballet Company, she took her role as citizen and cultural ambassador seriously. This presentation will focus on two productions highlighting Littlefield’s civic engagement. The first was a grand historical pageant entitled America, presented as part of the Sesquicentennial International Exposition of 1926. Littlefield’s mother was the pageant’s ballet director, while Littlefield served as principal dancer. The second was a ballet entitled The Rising Sun: A Ballet History of Old Philadelphia, which Littlefield choreographed in 1937 to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution.
Sharon Skeel has been researching the life and work of Philadelphia dancer/choreographer Catherine Littlefield (1905-51) for the last 20 years with the aim of eventually writing a biography. She received a 1995 grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts to support her work, and has given lectures on Littlefield for the Pennsylvania Ballet, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Free Library of Philadelphia. She has written for American Heritage magazine, the Philadelphia Inquirer and Books & Culture: A Christian Review.
Smith, Amy (Headlong Dance Theater)
Amy Smith is founding Co-Director of Headlong Dance Theater. Outside of Headlong, Amy has performed in the work of Deborah Hay, Ishmael Houston Jones, among others. She has performed extensively in theater and cabaret, and has won a Barrymore for 1812 Productions’ Suburban Love Songs and a Bessie for Headlong’s ST*R W*RS and other stories. She currently serves as Treasurer on the Dance/USA board of Trustees.
Soto, Merián (Associate Professor, Esther Boyer Colllege of Music & Dance, Temple University)
Choreographer Merián Soto is known for her large scale performance collaborations with visual artist Pepón Osorio, her experiments with Salsa, and her recent Branch Dance Series. She is the recipient a New York Dance and Performance Award BESSIE for sustained achievement (2000), and a ROCKY (Greater Philadelphia Dance and Physical Theater Award) for the One Year Wissahickon Park Project (2008). Soto is an Associate Professor at Temple University and a PennPAT roster artist.
Springer, Dawn (Postgraduate Fellow, Theater and Dance, Dickinson College)
Tebow and the Touch Down Dance (Sunday, 11:00 a.m.)
This paper explores the intersections between regulated end zone celebrations (touch down dances) and ethnicity, gender and urban location in the NFL and the NCAA. Tebow and the Touchdown Dance views high-profile sporting events as hyper-social and constructed arenas of bodily performance. From the Icky Shuffle to the current Tebowing movement, we will look to American football culture to see how the sport can uniquely embody not only local heritage, but the racialized and gendered expectations within the many woven traditions of the contemporary moment.
As a choreographer and dancer Dawn Springer has performed throughout the US and abroad. Recent performances include with Helen Simoneau Danse, and her own choreography in the 2011 Philly Fringe topos topio, Danspace Project, Kennedy Center Millennium Stage, and as a Gala Concert selection in the 2011 Northeast Regional ACDFA. She was an invited speaker in the 2011 Knowing Dance More Series at The University of the Arts. Artist-in-Residence 2008-2010 University of Maryland. www.dawnspringer.com
Suárez, Lucía de las Mercedes (Amherst College)
Collaborations: Viver Brasil, Afro-Bahian dance in the Sister Cities of Bahia and Los Angeles (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
Collaborations: Viver Brasil, Afro-Bahian dance in the Sister Cities of Bahia and Los Angeles. Through a case study focused on the LA based, Bahia informed dance company Viver Brasil, this presentation examines how Afro-Bahian identity has been tranformed through the stagings of “Orixás,” choreographed by Rosangela Sylvestre. It examines, historically and culturally how Bahia, through dance is represented, as a site of origins, and how the company, Viver Brasil has rendered Los Angeles as a site of translations and continuities.
Lucía M. Suárez, Ph.D., Program in Literature, Duke University, is Associate Professor of Spanish, Amherst College. She is the author of The Tears of Hispaniola: Haitian and Dominican Diaspora Memory (2006) and the co-editor, with Ruth Behar, of The Portable Island: Cubans at Home in the World (2008). As a Ford Fellow, she has been traveling to Bahia since 2007 for fieldwork on the dynamics of dance in the city’s marginal communities.
Tomé, Lester (Smith College, Five College Dance Department)
Despair and Suicide in a Havana Tenement House: Antes del Alba (1947), the First Afro-Cuban Ballet (Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)
Alberto Alonso’s Antes del alba (1947), an Afro-Cuban ballet revolutionary in its theme and choreography, contributed an incisive political commentary on race and social class. Set in a tenement house, it denounced the marginalization and poor living conditions of blacks in Havana in the 1940s. It narrated the plight of a widow who, being sick, unemployed and unable to pay rent, commits suicides to escape illness and eviction. The suicide scene forewent ballet’s classical vocabulary and featured, instead, a furious rumba danced by Alicia Alonso in the title role. A shock to upper-class ballet sponsors, the work was banned after two performances.
Lester Tomé, PhD, teaches at Smith College. He is writing a book about Alicia Alonso and the National Ballet of Cuba's postcolonial articulation of a Cuban identity in ballet. He contributed to A. Alonso's Diálogos con la Danza and M. Kant's The Cambridge Companion to Ballet, and, for a decade, worked as a dance critic in Cuba and Chile. He has been an NEA and New York Times Foundation fellow at ADF's Institute for Dance Criticism.
Vasinarom, Manissa (Lecturer)
The Development of Lakhon Nai (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
Lakhon Nai is a form of classical court-style dance drama from Thailand, the original concept of which started during the court tradition of Ayutthaya period. It later evolved with the social, economic and cultural influences of several subsequent periods. These resulted in changes of performing styles and decreasing productions under the royal patronage. It is currently under the supervision of the Fine Arts Department, the Ministry of Culture. Despite its modifications, this theatre form still retains its original aesthetics as well as reflects the way of life, culture and history based on the perspective of Thai courtiers.
A full-time lecturer on classical Thai dance of the Faculty of Fine and Applied Arts, Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, Manissa Vasinarom completed her master thesis paper titled Choreography of Chao Chom Manda Khien from Chulalongkorn University in 2006. Her action research in 2010 is titled Development of Dramatic Arts Skills toward Professionalism of Fourth-Year Undergraduate Students through Multiple Learning Management, Performing Arts Department (Thai Dance), Faculty of Fine and Applied Arts, Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University.
Vazquez, Viveca (Professor, Universidad de Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras)
My participation in the roundtable/panel “Dancing Latina(o) New York” will focus on the exhibition/performance project CONDUCTA that I will be presenting at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo in San Juan in 2013. This event will portray a panoramic view of my work emphasizing specific themes and sites of importance as my stay in NYC in the eighties when my artistic voice developed a foundational platform nurtured by the electrifying experimental energy that still permeated in the dance community of downtown NYC at the time. The politics of art in that historical context explains the work we do and teach today.
One of the leading forces in experimental dance in Puerto Rico. Graduate studies at NYU. Teaches dance, humanities, gender & performance courses at University of PR. In NYC has shown work at DTW, PS122, PS1, St. Mark's Church, Movement Research Knitting Factory. Also in Philadelphia, LA, Boston, New Mexico and Mexico, Venezuela, Argentina, and Portugal. Has taught in Quito, Ecuador and last year in Bogota, Colombia. From 1989-96 coproduced and codirected with Merian Soto ROMPEFORMA, an international experimental performance marathon in PR.
Westwater, Kathy (Sarah Lawrence College)
Pageantry, Prosthetics and Performative Acts of Walking (Friday, 8:30 a.m.)
“Pageantry, Prosthetics and Performative Acts of Walking at Fresh Kills Landfill” documents research undertaken at what was once the largest landfill in the world, as it currently undergoes a 30-year conversion into a park. Looking to the seminal equipment pieces of Trisha Brown which stretched the vernacular of the pedestrian through engagement with built forms, and that took acts of walking to dangerously compromising spatial contexts; at Fresh Kills I generated peripatetic scores amidst environmental trauma, that extend post-modern pedestrian practices and speak to the ability of the individual to adapt to a precarious environment.
Kathy Westwater is a New York based choreographer and, since 2001, guest faculty member at Sarah Lawrence College where she received an MFA. After receiving a BA in Economics at William and Mary, Westwater moved to New York to dance. Since 1996, she has created numerous works situated in a diverse range of locations, including an interactive webcast; a landfill, warehouse, and museum; parks, schools and churches; and numerous dance studios and theaters.
Wilson, Alicia
Framing the Consumption of Movement: Popular Representation of the Dancing Body and the Relationship to the Viewer (Sunday, 11:00 a.m.)
This research focuses on the process of the dancing body becoming a mass product, and the commodification of both the observer and this dancing body. Through examining the television show So You Think You Can Dance, I will look at the spectacle that this show creates, exposing the process of observation and breaking down the phenomenon of viewing dance. I will also bring into the discussion Chicago based modern dance company Lucky Plush Productions, creating a dialogue about popular culture and raising questions surrounding leveraging the divide between art and entertainment in the dance world.
Alicia Wilson is a Chicago based dance scholar and choreographer. She holds a B.A in Dance Studies and Dancemaking from Columbia College Chicago. Her current research explores the dancing body in popular culture, examining spectacle, commodification and the relationship to the viewer. She has presented at the Dancing Under Construction conference at UC Riverside, and contributes dance writings for the Windy City Times. Wilson is co-founder of The Attic, a research grounded, multi-discipline art collaborative.
Wolf, Sara (UCLA Dept. of World Arts and Culture/Dance (PhD candidate))
In the Home and on the Street: The Convivial Citizenship of Headlong Dance Theater and Rajni Shah (Saturday, 3:45 p.m.)
This paper examines Philadelphia-based Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town is a Mystery (2012) and London-based Rajni Shah’s give what you want, take what you need (2008) for the manner in which each choreographs intimate spheres of interaction amidst the anonymity of the artists’ respective cities. I theorize the two as exemplars of what I term convivial citizenship, a generative model of belonging that highlights sociability across difference by rescaling an ethos of cosmopolitanism onto the micro-locality of the event of the performance.
Sara Wolf currently is completing a dissertation titled Flag, Passport, Bomb: Choreographing Citizenship in the Twenty-first Century. A former dance critic for the Los Angeles Times, LA Weekly, and other publications, she has developed and taught courses on citizenship and the arts, arts criticism, dance history and dance literacy and has published in Theatre Research International, Extensions: The Online Journal of Embodiment and Technology, v2, Dance Research Journal and e-misférica.
Yang, Youngeun (University of Surrey )
The Korean National Ballet: Making and Moving National Identity (Sunday, 9:00 a.m.)
Since its founding in 1962, the Korean National Ballet has acted as a national representative and hence has been intimately involved with the implementation of cultural policy as set by the central government. Recently, as part of the government’s National Branding project, the KNB produced a new ballet, Prince Hodong (Moon, 2009), based on a Korean traditional tale, proposing the hybrid concept, Korean ballet. This paper argues that the KNB achieves more than mere hybridisation in that it constructs and shapes an idea of national identity that corresponds to current political demands, thus exerting a reciprocal influence on Korean society.
Youngeun Yang is a PhD candidate in Dance, Film and Theatre Studies at the University of Surrey and the dance critic for Dance Forum (Korea). Yang had professional ballet training at the Yewon Arts School and the Elmhurst School for Dance before studying at the Royal Academy of Dance (BA Hons, LRAD) and Roehampton University (MA). Her current research focuses on the role of the Korean National Ballet in constructing Korean national identity.